Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Creating a Herb Garden

  1. #1
    Funding Member
    „Friend of Germanics”
    Funding Membership Inactive
    Blutwölfin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Last Online
    Friday, June 5th, 2020 @ 10:35 PM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    German
    Ancestry
    Skåne and North Frisia
    Country
    Iceland Iceland
    Gender
    Family
    In a steady relationship
    Posts
    4,113
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    18
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    146
    Thanked in
    94 Posts

    Creating a Herb Garden

    A lot of interesting facts and remedies.

    - Herbs from A - Z
    - Foods That Heal
    - Teas, Salves and Oils

    Iduns Herb Garden
    Lík börn leika best.

  2. #2

    Creating a Herb Garden

    Why not create your own herb garden. And carry on a tradition that has been passed on from generation to generation since the dawn of time? Herbs are some of the easiest plants to grow, and if you are a novice to gardening, they teach you a lot.

    More on
    Doctor Greenfinger's site


    Herbal recipes, information on medicinal herbs, and herbal crafts.
    Annette's Herb Garden


    Herbs flourish under the same conditions that you provide for your flower or vegetable garden. Although most herbs will grow in partial shade, it is better if the herb garden receives at least 4 to 6 hours of sunlight a day. A majority of herbs will grow well under a wide range of soil conditions, with the exception of extremely wet, poorly drained soils. Note, however, that sage, rosemary, and thyme require a well-drained but moderately moist soil. If the garden soil is poorly drained, you can improve the situation by modifying or amending it. Even more effective would be the use of raised beds. To improve soil fertility and tilth, add several bushels of compost per 100 square feet of soil before planting. Spade it into the soil thoroughly. In general, herbs do better in soils of low to medium fertility, so additional fertilizer applications are not needed. Soils with high fertility tend to produce lots of foliage that is low in flavor. Excerpt from: Growing Herbs in the Home Garden by James C.Schmidt at Department of Horticulture
    __________________

  3. #3
    Funding Member
    „Friend of Germanics”
    Funding Membership Inactive
    Gefjon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Gender
    Age
    40
    Family
    Married parent
    Posts
    1,435
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    121
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    338
    Thanked in
    190 Posts

    Thumbs Up Herb Garden

    If you are new to gardening, growing a herb garden is a great way to start. Herbs are generally easy to grow, useful for culinary and medicinal purposes, and look attractive as well. Most herbs can be grown from seed, sown in late spring. Few insects and diseases attack herbs - one reason they are so good for beginners.

    Good drainage is vital for growing herbs. They won't grow in very wet soil. You will need to pick a sunny spot, which is sheltered from wind. Most herbs like Mediterranean conditions. If the soil is too clay, then you have to take steps to make it less heavy. You should prepare it well in advance of planting. One way is to dig over the soil in autumn, leaving clods to be broken down by frost over the winter, if you have that sort of climate. In early spring, dig plenty of compost into the soil. (This is also necessary with chalky, silty or sandy soil). The herbs should now grow well, with no further need of fertilization which, while increasing foliage, decreases flavor. The herbs can be protected during the winter months by mulch - straw, leaves, evergreen branches - which you can keep there until the herbs start growing again the following spring.



    Grow whatever you like, having taken into account the size that the plant will grow to. Some herbs, like mint, spread fast and can take over the garden. The word for such plants is "invasive". So bear that in mind. Normally, for aesthetic reasons and to make them easier to pick, you would want the taller herbs at the back and lower ones in front. There are very many varieties of each herb, with varying fragrances and colors. You can choose an appealing selection with shades such as purple, pink, silver and just green.

    Examples of herbs commonly grown are: mint; parsley; dill; thyme; marjoram; oregano; sage and chives. Each has medicinal properties as well as making food taste special. I'm concentrating on some of their medicinal purposes in the following:

    All herbs contain plenty of vitamins and minerals. Mint is good for your digestion. Parsley is a good breath freshener. Dill (which is wonderful with potatoes and fish) grows rather tall and has traditionally been used as a preventative of constipation, while also being a cure for diarrhea. Thyme has a sedative effect, and is a good antispasmodic and expectorant, useful for coughs of various kinds. Marjoram, make into an ointment, is good for healing sores. Boiled in water and drunk, it cures toothache, cramps and convulsions. Oregano was much favored by the Aztecs. It is similar in effects to marjoram, but more potent. Not suitable for children and pregnant women. Sage, boiled in water, strengthens gums and helps keep teeth clean and white. Chives have high vitamins A and C and are antibiotic and antiseptic.

