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Thread: Surnames that are the same in both German and English

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    Senior Member Anfang's Avatar
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    Arrow Surnames that are the same in both German and English

    Surnames that are essentially the same in both German And English. I will start:

    Wagner
    Knot (Knott)
    Wolf, Wolfe (Wulf)
    York
    Walter
    Fisher
    Brown
    Petersen

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anfang View Post
    Surnames that are essentially the same in Both German And English.
    York

    Fisher

    Brown
    These are no German surnames exactly. "York" is totally unknown here. "Fisher" goes by "Fischer". And "Brown" goes by "Braun".

    "Judge of your natural character by what you do in your dreams" - Ralph Waldo Emerson

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    Senior Member Dunkeld's Avatar
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    I think Anfang thought of including names that are very similar, too.

    So I add Miller/Müller/Möller

    and Smith/Schmidt/Schmid usw ....

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    Senior Member Anfang's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Valkyrie View Post
    These are no German surnames exactly. "York" is totally unknown here. "Fisher" goes by "Fischer". And "Brown" goes by "Braun".

    Obviously, they are still the same names lingusitically and etymologically. Come on... Wolf and Wulf are also the same.

    As far as York One of the generals Hung by the Hitler regime for the July 44 plot was named York. Ludwig York von Wartenburg- Graff
    It is a Junker name

    Johann Yorck Von Warttenburg.
    http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/...von-Wartenburg

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    Senior Member Anfang's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dunkeld View Post
    I think Anfang that of including names that are very similar, too.

    So I add Miller/Müller/Möller

    and Smith/Schmidt/Schmid usw ....


    Genau . The pronunciation meaning and etymology is pretty much the same.
    In berlin real oldtime berliners said Ike instead of Ich. we all understood it was ich. Miller/Müller/Möller is equally the same but with variation.

    maybe someone has other names!

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    Senior Member Dunkeld's Avatar
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    And then there is the famous Yorck family. A Yorck played a part in the war between Napoleon and Prussia.

    Lots of places and streets in Germany are named after this Yorck.

    Und here are other Yorcks:

    http://www.yorck.de/yck/yorck_ie/yor...yorck_home.php

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    Some names with the same meaning sound the same even if the spelling is different. Brown & Braun, Haus & House. Fuchs & Fox. At least I think it means fox in German, it's pronounce Fox in America. Fuchs got me in trouble years ago as a kid when at a cemetary I saw it on a headstone & blurted it out the way I thought it was suppose to be pronounced ().Schmidt & Smith, I have relatives on my mothers side name Schmidt but they pronunce it Smith.

    Some German names had their pronounciations changed in America because of the different rules of pronouciation between German & English. Many families just changed the spelling so the Anglo-Ameircans could pronounce it correctly. For example Krutz became Cruise. Though were I live some families still have the original spelling & pronouciation but newcomers will always get it wrong the first time they say the names.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Æmeric View Post
    Some names with the same meaning sound the same even if the spelling is different. Brown & Braun, Haus & House. Fuchs & Fox. At least I think it means fox in German, it's pronounce Fox in America. Fuchs got me in trouble years ago as a kid when at a cemetary I saw it on a headstone & blurted it out the way I thought it was suppose to be pronounced ().Schmidt & Smith, I have relatives on my mothers side name Schmidt but they pronunce it Smith.

    Some German names had their pronounciations changed in America because of the different rules of pronouciation between German & English. Many families just changed the spelling so the Anglo-Ameircans could pronounce it correctly. For example Krutz became Cruise. Though were I live some families still have the original spelling & pronouciation but newcomers will always get it wrong the first time they say the names.

    someone I worked worked with misprononced a custumers name to thieir face. The name was Griesse-Dick.
    hello Mr ............

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    I don't think Wagner is an English surname. When it appears in America it is probably of German origin but simple to pronounce & spell for native English speakers so there is an assumption it is/might be English. Wagner has a fpm of 2741.28 in Germany, 718.92 in America but barely registers in the UK. Wagoner is probably an Anglo-Americanization of Wagner as according to http://www.publicprofiler.org/worldnames/Default.aspx, Wagoner has a fpm of 64.48 in the US, 4.58 in Canada but barely registers in Europe.

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    hi
    ,Here are some modest explanations on Wagner my surname

    L origin of the name is saxone is in Saxony where the first one Wagner appearsis a workname is which means the cartwright the manufacturer of tank his heraldique symbol is the wheel it appears on my weapons the blason (shield) of my family For England is the Saxon which(who) l ones imported invaded and creating seigneuries and castels of the lords Wagner existed of memory in Devonshire
    Wagner n is no name Angles but is certainly Anglo-Saxon

    Wagner and varying Vagner Wagnier Wagoner and Wagenaer ( nederland )

    As for the United States d amerique a strong population d allemants and d Alsatians the times of helping scarcities have emigré on c ette new earth(ground) arqueboutant on force them of work and their warlike spirit in hostile parts of the country bears and Indian
    in brief hard in bad and hard in the work

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