Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Thread: The Egtved Girl (Nordic Bronze Age)

  1. #1
    Schimmelreiter
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Hauke Haien's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Last Online
    Monday, September 4th, 2017 @ 09:59 AM
    Ethnicity
    Deutsch
    Location
    Land der Deutschen
    Gender
    Posts
    1,841
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    22
    Thanked in
    19 Posts

    The Egtved Girl (Nordic Bronze Age)


    The Egtved Girl (c. 1390–1370 BC) was a Nordic Bronze Age girl whose well-preserved remains were found at Egtved (55°37′N 9°18′E), Denmark in 1921. Aged 16–18 at death, she was slim, 160 cm tall (about 5 ft 3 in), had long blonde hair and well-trimmed nails. Her burial has been dated by dendrochronology to 1370 BC. She was discovered in a barrow approximately 30 metres wide and 4 metres high.


    Burial

    The barrow was excavated in 1921, and an east-western aligned coffin was found. It was transported in sealed condition to the National Museum of Denmark in Copenhagen, where it was opened and the Egtved Girl discovered.

    She was buried fully dressed on a cowhide in the coffin. She wore a loose bodice with sleeves reaching the elbow. She had a bare waist and wore a short string skirt. She had bronze bracelets and a woolen belt with a large disc decorated with spirals and a spike. At her feet were the cremated remains of a child age 5–6. By her head, there was a small birch bark box which contained an awl, bronze pins and a hair net.

    Before the coffin was closed she was covered with a blanket and a cowhide. Flowering yarrow (indicating a summer burial) and a bucket of beer made of wheat, honey, bog-myrtle and cowberries were placed atop. Her distinctive outfit, which caused a sensation when it was unearthed in the 1920s, is the best preserved example of a style now known to be common in Northern Europe during the Bronze Age. The good preservation of Egtved girl is due to the acidic bog conditions of the soil, which is a common condition of this locale.


    Reconstruction

    The outfit was reconstructed for the National Museum of Denmark by the Lejre Experimental Centre and is on display there. A reconstructed set of clothes, as well as details of the excavation, are on display in the Egtved Girl's museum at the excavation site.

    The Egtved Girl


    Today, the reconstructed grave mound – 22 ms in diameter and four ms high – can be seen along with a small museum that describes the finding. In addition, a copy of the Egtved Girl’s coffin including dress, jewellery and buckle, etc. is displayed. The originals are on display at the Danish National Museum in Copenhagen.

    The surrounding landscape has been planted to look like it did in the bronze-age.

    A bronze-age festival “In the steps of the Egtved Girl” is held at the Egtved Girl’s grave every year in July. A live Egtved Girl tells stories and dances, followed by the sounding of lures.
    http://www.visitbillund.dk/danmark/d...tm?CallerUrl=2

    Burial customs changed considerably in the Bronze Age. Mounds became larger, perhaps as leaders and ruling dynasties began to emerge; it is fairly said that "More work was done on buildings for the dead than ever before in our history", and that the building effort for Bronze Age tombs "bear(s) comparison only with that of medieval churches" (Erikson, Lofman, A Scandinavian Saga, p. 95). The tremendous effort and expense of building the mounds and supplying the dead with their gold and bronze grave goods suggests a relatively high level of social stratification, an intense religious influence, and probably a considerable degree of worship of the dead. Some of the dead were buried in large oak coffins, which, combined with the peaty soil of Denmark, preserved the bodies and clothing remarkably well. The dead were buried fully equipped, often with very rich goods, and food and drink sent with them. One, the Egtved girl, was laid in her howe with a bark bucket that had been filled with a fermented honey-wheat-cranberry mead flavoured with bog myrtle. At her feet were the burned bones of a young girl, probably a serving-maid sent into the mound with her mistress (The Mound People, p. 60). Fresh yarrow flowers were also laid in the coffin, perhaps for magical purposes. The child in Guldhøj was buried with three crab-apples, which may have been meant to give it life in the Otherworld; the chieftain whose coffin lay beside the child's had six small split hazel-sticks by his dagger, which Gløb also interprets as a magico-religious grave-gift (The Mound People, pp. 92-94). In the later Bronze Age, cremation became common, and mound-building much less so.
    Ritual dance seems to have been practised by the women of the Bronze Age, as shown by the stone carvings and bronze figures of acrobat-women clad only in string skirts. Their positions are similar to some of those used by current-day belly-dancers, and it has also been pointed out by the modern-day shaman Annete Høst (personal conversation, Solmonth 1993) that the positioning of the round bronze stomach-disks worn by Bronze Age women would have been ideal for ecstatic ritual dance of that type.
    Source: Paganality.com