    If you are short of garden space, herbs can easily be grown in containers outside, or hanging baskets or indoors. If growing herbs indoors, try to keep temperature fluctuation to a minimum, and avoid fumes from cooking. Kitchens can be an awkward location in this respect. Not all herbs grow so well indoors, but at least you can harvest them in the winter, unlike those outside. Basil is one that is difficult, while mint, parsley and rosemary don't mind lower light levels. Grow them by a sunny window (preferably southern exposure) but shelter from the most direct and hottest rays of sun. Some people use artificial lighting, but this is a use of electricity that is best avoided out of concern for adding to climate change.

    Drainage is important just as with the herbs outdoors. A recommendation would be: in equal parts, potting soil, sand and humus. Water very lightly in the morning. Over-watering causes root rot fungus. Once a fortnight, in spring and summer you can use a small amount of weak (half normal strength) fertilizer. In the winter, once a month is sufficient. Allow some healthy air circulation, as herbs don't like stuffy houses any more than humans do.

    Growing herbs is fun, inexpensive and livens up bland cooking.

    Link

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Angharad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Last Online
    Friday, July 13th, 2018 @ 09:31 PM
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    California California
    Gender
    Family
    In a steady relationship
    Posts
    136
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    8
    Thanked in
    8 Posts
    I've tried having a herb garden, but the snails won't seem to let me. I especially can't grow basil, if I bring a plant home it is gone overnight. Seeds don't work either. So far only scented geraniums have lasted, and they aren't so good to eat.



    Anyone know any herbs that snails don't like?

  5. #5
    Funding Member
    „Friend of Germanics”
    Funding Membership Inactive
    Gefjon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Gender
    Age
    40
    Family
    Married parent
    Posts
    1,435
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    121
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    338
    Thanked in
    190 Posts

    Thumbs Down Growing Mint

    Growing Mint

    Mint is a plant with leaves that has got a fresh, aromatic taste and scent, combined with a more cool aftertaste. It is used for many things like candy, toothpaste, tea and adding flavour to your food.

    Mint is fairly easy to grow, but there is one slight problem: it spreads like a plague. To avoid that, the first thing you need is a piece of soil where the mint can roam freely without swallowing up space for your other plants. Mint can grow in a lot of environments, but the best place is in a slightly moist piece of soil, partially in the shade.



    To grow mint at home, find an appropriate space where it can grow and dig a hole large enough for your mint plant and its roots. If you have multiple plants (which I advise having), make sure the holes are approx. 20 cm away from eachother. That way you'll make sure they each have enough space to grow.

    Next, you'll need the mint plants. If you don't have these already, you can get them from a nursery or your local gardening centre. You could also use seeds, which would have to be soaked first, but because the success rate with seeds vary a lot and their growth might be hard to control, I recommend using plants instead (that have already gone through the first phase of growing).

    Now that you have everything ready, it's time to plant the mint. If you want to make them less 'agressive' growing, place them inside some bottomless containers. You can use a lot of things for that, but a stone/clay pipe probably works best. This doesn't prevent them from overgrowing though, it just slows the process down. Eventually, the mints' roots will 'crawl' over the top of the containers. If you see this happening, cut them off.

    Mint will grow in almost any season as long as it doesn't freeze, so you might be able to even plant them right now. After you've planted them, you don't have to do very much. Give the plants some water every once or second day and make sure they don't spread elsewhere in your garden.



    It takes approximately 3 months for mint to grow from seed to plant (if you're using seeds). If you bought them as plants, you could harvest from them any moment you like. To harvest them, pluck off the leaves or cut off the whole plant, it all depends on what you prefer.

    In case you want to enjoy mint in colder seasons like late autumn and winter, see my article about drying herbs here. This way works the best if you've cut off the whole plant. If you just plucked the leaves, the best idea would be to simply place them on a plate and leave them in the sun for a while, or place the plate in the oven for a couple of minutes.

    Click

  6. #6
    Funding Member
    „Friend of Germanics”
    Funding Membership Inactive
    Blood_Axis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Last Online
    Thursday, July 8th, 2021 @ 07:56 AM
    Ethnicity
    Hellenic
    Ancestry
    75% Hellenic. 25% Anglosaxon
    Subrace
    Noric
    Country
    Other Other
    Gender
    Age
    43
    Family
    In a steady relationship
    Religion
    Still searching
    Posts
    5,150
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    31
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    81
    Thanked in
    43 Posts
    To avoid the 'spreading like a plague' effect, you can just keep it pot-bound
    Put it among your flower pots or simply at your kitchen window, on its own or along with other herbs, it gives fragrance and it is also a natural insect-repelling plant...

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Phlegethon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Last Online
    Monday, April 4th, 2016 @ 11:13 PM
    Gender
    Age
    50
    Posts
    2,820
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    30
    Thanked in
    30 Posts
    Too bad most folks here don't have a garden.
    And all my youth passed by sad-hearted,
    the joy of Spring was never mine;
    Autumn blows through me dread of parting,
    and my heart dreams and longs to die.

    - Nikolaus Lenau (1802-1850)

    Real misanthropes are not found in solitude, but in the world; since it is experience of life, and not philosophy, which produces real hatred of mankind.

    - Giacomo Leopardi (1798-1837)

  8. #8
    Funding Member
    „Friend of Germanics”
    Funding Membership Inactive
    Gefjon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Ethnicity
    Anglo-American
    Gender
    Age
    40
    Family
    Married parent
    Posts
    1,435
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    121
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    338
    Thanked in
    190 Posts
    That's a sad thing innit? Alternatively folks could do indoor, container gardening? A little green inside their apartments could lighten up the atmosphere and provide some oxygen.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Phlegethon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Last Online
    Monday, April 4th, 2016 @ 11:13 PM
    Gender
    Age
    50
    Posts
    2,820
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    30
    Thanked in
    30 Posts
    No space for that in my kennel.
    And all my youth passed by sad-hearted,
    the joy of Spring was never mine;
    Autumn blows through me dread of parting,
    and my heart dreams and longs to die.

    - Nikolaus Lenau (1802-1850)

    Real misanthropes are not found in solitude, but in the world; since it is experience of life, and not philosophy, which produces real hatred of mankind.

    - Giacomo Leopardi (1798-1837)

  10. #10
    Member
    Solwynn_AOR's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Last Online
    Friday, May 15th, 2009 @ 10:57 PM
    Ethnicity
    Celto-Germanic
    Ancestry
    Brittany, Scotland, Norway
    Country
    Canada Canada
    State
    Manitoba Manitoba
    Gender
    Age
    49
    Family
    In a steady relationship
    Occupation
    Trade school instructor
    Politics
    Conservative
    Religion
    Odinist
    Posts
    19
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    0
    Thanked in
    0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Angharad View Post
    I've tried having a herb garden, but the snails won't seem to let me. I especially can't grow basil, if I bring a plant home it is gone overnight. Seeds don't work either. So far only scented geraniums have lasted, and they aren't so good to eat.



    Anyone know any herbs that snails don't like?
    Have you tried putting beer in a little tuna tin and leaving that in your garden? Submerge it into the soil, and then fill it with beer. The snails follow the smell of the beer, fall in, and die happy. I know some gardeners who do this with great success but you have to monitor the beer levels in the tins.

    .....and you have to be willing to part with beer.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Creating a Fertile Soil for Your Garden
    By Hersir in forum Self-Reliance, Off Grid, & Gardening
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Tuesday, June 28th, 2011, 10:22 AM
  2. EU Declares Peppermint a Controllable Herb
    By Víðálfr in forum Health, Fitness & Nutrition
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: Thursday, December 9th, 2010, 09:05 PM
  3. Heathen Herb Lore
    By Blutwölfin in forum Folk Art & Culture
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Wednesday, November 2nd, 2005, 01:23 PM
  4. Herb Blends: Fines Herbes
    By WarMaiden in forum Food & Drink
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Tuesday, April 13th, 2004, 04:12 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •