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Thread: "Your Father Was a Monster"

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    Senior Member BeornWulfWer's Avatar
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    "Your Father Was a Monster"



    Dec. 10, 2008 | Monika Hertwig knew very little about her father until she went to see Steven Spielberg's film "Schindler's List." According to Hertwig, no one in Germany talked about the Second World War. Her grandmother had told her, when she was 11, that her father was hanged for killing Jews as the head of the Plaszow concentration camp in Krakow, Poland. But she didn't fully grasp her father's unconscionable acts until 1993, when Spielberg's film came out. The moment Ralph Fiennes' character was introduced, Hertwig recognized him. Then she sat in the dark for hours, feeling, in her words, "sick with the truth."

    In the POV documentary "Inheritance" (premieres 9 p.m. Dec. 10 on PBS), filmmaker James Moll unveils the story of how Hertwig, now in her 60s, discovered the unthinkable horrors of her father's legacy. She never knew her father, who died when she was 1 year old, and she'd never gotten along with her mother, who once told her in anger that she was just like her father and would die like him, too. But when Hertwig saw a German documentary about the Holocaust featuring a woman named Helen Jonas who'd been a servant in Amon Goeth's house, Hertwig became intent on meeting Jonas to learn more about her father and to understand why her mother had stayed by his side, as his mistress, during those years.

    Jonas, who was 15 when Goeth plucked her out of the concentration camp and made her his servant, was hesitant to meet with Hertwig, but eventually agreed to do so for the sake of closure. As the cameras roll, the two come face to face for the first time at the Plaszow camp memorial. Their interaction is uncomfortable and upsetting for both, but most of all, it's eye-opening for Hertwig, who still seems to believe some of her mother's fabrications and rationalizations about Goeth's actions.

    "He only killed some Jews because of sanitary problems," Hertwig reports that her mother had told her.

    "Monika, I have to stop you right now," Helen interrupts. "From now on, you can see the ignorance. We were tortured and killed because we were Jews." "I am not my father," Hertwig told filmmaker Moll when they first spoke, but she seems far less resolute about this fact when she's face to face with Jonas, a woman who not only suffered regular beatings at her father's hand, but also witnessed how the man would arbitrarily select prisoners to be killed and tortured.

    "He was a monster. He was a living monster. He enjoyed what he was doing," Jonas tearily tells Hertwig as they tour the house where Jonas lived with Goeth. Goeth personally shot Jonas' boyfriend, a fellow prisoner, right after the boyfriend had finished burying Jonas' mother, who'd become sick and died in the camp. As a result, Jonas never knew where her mother was laid to rest. Hertwig struggles to maintain her composure in the face of these terrible stories, but several times she ends up wringing her hands or breaking down in tears instead.

    A straightforward but nonetheless emotionally wrenching narrative of two intersecting lives, POV's "Inheritance" provides an unvarnished look at how one man's actions over 60 years ago continue to cripple those he left behind. These women's attempts to find peace in reaching out to each other forms a memorable (if at times uneasy) chronicle of the immense difficulty of coming to grips with a horrifying past.

    "For Helen, it's time to bring closure. But it was not closure for me," says Hertwig. "I think it was the beginning of another life; a life where I'm able to live with the truth."
    Source

    First mistake was initially watching 'Schindler's List' before seeking the actual truth first. Her second was going to speak with a hysterical attention seeker.

    The woman looks absolutely haunted.
    "The only way to get smarter is to play a smarter opponent."

    _________________

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    Schimmelreiter
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    Hauke Haien's Avatar
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    "I am not my father," Hertwig told filmmaker Moll when they first spoke, but she seems far less resolute about this fact when she's face to face with Jonas
    Hertwig's problem is that she tries to nullify her inherited Holocaust guilt within the framework established by those who want to put her down like a dog. The proper answer is not "I am not my father", it is "I don't care about you".

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    Senior Member Anfang's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hauke Haien View Post
    Hertwig's problem is that she tries to nullify her inherited Holocaust guilt within the framework established by those who want to put her down like a dog. The proper answer is not "I am not my father", it is "I don't care about you".
    This guilt garbage has got to stop! The Spanish exterminated millions of Indians and so did the English. The descendants of the spanish and the English strut around their conquered territory today EVERY DAY looking in the faces of the indians and saying: "we comquered you, and you can do nothing."

    Today in 2008 the Mexicans when they do not understand you and want to say " I do not understand, what did you say?" ask "Mande?" which means "give me an order".

    History is as the saying goes written by the winner.


    The spanish fed the indians to their dogs:
    http://americanindiansource.com/columbusday.html


    more feeding Indians to dogs.. Yes they were dogfood!
    http://www.heyokamagazine.com/HEYOKA...dHolocaust.htm

    King of Spain to Chavez, the remix:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5cZFi...eature=related


    The king says to the Indian representative of his people, "Why don.t you just shut up"

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    Fathers guilt

    And so what, my grandfather was also a proud and loyal member of 7 SS Gebirgs division Prinz Eugen and i know, becourse he told me, he comited some acts that he was not proud of but on the other hand they hade to be dane, so i woudnt colle that guilt but proud to be comited to a greather cose and so woud be i !!!

    There were some thing that we ( the next and third generation ) coud not understand but belive me they know what they were doing and thouse things no matter how hard they were, hade to be dane, for the greather cose, for us, the future germanic generation!!!

    My grandfather once told me, "you will see, there will come the time that you guys will know that we were wright but unfortunatly we coudnt finishe the yob"! I didnt understand him what he meant with this words at that time, now i now, belive me i do and i truly hope that others understand that to!

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