    The principal sources of information on Bronze Age clothing are surviving garments, mainly from Nordic coffin graves, the devices used to fasten clothing (fibulae, pins and buttons), and artistic depictions, in two or in three dimensions. An important accompaniment to the clothing was the ornaments that adorned parts of the body or the surface of the clothing; it is these items that constitute the largest single body of evidence available, since they were usually made of metal and therefore survived where clothing has not. The clothing from coffin graves, mainly in Denmark, has been subject of intensive study over a long period (fig. 11.2). Males in these coffins, which mostly belong to Period II, wear a kilt-like tunic, sometimes a loin-cloth, a cloak, cap and leather shoes consisting of an oblong or square piece of leather cut into flaps at the toes, with the lace pulled through and round the foot. Guldhøj barrow contained part of a cloth shoe with sewn-on leather sole. Females wear either a corded skirt and jacket (Egtved) or a blouse and long skirt, a belt with bronze disc, socks and leather shoes, and also a hair-band or hair-net. Much attention has been focused on the more unusual garments, for instance the skirt worn by the young woman in the Egtved mound, formed of a continuous twisted cord looped up and down and gathered at the bottom; it was short (well above knee length), but wound twice round the body - the wearer presumably compensated for chilliness of calves and knees brought about by the shortness of the mini-skirt by making sure her upper thighs were warm. An element of Scandinavian dress was formed by the bronze hanging-bowls that form a regular part of the grave-goods of the Period IV. These have been seen as a means of gathering the folds of a dress on the back; the tutulus (disc with protruding knob) was used for a similar purpose at the front.

    The figurines give additional information about dress, mostly female. The short corded skirt is shown a number of times: these individuals seem to have worn little else except ornaments, but it is likely that they are depictions of special people or special activities, not of everyday wear. These figures also indicate that the hair was elaborately coiffured and held in place with a band or net, just as has been found in the Borum Eshøj grave.
    Source: A. F. Harding, European Societies in the Bronze Age, p. 371
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  2. #2
    Lost in Melancholia
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Thusnelda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Ethnicity
    Bavarian tribe
    Ancestry
    Bavarian
    Subrace
    Nordid-Borreby
    State
    Bavaria Bavaria
    Location
    Over the hills and far away
    Gender
    Age
    34
    Occupation
    Breathing the forest
    Politics
    Regionalist-conservative
    Religion
    Ásatrú/Forn Siðr
    Posts
    4,380
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    37
    Thanked in
    26 Posts
    I didn´t knew about this archeological sensation until now. Thanks for sharing. Another proof for the progressiveness of the culture of our ancestors.

    "Judge of your natural character by what you do in your dreams" - Ralph Waldo Emerson

  3. #3
    Senior Member Neophyte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Last Online
    Tuesday, October 29th, 2019 @ 11:11 PM
    Ethnicity
    Scandinavian
    Subrace
    Nordic + some Atlantid
    Country
    Sweden Sweden
    Gender
    Age
    46
    Family
    Single adult
    Politics
    Blut und Boden
    Posts
    1,935
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    50
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    43
    Thanked in
    28 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Valkyrie View Post
    I didn´t knew about this archeological sensation until now. Thanks for sharing. Another proof for the progressiveness of the culture of our ancestors.
    Progressiveness? My interpretation is that we now as we are shedding the remnants of Christianity etc. etc. are reverting back to the same patterns that our ancestors followed 3500 years ago. That is not being progressive, but reactionary. Thus the miniskirt and the skimpy top are some of the most reactionary clothes a girl can wear today.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Last Online
    Monday, August 6th, 2012 @ 08:12 AM
    Ethnicity
    German/Irish
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    Texas Texas
    Gender
    Age
    43
    Family
    Single
    Occupation
    Computer CAD/ Civil
    Politics
    Libertarian/Conservative
    Posts
    1,773
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    2
    Thanked in
    2 Posts
    Yeah! I noticed its resemblance to a modern Mini Skirt and Top. But that may be just a coincidence.

  5. #5
    Mein Glaube ist die Liebe zu meinem Volk. Juthunge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Last Online
    11 Minutes Ago @ 12:31 AM
    Ethnicity
    German
    Ancestry
    German
    Subrace
    Keltic Nordid-CM
    Gender
    Religion
    Religion of the Blood
    Posts
    1,601
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    376
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    558
    Thanked in
    242 Posts
    Danish Bronze Age girl may have been German

    One of Denmark's proudest relics may not be Danish after all, researchers have found.

    In a feat of laboratory sleuthing, scientists on Thursday provided a background to a mysterious Bronze Age teenager who died in modern-day Denmark 3,400 years ago.
    The "Egtved Girl," uncovered at a village in the Jutland peninsula, was probably born in southwestern Germany and may have been married off to cement ties between powerful families, they said.

    One of Denmark's proudest relics, the Egtved Girl was found in 1921 at a burial mound, inside an oak coffin that dates her interment to a summer's day in the year 1370 BC.
    She was aged between 16 and 18 at the time of death and would have been around 1.6 metres (five feet three inches) tall. Her bones had dissolved in the acidic water in the coffin, but her blond hair, teeth, well-trimmed nails and parts of the brain and skin were extraordinarily preserved, along with her woollen garments and a disc-shaped bronze belt plate symbolising the Sun.

    Buried alongside her head was a small container with some cremated bones of a five- to six-year-old child.
    The site and her clothes clearly pointed to a person who was cherished and of high rank. But who was she? And where did she come from?
    Seeking an answer, researchers led by Karin Margarita Frei from the National Museum of Denmark and Centre for Textile Research analysed the precious find for levels of the radioactive element strontium.

    Strontium exists naturally in the Earth's crust, with its radioactivity varying in strength according to location. In humans and animals, the element becomes absorbed through local water and vegetables.
    Thus by measuring levels of the isotopes in ancient remains, scientists can gain a useful clue of where that individual or animal had lived.

    Black Forest
    One of the girl's first molars, a tooth that was fully formed when she was aged three or four, had a strontium signature in the enamel that showed she had not grown up in Jutland, the study said.

    Instead, it matched a "geologically older" region -- most probably the Black Forest area of southwestern Germany, a whole 800 kilometres (500 miles) to the south.

    Strontium levels in the girl's 23-cm (10-inch) -long hair and her nails were also revealing.
    Around 13 to 15 months before her death, she stayed in a place with a strontium signature "very similar" to where she was raised.
    She then likely moved to another location -- possibly Jutland -- and after spending nine or 10 months there travelled back home. She stayed there for four to six months before travelling to what is now Egtved, but died about a month later.

    There are other candidates for the girl's home region, including Sweden and Norway and the geologically old Danish island of Bornholm.
    But southwestern Germany is by far the best bet, according to the study, which appears in the journal Scientific Reports.


    The wool in her clothing has strontium levels that vary greatly from thread to thread, said Frei.
    "This proves that the wool was made from sheep that either grazed in different geographical areas or that they grazed in one vast area with very complex geology," she said. "Black Forest's bedrock is characterized by a similarly heterogenous strontium isotopic range."

    Other clues also help to build an identity for the enigmatic girl, said Kristian Kristiansen of the University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    "In Bronze Age western Europe, southern Germany and Denmark were the two dominant centres of power, very similar to kingdoms," he said.
    Trade between Jutland and southwestern Germany at the time was lucrative.

    An alloy of tin and copper, bronze was the wonder metal of the age, made by metallurgists in Greece and the Middle East.
    In return, these regions in Mediterranean coveted Danish amber, valuing the mineral as much as gold. Middlemen in Germany acted as the go-between in the trade.
    "We find many direct connections between the two (regions) in the archaeological evidence," said Cristiansen. "My guess is that the Egtved Girl was a southern German girl who was given in marriage to a man in Jutland so as to forge an alliance between two powerful families."
    Source(The Local)
    Original Study(Tracing the dynamic life story of a Bronze Age Female)


    Note however, according to the author of the study, while the material of her clothing was foreign, the style was not:
    Moreover, Frei says, the girl’s clothes were typical of the local culture in Denmark, even though the animals they were made from lived elsewhere. “I think that she tried to integrate herself into the local society by having a local-looking outfit, but made of raw material that came from far away and most likely from her place of origin.”
    And the day they sold us out, Our hearts grew cold
    'Cause we were never asked, No brother, we were told!
    What do they know of Europe, Who only Europe know?



    Ancient DNA: List of All Studies analyzing DNA of Ancient Tribes and Ethnicities(post-2010)


  6. #6
    Funding Member
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Nachtengel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Last Online
    @
    Ethnicity
    German
    Gender
    Posts
    5,916
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    94
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    765
    Thanked in
    420 Posts

    Famous Bronze Age Dane Was 'Immigrant': Research

    A Bronze Age woman whose remains were uncovered in a famous 1930s archaeological discovery in southern Denmark migrated to the country from distant lands, new research has revealed.
    A groundbreaking new study has shown that the Skrydstrup Girl, who was discovered in a burial mound in 1935, was neither born nor raised in Denmark.

    The new information about the famous Bronze Age remains was revealed on national broadcaster DR’s big-budget documentary series Historien om Danmark (The History of Denmark).

    “This is going to change a whole lot about our understanding of the entire Bronze Age,” Professor Karin Margarita Frei of the National Museum of Denmark says in the programme.

    Frei is leader of a research team that will publish a paper later this year, reports DR.

    In 2015, another famous Danish preserved body, the Egtved girl, also caused a stir when it was discovered that she originated from southern Germany rather than territory within modern-day Denmark.

    This adds to the fascination of the new Skrydstrup girl discovery, reports DR.

    “The result is important because it shows that the Egtved girl was not a freak occurrence. It appears there is a pattern that is telling us how people, and in this instance women, moved around during the Bronze Age,” Frei, who also led the Egtved girl study, told the broadcaster.

    Researchers found that the Skrydstrup girl arrived in Denmark at the age of 13 or 14, before which she lived in a region “several hundred kilometres” away – possibly the Czech Republic, France or central Germany.

    The young woman lived in the area around Skydstrup for four years before dying as a 17-year-old in around 1300 BCE, according to the DR report.

    Remnants of tooth, bone and hair enabled researchers to map out the life of the woman in a way not possible with previous finds such as the Egtved girl.

    “Her burial place in Denmark suggests that she was a member of society’s elite, probably from prior to her arrival. For example, her teeth tell us that she had a nutritious diet from a young age, which can be a mark of high status,” Frei said.

    The sudden long-distance migration may be the sign of an alliance between tribes or an arranged marriage, Frei told DR.

    Kristian Kristiansen, professor in archaeology at Stockholm University, told DR that the results of the study are significant for understanding the Bronze Age.

    “The Skrydstrup girl shows that the Bronze Age was a globalised era. People moved from south to north because of marriage, and went on long trade journeys. Archaeology has long shown this, but now we also have evidence from the natural sciences that it was the case,” said Kristiansen.

    More about the Bronze Age research of Frei and the National Museum of Denmark can be found here.
    https://www.thelocal.dk/20170410/fam...grant-research

  7. #7
    Anachronism "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Huginn ok Muninn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Ethnicity
    Germanic
    Ancestry
    Germany, Norway, England
    Subrace
    Nordeby
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    Texas Texas
    Gender
    Zodiac Sign
    Leo
    Family
    Single adult
    Politics
    Farther right than you.
    Posts
    3,051
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    624
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    755
    Thanked in
    360 Posts


    "All we have to do is label some German princess an 'immigrant' because she moved to Denmark and married a Dane, and that will be the argument for flooding Denmark with 4639468340658945069840659840 Negroes, because they are 'immigrants' too, and therefore just like Egtved Girl!"
    Most people think as they are trained to think, and most people make a majority.

  8. #8
    Mein Glaube ist die Liebe zu meinem Volk. Juthunge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Last Online
    11 Minutes Ago @ 12:31 AM
    Ethnicity
    German
    Ancestry
    German
    Subrace
    Keltic Nordid-CM
    Gender
    Religion
    Religion of the Blood
    Posts
    1,601
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    376
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    558
    Thanked in
    242 Posts
    To be honest, that there was much movement within wider Central-Northern Europe during the Bronze Age has long been known to anyone halfway familiar with archaeology or genetics. These times predate the formation of halfway stable ethnicities by centuries.
    Kristiansen says as much himself: “The Skrydstrup girl shows that the Bronze Age was a globalised era. People moved from south to north because of marriage, and went on long trade journeys. Archaeology has long shown this, but now we also have evidence from the natural sciences that it was the case.”

    Though using “globalised” in this context is quite ridiculous, at least in this case I don’t think they have an agenda with it. Technically she was indeed an immigrant and that they at least used quotation marks, kind of shows that they don't compare it to modern immigration.
    And the day they sold us out, Our hearts grew cold
    'Cause we were never asked, No brother, we were told!
    What do they know of Europe, Who only Europe know?



    Ancient DNA: List of All Studies analyzing DNA of Ancient Tribes and Ethnicities(post-2010)


  9. #9
    Senior Member Neophyte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Last Online
    Tuesday, October 29th, 2019 @ 11:11 PM
    Ethnicity
    Scandinavian
    Subrace
    Nordic + some Atlantid
    Country
    Sweden Sweden
    Gender
    Age
    46
    Family
    Single adult
    Politics
    Blut und Boden
    Posts
    1,935
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    50
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    43
    Thanked in
    28 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by EQ Fighter View Post
    Yeah! I noticed its resemblance to a modern Mini Skirt and Top. But that may be just a coincidence.
    I think that pretty girls were just as interested in showing off their legs 3,500 years ago as their descendants are today.

  10. #10
    Schimmelreiter
    "Friend of Germanics"
    Skadi Funding Member

    Hauke Haien's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Last Online
    Monday, September 4th, 2017 @ 09:59 AM
    Ethnicity
    Deutsch
    Location
    Land der Deutschen
    Gender
    Posts
    1,841
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    22
    Thanked in
    19 Posts


    It has been speculated that the Egtved Girl came to Denmark as part of some religious cult or through a dynastic marriage and I think that both is true. During her time, we are talking about societies firmly ruled by Indo-Europeans, perhaps with incipient Germanic characteristics in the northern half of the former Unetice culture and further north from there. The Egtved Girl is about 500-600 years younger and more southern than the lords of Leubingen, Dieskau and Helmsdorf and her place of origin is assumed to be outside of the area that turned out to be Germanic in later history. We cannot be sure who ruled the Black Forest during that time, but when Ariovist crosses the Rhine and confronts Caesar in the first century, he is perhaps continuing a process of Germanic expansion that reached the region during the upheavals surrounding the Cimbrian Wars of the second century, seizing the area from the Celts and developing it by cutting deeper into the forest.

    However, more than a thousand years earlier we are still talking about dialects of a common Indo-European language and culture and these sacred lords who ruled at the time had a web of family connections and relationships much like the later saga heroes (see The Lay of Hyndla) or indeed the European nobility, who still ruled by divine right in their own time. Her dress is featured on female figurines in ritual poses (like the Grevensvænge figurines) and whether she is an itinerant priestess or a princess, her burial is certainly of the highest status and it is therefore naive to assume that her dress signals sexual availability.

    Alongside the Trundholm sun chariot, Kiviksgraven and the Golden Hat of Schifferstadt, which are roughly contemporary with her, we should think of her as an item of Indo-European religion, inextricably connected to cosmological beliefs first demonstrated by the Nebra sky disk of the Early Bronze Age and the Goseck circle of the Neolithic period, and continuing into the foundations of Germanic religion and identity.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Best Books on the Nordic Bronze Age and Pre-Roman Iron Age?
    By Theudiskaz in forum Germanic & Indo-Germanic Origins
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: Tuesday, May 29th, 2018, 04:37 AM
  2. The British Bronze Age, or Beaker Type
    By Glenlivet in forum Europoid
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: Sunday, July 15th, 2007, 11:27 PM
  3. Bronze Age Settlement in Shropshire
    By Frans_Jozef in forum Archaeology
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Monday, May 16th, 2005, 01:28 PM
  4. Replies: 3
    Last Post: Wednesday, November 17th, 2004, 07:13 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •