Page 1 of 10 123456 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 93

Thread: Chivalry

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Last Online
    Thursday, August 20th, 2009 @ 12:11 AM
    Ethnicity
    Slavic
    Subrace
    Uralic/Alpine/Pontid mixed
    Country
    United States United States
    Location
    USA
    Gender
    Posts
    3,309
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    2
    Thanked in
    2 Posts

    Chivalry

    http://www.chronique.com/Library/Chivalry/dead.htm

    Isn't Chivalry Dead?!

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    by Brian R. Price
    AKA SCA Brion Thornbird ap Rhys, Earl and Knight, OL
    September 14, 1995

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    No indeed, chivalry is not dead!
    As an idea, chivalry's roots are tied to the fundamental Western values that bind our civilization, a culture that I am proud to be a part of. Chivalry is an idealization of virtue, a wedding of military excellence with courtesy, a sense of justice, piety, and honor. All of this is brought foward to us from a dark time in history, from days when men fought one another, fought the harsh world that had broken Roman order, fought against the plagues visited upon Europe, a troika of perils nearly destroying European culture.

    The idea of chivalry came out of this darkness like a pheonix; first in the glorification of the warrior virtues that Charlemagne used to unify Europe and dispell the incroachment of foreign religions and cultures. Men saw heros as bringing them from the darkness, heros like Charlemagne and Alexander. The idea of a man's greatness as seen through the eyes of these people is brought to us with potent energy in the Song of Roland, where Roland is glorified for his loyalty, prowess, and indominatable courage. As the feudal system was founded,the warrior (latin--milites) became an important social figure, glorified in song and rewarded in land and revenue.

    These milites were a rowdy bunch, brawling and fighting amongst themselves as much as fighting for their peasants or their king. But there was some order, and this order began to reduce the barbarism that had been so much a part of life after the fall of Rome.

    During the 12th century, as society began to really settle, two important things happened to the ideals of what was first called "knighthood." First, the church, ever dominant in medieval affairs of morality, began to reshape the idea of the social warrior to its own ends. Knights were called to crusade, to be the "soldiers of God." The crusades were launched,the ideal put forward by the church sought to add new virtues to the potent strength of the warrior--that with God and Right on one's side, the sword arm itself was strengthened. The church added piety, justice, defense of the innocent and the weak, honesty, humility and purity.

    Alongside of this new "religious" chivalry, secular influences arose that had an equally strong say in the new reality of knighthood. The ideas of Courtly Love, under the patronage of Elanor of Aquitaine and her daughter Marie, created a new cult of adoration surrounding women. Encapsulated by Andreas Capallanus in The Art of Courtly Love, the central tenent in this school of thought was that through love the knight or lover could be strengthened. by the love of a woman. Not completely different from the ideals of religious chivalry, where the knight was strengthened by devotion to God. From the Courts of Love chivalry acquired courtesy, generosity, fidelity,and the respect & defense of women.

    Out of the Courtly Love movement came tales of romance, from which the legends of Alexander, Charlemagne, and Arthur hatched. These legends provided symbolic life to the ideals of church and court, building new heroes, measuring the knight by a new ideal standard. The symbols that have grown out of these legends are familiar to every young Westerner--King Arthur and the Round Table, Knights in Shining Armor, and not least, chivalry. In these tales chivalry was the idealization of each age; in each romance and in each treatise on knighthood the authors set down new standards that the knight was to be judged by. Chivalric virtues were a crystal clear distillation of what it meant to be a fine human being, a person in search of justice and humility. These standards grew and changed over time, until the knight perished and the idea of chivalry metaporphasized into the ideal of avirtuous "officer and gentleman."

    But the symbols of chivalry are powerful--powerful because of their deep attachment to the most important virtues of man. Courtesy, respect, generosity (largesse), honesty, fidelity, humility, justice, excellence (prowess), courage, loyalty, duty. These things are timeless. Attached to the bright symbols of knighthood, they are still transmitted down through the generations, striking a chord of need when times seem dark.

    Today, morality and ethics are rare commodities. Schools no longer teach morality; but religion is able to reach only a few and families are often broken. We see the results of this disjunction nightly on the television news, and yearn for a better world.

    It is into this vacuum that the symbols of chivalry bring both memories of an idealized past and the promise for a better future. For indeed under the pressures of life man has only morality to defend his soul from the ravages of the world. Medieval tournament re-enactments recall something of these days gone past, compelling virtuous conduct by the mechanism of reputation. Though I cannot speak for all, tournament re-enactments give license to try out being good in a very gray world, to work towards a distant ideal. Many young men and women start down this path, finding that it brings both pleasure and a sense of peace with their world. The peace comes from the shield of ethics that they first begin to develop on the tournament field, gradually expanding it by baby steps to encompass their entire philosophy of life. In this sense tournament fighting is indeed a Western martial art--an art with a very old philosophy that speaks to the heart, as well as to the mind.

    No indeed, chivalry is definately not dead.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Last Online
    Thursday, August 20th, 2009 @ 12:11 AM
    Ethnicity
    Slavic
    Subrace
    Uralic/Alpine/Pontid mixed
    Country
    United States United States
    Location
    USA
    Gender
    Posts
    3,309
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    2
    Thanked in
    2 Posts

    Post Re: Chivalry

    http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/03691a.htm

    Chivalry
    Chivalry (derived through the French cheval from the Latin caballus) as an institution is to be considered from three points of view: the military, the social, and the religious. We shall also here consider the history of chivalry as a whole.

    MILITARY

    In the military sense, chivalry was the heavy cavalry of the Middle Ages which constituted the chief and most effective warlike force. The knight or chevalier was the professional soldier of the time; in medieval Latin, the ordinary word miles (soldier) was equivalent to "knight." This pre-eminence of cavalry was correlative with the decline of infantry on the battlefield. Four peculiarities distinguished the professional warrior:

    his weapons;
    his horse;
    his attendants, and
    his flag.
    Weapons

    The medieval army was poorly equipped for long-distance fighting, and bows and crossbows were still employed, although the Church endeavored to prohibit their use, at least between Christian armies, as contrary to humanity. At all events, they were regarded as unfair in combat by the medieval knight. His only offensive weapons were the lance for the encounter and the sword for the close fight, weapons common to both light-armed and heavy cavalry. The characteristic distinction of the latter, which really constituted chivalry, lay in their defensive weapons, which varied with different periods. These weapons were always costly to get and heavy to bear, such as the brunia or hauberk of the Carlovingian Era, the coat of mail, which prevailed during the Crusades, and lastly the plate armor introduced in the fourteenth century.

    Horses

    No knight was thought to be properly equipped without at least three horses:

    the battle horse, or dexterarius, which was led by hand, and used only for the onset (hence the saying, "to mount one's high horse"),
    a second horse, palfrey or courser, for the route, and
    the pack-horse for the luggage.
    Attendants

    The knight required several attendants:

    one to conduct the horses,
    another to bear the heaviest weapons, particularly the shield or escutcheon (scutum, hence scutarius, French escuyer, esquire);
    still another to aid his master to mount his battle horse or to raise him if dismounted;
    a fourth to guard prisoners, chiefly those of quality, for whom a high ransom was expected.
    These attendants, who were of low condition, were not to be confounded with the armed retainers, who formed the escort of a knight. From the thirteenth century the squires also went armed and mounted and, passing from one grade to the other, were raised finally to knighthood.
    Flags

    Banners were also a distinctive mark of chivalry. They were attached to, and carried on, the lance. There was a sharp distinction between the pennon, a flag pointed or forked at the extremity, used by a single chevalier or bachelor as a personal ensign, and the banner, square in form, used as the ensign of a band and reserved to the baron or baronet in command of a group of at least ten knights, called a constabulary. Each flag or banner was emblazoned with the arms of its owner to distinguish one from another on the battlefield. These armorial bearings afterwards became hereditary and gave birth to the complicated science of heraldry.

    SOCIAL

    The career of a knight was costly, requiring personal means in keeping with the station; for a knight had to defray his own expenses in an age when the sovereign had neither treasury nor war budget at his disposal. When land was the only kind of riches, each lord paramount who wished to raise an army divided his domain into military fiefs, the tenant being held to military service at his own personal expense for a fixed number of days (forty in France and in England during the Norman period). These fees, like other feudal grants, became hereditary, and thus developed a noble class, for whom the knightly profession was the only career. Knighthood, however, was not hereditary, though only the sons of a knight were eligible to its ranks. In boyhood they were sent to the court of some noble, where they were trained in the use of horses and weapons, and were taught lessons of courtesy. From the thirteenth century, the candidates, after they had attained the rank of squire, were allowed to take part in battles; but it was only when they had come of age, commonly twenty-one years, that they were admitted to the rank of knight by means of a peculiar ceremonial called "dubbing." Every knight was qualified to confer knighthood, provided the aspirant fulfilled the requisite conditions of birth, age, and training. Where the condition of birth was lacking in the aspirant, the sovereign alone could create a knight, as a part of his royal prerogative.

    RELIGIOUS

    In the ceremonial of conferring knighthood the Church shared, through the blessing of the sword, and by the virtue of this blessing chivalry assumed a religious character. In early Christianity, although Tertullian's teaching that Christianity and the profession of arms were incompatible was condemned as heretical, the military career was regarded with little favour. In chivalry, religion and the profession of arms were reconciled. This change in attitude on the part of the Church dates, according to some, from the Crusades, when Christian armies were for the first time devoted to a sacred purpose. Even prior to the Crusades, however, an anticipation of this attitude is found in the custom called the "Truce of God". It was then that the clergy seized upon the opportunity offered by these truces to exact from the rough warriors of feudal times a religious vow to use their weapons chiefly for the protection of the weak and defenseless, especially women and orphans, and of churches. Chivalry, in the new sense, rested on a vow; it was this vow which dignified the soldier, elevated him in his own esteem, and raised him almost to the level of the monk in medieval society. As if in return for this vow, the Church ordained a special blessing for the knight in the ceremony called in the Pontificale Romanum, "Benedictio novi militis." At first very simple in its form, this ritual gradually developed into an elaborate ceremony. Before the blessing of the sword on the altar, many preliminaries were required of the aspirant, such as confession, a vigil of prayer, fasting, a symbolical bath, and investiture with a white robe, for the purpose of impressing on the candidate the purity of soul with which he was to enter upon such a noble career. Kneeling, in the presence of the clergy, he pronounced the solemn vow of chivalry, at the same time often renewing the baptismal vow; the one chosen as godfather then struck him lightly on the neck with a sword (the dubbing) in the name of God and St. George, the patron of chivalry.

    HISTORY

    There are four distinct periods in the history of chivalry. The period of foundation, i.e. the time when the Truce of God was in force, witnessed the long contest of the Church against the violence of the age, before she succeeded in curbing the savage spirit of the feudal warriors, who prior to this recognized no law but that of brute force.

    First Period: The Crusades

    The Crusades introduced the golden age of chivalry, and the crusader was the pattern of the perfect knight. The rescue of the holy places of Palestine from Moslem domination and the defense of pilgrims became the new object of his vow. In return, the Church took him under her protection in a special way, and conferred upon him exceptional temporal and spiritual privileges, such as the remission of all penances, dispensation from the jurisdiction of the secular courts, and as a means of defraying the expenses of the journey to the Holy Land, knights were granted the tenth of all the church revenues. The vow of the crusader was limited to a specified period. For the distant expeditions into Asia, the average time was two or three years.

    Second Period: The Military Orders

    After the conquest of Jerusalem, the necessity of a standing army became peremptory, in order to prevent the loss of the Holy City to surrounding hostile nations. Out of this necessity arose the military orders which adopted as a fourth monastic vow that of perpetual warfare against the infidels. In these orders, wherein was realized the perfect fusion of the religious and the military spirit, chivalry reached its apogee. This heroic spirit had also its notable representatives among the secular crusaders, as Godfrey of Bouillon, Tancred of Normandy, Richard Couer de Lion, and above all Louis IX of France, in whom knighthood was crowned by sanctity. Like the monastic, the knightly vow bound with common ties warriors of every nation and condition, and enrolled them in a vast brotherhood of manners, ideals, and aims. The secular brotherhood had, like the regular its rule imposing on its members fidelity to their; lords and to their word, fair play on the battlefield, and the observance of the maxims of honour and courtesy. Medieval chivalry, moreover, opened a new chapter in the history of literature. It prepared the way and gave ready currency to an epic and romantic movement in literature reflecting the ideal of knighthood and celebrating its accomplishment and achievements. Provence and Normandy were the chief centres of this kind of literature, which was spread throughout all Europe by the trouvères and troubadours.

    Third Period: Secular Chivalry

    After the Crusades chivalry gradually lost its religious aspect. In this, its third period, honour remains the peculiar worship of knighthood. This spirit is manifested in the many knightly exploits which fill the annals of the long contest between England and France during the Hundred Years War. The chronicles of Froissart give a vivid picture of this age, where bloody battles alternate with tournaments and gorgeous pageants. Each contending nation has its heroes. If England could boast of the victories of the Black Prince, Chandos, and Talbot, France could pride herself on the exploits of Du Guesclin, Boucicaut, and Dunois. But with all the brilliance and glamour of their achievements, the main result was a useless shedding of blood, waste of money, and misery for the lower classes. The amorous character of the new literature had contributed not a little to deflect chivalry from its original ideal. Under the influence of the romances love now became the mainspring of chivalry. As a consequence there arose a new type of chevalier, vowed to the service of some noble lady, who could even be another man's wife. This idol of his heart was to be worshipped at a distance. Unfortunately, notwithstanding the obligations imposed upon the knightly lover, these extravagant fancies often led to lamentable results.

    Fourth Period: Court Chivalry

    In its last stages, chivalry became a mere court service. The Order of the Garter, founded in 1348 by Edward III of England, the Order of the Golden Fleece (Toison d'or) of Philip of Burgundy, dating from 1430, formed a brotherhood, not of crusaders, but of courtiers, with no other aim than to contribute to the splendor of the sovereign. Their most serious business was the sport of jousts and tournaments. They made their vows not in chapels, but in banquet halls, not on the cross, but on some emblematic bird. The "vow of the Swan" of 1306, was instituted during the feast of the dubbing of the son of Edward I. It was before God and the swan that the old king swore with his knights to avenge on Scotland the murder of his lieutenant. More celebrated is the "vow of the Pheasant," made in 1454 at the court of Philip of Burgundy. The motive was weighty indeed, being nothing else than the rescue of Constantinople, which had fallen the past year into the hands of the Turks. But the solemnity of the motive did not lessen the frivolity of the occasion. A solemn vow was taken before God and the pheasant at a gorgeous banquet, the profligate cost of which might better have been devoted to the expedition itself. No less than one hundred and fifty knights, the flower of the nobility, repeated the vow, but the enterprise came to nought. Chivalry had degenerated to a futile pastime and an empty promise.

    Literature, which had in the past so greatly contributed to the exaltation of chivalry, now reacted against its extravagances. In the early part of the fourteenth century this turning point becomes evident in the poetry of Chaucer. Although he himself had made many translations from the French romances, he mildly derides their manner in his "Sir Thopas." The final blow was reserved for the immortal work of Cervantes, "Don Quixote," which aroused the laughter of all Europe. Infantry, on its revival as an effective force on the battlefield during the fourteenth century began to dispute the supremacy which heavy cavalry had so long enjoyed. Chivalry which rested entirely upon the superiority of the horseman in warfare, rapidly declined. At Crécy (1346) and Agincourt (1415) the French knighthood was decimated by the arrows of the English archers of Edward III and Henry V. The Austrian nobility at Sempach (1386) and the Burgundian chivalry at Morat (1476) were unable to sustain the overpowering onslaught of the Swiss peasantry. With the advent of gunpowder and the general use of firearms in battle, chivalry rapidly disintegrated and finally disappeared altogether.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Last Online
    Thursday, August 20th, 2009 @ 12:11 AM
    Ethnicity
    Slavic
    Subrace
    Uralic/Alpine/Pontid mixed
    Country
    United States United States
    Location
    USA
    Gender
    Posts
    3,309
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    2
    Thanked in
    2 Posts

    Post Re: Chivalry

    The Code of Chivalry

    I wanted to put these here because I think that there are some good ideals within the code of chivalry. Plus it's interesting to see how our ideas about chivalry and/or honor have changed with time. Sure, some of this is obviously outdated and probably not very useful, but some of it is still good advice; I'm sure you'll recognize which points are useful even today.

    The Ten Commandments of the Code of Chivalry
    From Chivalry by Leon Gautier

    I. Thou shalt believe all that the Church teaches, and shalt observe all its directions.
    II. Thou shalt defend the Church.
    III. Thou shalt repect all weaknesses, and shalt constitute thyself the defender of them.
    IV. Thou shalt love the country in the which thou wast born.
    V. Thou shalt not recoil before thine enemy.
    VI. Thou shalt make war against the Infidel without cessation, and without mercy.
    VII. Thou shalt perform scrupulously thy feudal duties, if they be not contrary to the laws of God.
    VIII. Thou shalt never lie, and shall remain faithful to thy pledged word.
    IX. Thou shalt be generous, and give largess to everyone.
    X. Thou shalt be everywhere and always the champion of the Right and the Good against Injustice and Evil.

    The Code of Chivalry
    From the Rifts: England Supplement

    I'm pretty sure I got this list somewhere else, but I haven't found out where. Still, some reference is better than none, so thanks to Jeremy Treanor for giving me this one.

    Live to serve King and Country.
    Live to defend Crown and Country and all it holds dear.
    Live one's life so that it is worthy of respect and honor.
    Live for freedom, justice and all that is good.
    Never attack an unarmed foe.
    Never use a weapon on an opponent not equal to the attack.
    Never attack from behind.
    Avoid lying to your fellow man.
    Avoid cheating.
    Avoid torture.
    Obey the law of king, country, and chivalry.
    Administer justice.
    Protect the innocent.
    Exhibit self control.
    Show respect to authority.
    Respect women.
    Exhibit Courage in word and deed.
    Defend the weak and innocent.
    Destroy evil in all of its monstrous forms.
    Crush the monsters that steal our land and rob our people.
    Fight with honor.
    Avenge the wronged.
    Never abandon a friend, ally, or noble cause.
    Fight for the ideals of king, country, and chivalry.
    Die with valor.
    Always keep one's word of honor.
    Always maintain one's principles.
    Never betray a confidence or comrade.
    Avoid deception.
    Respect life and freedom.
    Die with honor.
    Exhibit manners.
    Be polite and attentive.
    Be respectful of host, women, and honor.
    Loyalty to country, King, honor, freedom, and the code of chivalry.
    Loyalty to one's friends and those who lay their trust in thee.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Last Online
    Tuesday, April 25th, 2006 @ 01:22 AM
    Subrace
    The Other Seedline
    Location
    Granby Dookey of Lindstedtia
    Gender
    Age
    32
    Politics
    No-bless O'Bleeg
    Posts
    811
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    Post Re: Chivalry

    Quote Originally Posted by Pushkin
    The Code of Chivalry
    From the Rifts: England Supplement

    I'm pretty sure I got this list somewhere else, but I haven't found out where. Still, some reference is better than none, so thanks to Jeremy Treanor for giving me this one.

    Live to serve King and Country.
    Live to defend Crown and Country and all it holds dear.
    Live one's life so that it is worthy of respect and honor.
    Live for freedom, justice and all that is good.
    Never attack an unarmed foe.
    Never use a weapon on an opponent not equal to the attack.
    Never attack from behind.
    Avoid lying to your fellow man.
    Avoid cheating.
    Avoid torture.
    Obey the law of king, country, and chivalry.
    Administer justice.
    Protect the innocent.
    Exhibit self control.
    Show respect to authority.
    Respect women.
    Exhibit Courage in word and deed.
    Defend the weak and innocent.
    Destroy evil in all of its monstrous forms.
    Crush the monsters that steal our land and rob our people.
    Fight with honor.
    Avenge the wronged.
    Never abandon a friend, ally, or noble cause.
    Fight for the ideals of king, country, and chivalry.
    Die with valor.
    Always keep one's word of honor.
    Always maintain one's principles.
    Never betray a confidence or comrade.
    Avoid deception.
    Respect life and freedom.
    Die with honor.
    Exhibit manners.
    Be polite and attentive.
    Be respectful of host, women, and honor.
    Loyalty to country, King, honor, freedom, and the code of chivalry.
    Loyalty to one's friends and those who lay their trust in thee.
    I love this list! I think I already subconciously obey it, anyway.

