Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Was the inner Richard Wagner a Christian?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    georgepohl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Last Online
    Wednesday, May 12th, 2010 @ 01:19 PM
    Ethnicity
    German & Anglo-Saxon
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    New York New York
    Location
    Central NY State
    Gender
    Family
    Divorced, not looking
    Occupation
    Retired
    Politics
    Conservative
    Religion
    Congregationalist
    Posts
    19
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts

    Question Was the inner Richard Wagner a Christian?

    WAS THE INNER WAGNER A CHRISTIAN?

    .....Richard Wagner lived in an era when a talented, poor commoner was forced to find a wealthy patron . It was necessary to seek employment with the kings and other princes of the establishment. Germany's status quo of that age rested on artificial divisions which had resulted in the formation of five kingdoms; Prussia in 1701, Saxony in 1806, Bavaria in 1805, Hanover in 1814, and Wurttemburg in 1805. Additionally, there were ten principalities, six grand-duchies, and eleven duchies. Each of these territories had a Christian ruler.
    .....Only with patronage did Wagner manage to survive and allow his genius to flourish. As a proponent of German nationalism and unity, he realized that Germany would never regain its greatness while it was divided. As a young man in 1849, he risked his life when he went to the barricades after joining in a failed attempt to have the Kingdom of Saxony dissolved.
    .....The monumental Ring Cycle was written over the span from 1852 (libretto of the Ring) to 1874 (completion of Gotterdammerung). During this time, necessity forced him to seek the patronage of rich rulers and, in one case, a rich merchant (von Wesendonck). The perfect patron, King Ludwig II of Bavaria, suddenly contacted Wagner in 1864. Ludwig paid off all of Wagner's debts, and supplied financial support until Wagner died in 1883. Ludwig shared Wagners's love of the ancient greatness of Germanic peoples. Ludwig's patronage allowed completion of the Ring Cycle, and the building of the Festspielhaus at Bayreuth.
    .....Before and during the creation of the Ring Cycle, Wagner studied the eddas and sagas for background and inspiration. This pre-Christian influence must have infused him with love for the mystery and glory of Teutonic origins. Siegfried and Brunnhilde represented the youthful hope of the Germanic peoples. But, of course, it all came to naught; Gotterdammerung signified the ascendancy of Christianity.
    .....Was Wagner a Christian at heart? Not likely.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Brunnhilda - helmet.jpg 
Views:	71 
Size:	3.4 KB 
ID:	101003   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Siegfried - armed.jpg 
Views:	78 
Size:	305.7 KB 
ID:	101004  

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Psychonaut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Last Online
    Wednesday, May 18th, 2016 @ 01:34 AM
    Ethnicity
    Acadian
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    Pennsylvania Pennsylvania
    Gender
    Age
    37
    Politics
    Old Stock Nativism
    Religion
    Heathen Theosophy
    Posts
    927
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    15
    Thanked in
    15 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by georgepohl View Post
    Was Wagner a Christian at heart? Not likely.
    Are you familiar with his final opera, Parsifal? It is a work so Christian that it dissolved the long held friendship between Wagner and Nietzsche.
    "Ocean is more ancient than the mountains, and freighted with the memories and the dreams of Time."
    -H.P. Lovecraft

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Matthieu Borg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Last Online
    Thursday, August 16th, 2012 @ 09:36 PM
    Ethnicity
    Scandinavian
    Country
    Canada Canada
    Gender
    Age
    38
    Posts
    79
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1
    Thanked in
    1 Post
    Indeed, Parsifal may be called Richard Wagner's great confession of faith. He takes the legend of the Holy Grail, and uses it to portray wonderfully and thrillingly the Christian truths of the beauty, the glory, and the inspiring power of the Lord's Supper, and the infinite meaning of the redeeming love of the Cross. He reveals in this drama by poetry and music, and with a marvellous breadth and depth of spiritual conception, this theme (in his own words): "The founder of the Christian religion was not wise: He was divine. To believe in Him is to imitate Him and to seek union with Him.... In consequence of His atoning death, everything which lives and breathes may know itself redeemed.... Only love rooted in sympathy and expressed in action to the point of a complete destruction of self-will, is Christian love." (Wagner's Letters, 1880, pages 270, 365, 339.)

Similar Threads

  1. The Great Richard Wagner (1813-1883)
    By Johannes de León in forum Music & Hymns
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: Sunday, August 22nd, 2010, 07:02 AM
  2. Richard Wagner: Der Ring des Nibelugen
    By Sigurd Volsung in forum Music & Hymns
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Sunday, December 17th, 2006, 11:18 AM
  3. Classify Richard Wagner
    By kurwenal in forum Anthropological Taxonomy
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: Wednesday, January 4th, 2006, 09:45 AM
  4. Tannhäuser Overture by Richard Wagner
    By Zyklop in forum Music & Hymns
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: Monday, August 8th, 2005, 08:08 PM
  5. Judaism in Music [Richard Wagner]
    By Ahnenerbe in forum Music & Hymns
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Monday, March 14th, 2005, 07:23 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •