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Thread: Luxemburg, Between Romance Europe and Germanic Europe

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stanley View Post
    My Luxembourgian ancestors identified as Germans from what I know, but whenever I hear about Luxembourg it's always about how they are a mix between the Germanic and Latin worlds.
    The more uppity Luxemburgians will often stress how it's a bridge between those worlds, how they have the best of France, the best of Germany and the best of Belgium. It's however a bit of hogwash, they're "Germans-in-denial" like us Austrians, the Liechtensteiners or the Swiss.

    Over the time, a large "preferebly Francophone" minority has formed there, however even they have a good command of German. It is not uncommon to have a Frenchified Germanic forename, or a French forename but German surname. French forename + surname is relatively rare outside the upper class.

    The language used for communication is however still Letzebuergesch, a Moselle Franconian dialect of German, I have never heard any of the Luxemburgians I know speak French to each other; with the exception of the high numbers of foreigners (43,2%! - a third of which are of Portuguese background)

    This has led to a remarkable language chaos in some areas of life: For instance, in a court proceeding, you will often find parties speaking Letzebuergesch in the courtroom, whilst the proceedings are held in High German and the laws are written in French.

    The position that laws must be written in French was introduced after "liberation" from NS Germany in 1944. It is also the time when the official spelling became Luxembourg rather than Luxemburg, a reason why all self-conscious Germanics should use the original and still permissible spelling and as it is still spelt in German.

    That all being said, from my experience, the Luxemburgers also have very cute girls.
    -In kalte Schatten versunken... /Germaniens Volk erstarrt / Gefroren von Lügen / In denen die Welt verharrt-
    -Die alte Seele trauernd und verlassen / Verblassend in einer erklärbaren Welt / Schwebend in einem Dunst der Wehmut / Ein Schrei der nur unmerklich gellt-
    -Auch ich verspüre Demut / Vor dem alten Geiste der Ahnen / Wird es mir vergönnt sein / Gen Walhalla aufzufahren?-

    (Heimdalls Wacht, In kalte Schatten versunken, stanzas 4-6)

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    Luxemburg is a state. German is a nationality. There are a majority of Germans in Germany, Luxemburg, Alsace, Switzerland, Liechtenstein, and Austria. Before German unification, one might be from Waldeck, Anhalt, or Saxony, but all were German. Luxemburg, however, was tossed in with the United Netherlands for some reason, when they were deciding borders at the Congress of Vienna. When Belgium broke away from the Netherlands in the 1830s, the German speaking half of Luxemburg also broke away to form its own nation state. So it has an odd history, and in a way is a relic of the Holy Roman Empire, but they are still Germans.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sigurd View Post
    It is not uncommon to have a Frenchified Germanic forename, or a French forename but German surname.
    I've noticed this in the Francophone area of Switzerland as well, which is evidence to me of a sort of suppressed Germanicness common to all those border areas. Pictures of "French" Burgundian and Lotharingian farm families from the WW1 era I've seen reveal people whose look and dress would not be out of place in the Rhineland, though of course their loyalties and perhaps their language was usurped by France between 1500 and 1800.
    Most people think as they are trained to think, and most people make a majority.

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    Thumbs Up LUXEMBURG (Luxembourg) - Great Thread

    Thanks for posting this as its that little country you can drive across in 40 minutes supposedly and a fascinating and beautiful place.

    The position that laws must be written in French was introduced after "liberation" from NS Germany in 1944. It is also the time when the official spelling became Luxembourg rather than Luxemburg, a reason why all self-conscious Germanics should use the original and still permissible spelling and as it is still spelt in German.
    To write the name of the country with 'Bourg' at the end rather than Germanic 'Burg' is obviously an anti-German stance post WW2, as the native language of this country is not French but a variant of German. Personally I always write it as Luxemburg and have occasionally been told I am spelling it incorrectly whereas its quite historically correct in the English language context of Luxemburg. English as a language is Germanic and in most cases follows the German spelling unless the elitists decide otherwise such as the debacle post WW2 insisting on Slavic place names to be known as English for the annexed eastern German territories.. ie: Kolberg is naturally phonetic to the English speaking tongue whereas Kolobrzeg certainly is not, another example would be Brno which in English is supposed to be Brunn.

    There was a previous thread outlining the obvious attractions of Luxemburg for Germanics worldwide whom are seeking a secure region for themselves and their families. No doubt Luxemburg would appeal to oppressed white Afrikaners in the heart of central western Europa.

    @Sigurd.. Wheres the Thread for pictures of cute Letzebürgisch ladies
    Last edited by Untersberger; Thursday, August 11th, 2011 at 06:22 PM. Reason: spellcheck
    Wahrheit Macht Freiheit.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Huginn ok Muninn View Post
    Luxemburg is a state. German is a nationality. There are a majority of Germans in Germany, Luxemburg, Alsace, Switzerland, Liechtenstein, and Austria. Before German unification, one might be from Waldeck, Anhalt, or Saxony, but all were German. Luxemburg, however, was tossed in with the United Netherlands for some reason, when they were deciding borders at the Congress of Vienna. When Belgium broke away from the Netherlands in the 1830s, the German speaking half of Luxemburg also broke away to form its own nation state. So it has an odd history, and in a way is a relic of the Holy Roman Empire, but they are still Germans.
    So Luxemburg as a state, was very similar to Bavaria, Prussia, Saxony, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern etc. historically, a German people's state, however the main difference is that it didn't become included in the German empire in 1871?

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    That many people from Luxemburg today don't self-identify as german anymore, is the result of the divide & conquer strategy utilized by our friends in the West (just like they made sure that Österreich isn't reunited with Deutschland). The more divided the german people are, the less resistance they can offer. That's why suddenly german dialects are declared to be "independent languages". France has a long history of swallowing up german regions.

    Quote Originally Posted by Untersberger View Post
    To write the name of the country with 'Bourg' at the end rather than Germanic 'Burg' is obviously an anti-German stance post WW2, as the native language of this country is not French but a variant of German. Personally I always write it as Luxemburg and have occasionally been told I am spelling it incorrectly whereas its quite historically correct in the English language context of Luxemburg. English as a language is Germanic and in most cases follows the German spelling unless the elitists decide otherwise such as the debacle post WW2 insisting on Slavic place names to be known as English for the annexed eastern German territories.. ie: Kolberg is naturally phonetic to the English speaking tongue whereas Kolobrzeg certainly is not, another example would be Brno which in English is supposed to be Brunn.
    The same is also taking place on the german wiki pages of many of these former german cities - it's as if they want to erase the memories of these places too. Now many historically german cities like Kolberg are entered on wikipedia under their distorted slavic names ('Kołobrzeg'), while historically slavic cities like 'Warszawa' and 'Lwiw' are still named 'Warschau' and 'Lemberg' - somehow quite absurd.

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    As an example, that´s a Luxemburger speaking Letzeburgerisch:

    Letzrburgerisch

    Well, I can understand around 80% and it sounds like a mix of German and Dutch with some words of French-like pronunciation.

    "Judge of your natural character by what you do in your dreams" - Ralph Waldo Emerson

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    Luxemburgisch..

    Days of the week in Luxemburgish !!

    Days of the Week: Luxembourgish Lesson

    Donnerstag - High German
    Donderdag - Dutch
    Donneschdeg - Luxemburgisch


    Certainly most very Germanic as a Language
    Wahrheit Macht Freiheit.
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    HISTORY IS NOT HISTORY - UNLESS IT IS THE 100% TRUTH

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    Germanically Correct

    Which of the following appears more Germanically Correct?

    Luxembourg or Luxemburg

    Obvious isn't it yet most English speakers would never know this.

    Some might prefer the French version but historically the spelling Luxembourg is incorrect.
    Wahrheit Macht Freiheit.
    http://www.rheinwiesenlager.de
    HISTORY IS NOT HISTORY - UNLESS IT IS THE 100% TRUTH

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    Quote Originally Posted by Huginn ok Muninn View Post
    When Belgium broke away from the Netherlands in the 1830s, the German speaking half of Luxemburg also broke away to form its own nation state.
    Luxemburg did not brake away from the Netherlands. They remained under the rule of the head of the House of Oranje-Nassau until king Willem III did had not any surviving male heirs and then the throne passed on to his brother. Until that time there was a personal union with the Netherlands. And before Napoleon it was part of the Southern Netherlands that where first in hands of the Spanish Hapsburg line and later the Austrian branch.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thusnelda View Post
    As an example, that´s a Luxemburger speaking Letzeburgerisch:

    Letzrburgerisch

    Well, I can understand around 80% and it sounds like a mix of German and Dutch with some words of French-like pronunciation.
    Yes, it sounds like German interspersed with French words. Overall, to my untrained and unfamiliar ear, it sounds like a dialect of High German.

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