    Strange that you didn't mention anything about courtly love, though!
    Chivalry also has a lot to do with the respect a gentleman has for a lady.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Last Online
    Thursday, August 20th, 2009 @ 12:11 AM
    Ethnicity
    Slavic
    Subrace
    Uralic/Alpine/Pontid mixed
    Country
    United States United States
    Location
    USA
    Gender
    Posts
    3,309
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    2
    Thanked in
    2 Posts

    Post Re: Chivalry

    Quote Originally Posted by Adélaïde
    Strange that you didn't mention anything about courtly love, though!
    Chivalry also has a lot to do with the respect a gentleman has for a lady.
    I already did a thread about Courtly Love
    http://www.forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?t=6826

  6. #6
    Senior Member Moody's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Last Online
    Tuesday, July 10th, 2012 @ 09:18 AM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    English
    Ancestry
    Albion
    Subrace
    Paleo-Atlantid
    Country
    United Kingdom United Kingdom
    State
    Essex Essex
    Location
    England
    Gender
    Family
    Single adult
    Occupation
    Investigator of Souls
    Politics
    Pan-Germanic Nationalist
    Religion
    Runosophy
    Posts
    1,904
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    9
    Thanked in
    9 Posts

    Post Re: Chivalry

    Quote Originally Posted by Pushkin
    I already did a thread about Courtly Love
    http://www.forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?t=6826
    Pushkin, there's a distinct lack of misogyny in those lists!
    What are you to do without your "scorn for woman"?
    Why are there beings at all, & why not rather nothing?
    [Leibniz/Heidegger]

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Last Online
    Thursday, August 20th, 2009 @ 12:11 AM
    Ethnicity
    Slavic
    Subrace
    Uralic/Alpine/Pontid mixed
    Country
    United States United States
    Location
    USA
    Gender
    Posts
    3,309
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    2
    Thanked in
    2 Posts

    Post Re: Chivalry

    Quote Originally Posted by Moody Lawless
    Pushkin, there's a distinct lack of misogyny in those lists!
    What are you to do without your "scorn for woman"?
    Well I'll let Scathach speak for me:

    http://www.forums.skadi.net/showpost...63&postcount=7

    "....in my experience of him, Pushkin is not really anti-women at all - merely that he wants a woman of his own moral calibre and dislikes the idiot slut girls that we all know make up a great percentage of young females, and as such couldn't be offensive to any girl of decent character - only to those of none, or of tenuous morals as such"

    http://www.forums.skadi.net/showpost...&postcount=125

    "Pushkin: Interesting man, sweeter than he lets on "

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Last Online
    Tuesday, April 25th, 2006 @ 01:22 AM
    Subrace
    The Other Seedline
    Location
    Granby Dookey of Lindstedtia
    Gender
    Age
    32
    Politics
    No-bless O'Bleeg
    Posts
    811
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    Post Re: Chivalry

    Quote Originally Posted by Pushkin
    Well I'll let Scathach speak for me:

    http://www.forums.skadi.net/showpost...63&postcount=7

    "....in my experience of him, Pushkin is not really anti-women at all - merely that he wants a woman of his own moral calibre and dislikes the idiot slut girls that we all know make up a great percentage of young females, and as such couldn't be offensive to any girl of decent character - only to those of none, or of tenuous morals as such"

    http://www.forums.skadi.net/showpost...&postcount=125

    "Pushkin: Interesting man, sweeter than he lets on "
    Ah, yes... Interesting. Your views on women seem to be a bit inconsistent. Half the time you're talking about how you're such a nice guy, how you hate how women always go for the jerks, how you don't hate ALL women (only the sluts!) But the other half the time, you act like you hate women, period!

    Seems like you'd be the kind of guy to alternately hold doors open for women, and slam doors in their faces.

    Of course, I am in still love with you, Pushkin! ()

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Last Online
    Thursday, August 20th, 2009 @ 12:11 AM
    Ethnicity
    Slavic
    Subrace
    Uralic/Alpine/Pontid mixed
    Country
    United States United States
    Location
    USA
    Gender
    Posts
    3,309
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    2
    Thanked in
    2 Posts

    Post Re: Chivalry

    Quote Originally Posted by Adélaïde
    Ah, yes... Interesting. Your views on women seem to be a bit inconsistent. Half the time you're talking about how you're such a nice guy, how you hate how women always go for the jerks, how you don't hate ALL women (only the sluts!) But the other half the time, you act like you hate women, period!

    Seems like you'd be the kind of guy to alternately hold doors open for women, and slam doors in their faces.
    Of course, I'm Ukrainian. The Russian/Ukrainian defies any definition and is often dualistic in his nature. I'll post some quotes later that explain this perfectly!

    Although a good(but extreme) example of this duality is when Ivan the Terrible killed his in a violent hateful rage one moment, and cried remorsefully over what he done the next.

    Of course, I am in still love with you, Pushkin! ()
    I know you are! I'm fond of you as well.

  10. #10
    Member Triglav's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Last Online
    Tuesday, April 25th, 2006 @ 12:24 PM
    Subrace
    Arya/Paleoeuropeidal (norda) :D
    Country
    European Union European Union
    Location
    European Union
    Gender
    Politics
    Fairness
    Posts
    2,405
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    2
    Thanked in
    2 Posts

    Post The Art of Chivalry: What Every Guy Should Know

    The Art of Chivalry:
    What Every Guy Should Know


    by Miss Love



    Save equality for the workplace. When it comes to dating, women want men to treat them like ladies: They want to feel adored, they want to be romanced. It may seem like an old-fashioned concept, but chivalry is nothing more than the willingness to treat a woman well.

    Flower Power

    Women love flowers. You've never met one who doesn't, and you never will. The ten bucks you spend on a bouquet will score you an infinite amount of points. And if you don't have ten bucks, pick some flowers out of a stranger's garden. It's cheaper but just as effective.

    After You

    Trust me when I say that there is nothing outdated about stepping aside and letting a woman walk through that door first. Whether you're walking into a ballroom or a grocery store, give her the right of way. Women remember the little things, and this is definitely something she'll file away.

    My Treat

    It's not recommended that you foot the bill on every date, but you should pick up the tab the first time. Don't let her pay, even if she offers. You'll be sending the signal that she's worth it, which she hopefully is.

    Armed and Ready

    Put your arm around her waist. You'll make her feel sexy and feminine by creating the feeling that you're there to protect her, that she's your girl (at least for the moment) and that everyone might as well know it. Works every time.

    Allow Me

    If she's thirsty, get her the glass of water. If she's cold, get her a sweater. Of course you're not at her beck and call, but it's important to cultivate the idea that you have her best interest in mind. Given time, she'll repay every one of your good deeds.
    "slavic" languages are absolutely arteficial (Read "slawenlegende"). The "glagolica", invented by a bunch of monks, is nothing but an ancient esperanto, creating new words, definitions and alphabet out of regional slangs.

    The craddle of European Civilization comes from the North. All blond people originate from the north. So if you see a blond-blue eyed Slovene, Russian, Czech, Polak ect., you can be 100% sure that his ancient ancestors originated from "Germanics" (Germanic = Nordic).
    "slovenja" was the settelment of the Langobards = Germanics/Teutons. "Poland" of the Goths and East-Vandals ect. ect. What do "slavs" tell us about their origin?
    Some silly story that they originate from some swamps in the east and popped out of no where into history.

    So you see my dear "Gorostan" [=Triglav], you are in reality a "Germanic" indoctrinated with panslav propaganda and historic fantasy stories. ~Dr. Brandt, former TNP and Skadi member

Page 1 of 10 123456 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Chivalry in the Battle Of Britain
    By SaxonPagan in forum Modern Age & Contemporary History
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: Saturday, April 21st, 2012, 07:06 PM
  2. Replies: 35
    Last Post: Friday, April 8th, 2011, 06:31 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •