Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: 'Hytte' Life in Norway

  1. #1
    Senior Administrator
    „Friend of Germanics”
    Skadi Funding Member
    Aeternitas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Last Online
    @
    Ethnicity
    German
    Gender
    Family
    Married
    Politics
    Libertarian
    Religion
    Christian
    Posts
    1,561
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    58
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    502
    Thanked in
    163 Posts

    'Hytte' Life in Norway

    Why Norwegians love spending time in their cabins

    A hytte is a cabin and these are little places Norwegians hike to or use as a base to hike from, weekends and holidays.

    A hytte is usually made of wood, is often painted grey or red and is always located in the middle of nowhere (i.e. most of Norway). The nearest shop is usually at least an hour away.

    Hytter are always top places in the Norwegian soul for feeling very koselig (‘cosy’) and hyggelig. Certain things characterise most Norwegian hytter: Inside, the walls are wood panelling, the furniture is wood, the floor is wooden and any utensils that can be are made from wood, giving it the feeling of, well, nature.

    A traditional hytte will most likely have old copper pans on the walls, some skis, and maybe some stuffed animals.

    Whatever you eat at the hytte, you can be guaranteed it will be served on mismatched crockery – all the stuff someone’s mum didn’t feel quite worked at home.

    Hytter are usually small places, ranging from pretty up to date to rather basic – this largely depends on where your hytte is located. You may be in a very remote area, so chances are you won’t have access to certain facilities. Some lack running water (this comes from the nearby fjord, well or stream, even if you have to hack through the ice to get to it), some only lack hot water.

    Some have only wood fires and take approximately 16 hours to warm up when you arrive (then it’s like a sauna for the rest of your stay).

    The toilet is known as utedo and is sometimes located outside. It has no lights and, when you’re done, you need to add woodchips to your business to ensure you leave it fresh. Of course, some newer hytter have toilets and heating and all things modern. Peeing outdoors is a natural part of hytte life and you soon get used to it. At one, with nature…
    More here.

  2. #2
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    Sunday, January 4th, 2009 @ 04:32 AM
    Ethnicity
    Norwegian
    Ancestry
    Scandinavia
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Country
    Norway Norway
    State
    Hedmark Hedmark
    Location
    Hamar
    Gender
    Age
    30
    Family
    Having a longtime compani
    Occupation
    I'm a parasite, I sell stuff.
    Politics
    Man marks the Earth with ruin.
    Religion
    Nature shall prevail!
    Posts
    1,950
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    2
    Thanked in
    2 Posts
    Yeah, some Norwegians still enjoy our beautiful nature. While most Norwegians, nowadays, buy cabins which are E-X-P-E-N-S-I-V-E!! (Atleast in my head )
    It's all about doing what is popular, especially to the rich and wealthy ones, now, it is popular to have your own (huge) cabin.

    I don't have any cabin, still, I spend more time in the woodlands and mountains than most of the shallow, rich people with expensive cabins

  3. #3
    Funding Member
    „Friend of Germanics”
    Funding Membership Inactive
    Pørdy Mountain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Last Online
    Saturday, September 12th, 2009 @ 10:20 PM
    Ethnicity
    Norwegian
    Country
    Norway Norway
    State
    South Trondelag South Trondelag
    Location
    Currently in Vestfold
    Gender
    Age
    35
    Occupation
    Student, works in Airport Retail
    Politics
    Man marks the Earth with ruin.
    Religion
    Agnostic
    Posts
    422
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1
    Thanked in
    1 Post
    Not to mention the celebrities who are now building these new fancy, huge cabins right next to eachother.. Worst part is that they live there for say, two weekends each year. What a waste. On top of that they get in fights with the locals about how high their fences can be. Who needs a fence in the forrest anyway? If you are building a fortress, yes, but a cabin? No way.
    "I don't trust or love anyone. Because people are so creepy. Creepy creepy creeps. Creeping around. Creeping here and creeping there. Creeping everywhere. Crippity crappity creepies."
    -Vincent Gallo.

  4. #4
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Last Online
    Friday, April 3rd, 2009 @ 09:10 PM
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Norwegian
    Ancestry
    Maternal: Norway, Paternal: Massachusetts
    Subrace
    I don't know Lundman's taxonomy.
    Country
    United States United States
    State
    Connecticut Connecticut
    Location
    South Glastonbury, Connecticut
    Gender
    Age
    89
    Family
    Single, not looking
    Occupation
    Nothing (retired)
    Politics
    monarchist
    Religion
    agnostic
    Posts
    1,701
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    20
    Thanked in
    20 Posts

    Hytter

    Are the saeteren still being used as summer pastures, or has this practise been abandoned ? If it has, are the sod-roofed saeter huts being used as hytter now ?

  5. #5
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    Sunday, January 4th, 2009 @ 04:32 AM
    Ethnicity
    Norwegian
    Ancestry
    Scandinavia
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Country
    Norway Norway
    State
    Hedmark Hedmark
    Location
    Hamar
    Gender
    Age
    30
    Family
    Having a longtime compani
    Occupation
    I'm a parasite, I sell stuff.
    Politics
    Man marks the Earth with ruin.
    Religion
    Nature shall prevail!
    Posts
    1,950
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    2
    Thanked in
    2 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Egil Skallagrimsson
    Are the saeteren still being used as summer pastures, or has this practise been abandoned ? If it has, are the sod-roofed saeter huts being used as hytter now ?
    Sæteren were originally used as farming etc, and nowadays, it is more or less a tourist-attraction

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Ausswolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    Wednesday, July 9th, 2008 @ 08:19 AM
    Gender
    Age
    36
    Posts
    97
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    3
    Thanked in
    3 Posts
    Started reading Boy by Roald Dahl the other night at my girlfriends (yes its a kids book but it was 4am and i was bored ) in it he talks about his summer holidays in Norway, very idyllic, he used to stay at one of these little old primitive holiday cabins and they would spend all their time boating, fishing etc.

    As a side note turns out he was actually of Norwegian blood, 6'6 tall, anti-semitic and had a sort of 'viking funeral'. And yes I was a huge fan when I was a little kid haha.

  7. #7
    Germania incognita
    „Friend of Germanics”
    Skadi Funding Member
    Hersir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Status
    Available
    Ethnicity
    Norwegian
    Ancestry
    Norway
    Subrace
    Nordid
    Y-DNA
    I2b1
    mtDNA
    J2a1a1b
    Country
    Norway Norway
    State
    South Trondelag South Trondelag
    Location
    Norway
    Gender
    Age
    33
    Zodiac Sign
    Pisces
    Family
    Single adult
    Politics
    Nationalist
    Posts
    6,137
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    1,209
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    890
    Thanked in
    407 Posts
    Seems like many Norwegians have the wrong motives when building big cabins with alot of TV's, bubblebaths and whatnot. Seems more like another house than a cabin. The old farm my family use as a "hytte" is very simplistic, dosnt have shower, hot water or a water closet. I like the way I get away from the city and technology, cant describe how relaxing it is. Completly quiet, no noise at all, fresh air, few people and beatiful nature. We own some land and I like to go in the woods and chop wood.

  8. #8
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    Thursday, December 10th, 2009 @ 07:34 AM
    Age
    45
    Posts
    597
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    0
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    13
    Thanked in
    13 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Alfadir
    Seems like many Norwegians have the wrong motives when building big cabins with alot of TV's, bubblebaths and whatnot.
    When I used to go camping with my father sometimes other people would drive up in huge campers with a satellite dish on top so they can watch cable. What's the point of getting out to nature if you're going to drag all that shit along with you?

  9. #9
    Funding Member
    „Friend of Germanics”
    Funding Membership Inactive
    Nachtengel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Last Online
    @
    Ethnicity
    German
    Gender
    Posts
    6,311
    Thanks Thanks Given 
    175
    Thanks Thanks Received 
    1,074
    Thanked in
    613 Posts
    Norwegians are spending more than ever before on second homes in the mountains. The market is booming especially at altitude and in close proximity to resorts.

    Owners of mountain cabins (hytter) are gearing up for the next few weekends. The weekends around Norway's “winter holiday” are prime time for cabin viewings and sales.

    Cabin prices rise again

    According to an Eiendom Norge report, prices in 2019 rose an average of 2.9% over the previous year. That presents the fifth consecutive year of inflation, after several years decline following the financial crisis. The report puts the average mountain cabin price at 2 million Norwegian kroner, but there are substantial variations.

    The proximity to ski resorts is a major factor in the sale price. But another factor is the elevation. Cabins located above 800 metres above sea level fetch substantially more money.

    It's not just prices that are rising. Interest in cabins among affluent Norwegians is also on the up. From February 2019 to January 2020, 3,899 mountain cabins were sold in Norway. That's an increase of 2.4% on the previous period.

    The most expensive cabin locations

    Many people dream of owning a hytte near one of Norway's best ski resorts. But that's exactly where the prices are highest. The municipalities of Trysil, Ringsaker (Sjusjøen), and Krødsherad and Sigdal (Norefjell and Haglebu) top the revenue statistics for cabin sales. The highest median prices can be found in Øyer (Hafjell), Hol (Geilo, Uastaoset and Haugstøl) and Flå.

    “The strong price trend in the market for mountain cabins continues for the fifth year in a row. But price growth is slowing compared to the last four years,” says Eiendom Norge CEO Henning Lauridsen.

    “For the 2019/20 season, a new record has been set in the number of sales. We currently do not see any signs that the interest in buying a cabin will be dampened. Many households are planning to realize the hytte dream and are doing so, as our numbers show.”

    Cabins are popular year-round

    Nettavisen reports that more than 2,500 hytter are listed on the property marketplace of Finn.no. Of these, 60 are new listings ahead of the busiest time of year for sales. They also carry an interview with a real estate agent in Oppdal, a popular destination for Norwegian skiers.

    “When I started, there were mostly winter tourists here. But now we see that the cabins are used all year round. In fact, I have the impression that there are now more tourists here in the summer,” says Knudsen, who works for Eiendomsmegler 1 in Oppdal.

    What does money buy you in Norway?

    As you can see from the numbers above, it's impossible to generalise when it comes to property prices. So, let's take a look at some of the cabins available right now on Finn.no.

    First, Trysil, one of the most popular weekend destinations for the Oslo ski set. This three bedroom penthouse apartment, pictured above, is located high on the mountain with a fantastic view of Fageråsen and the ski resort from its 3 terraces. You can easily ski down to the ski resort, and you're also close to the cross-country trails. The asking price is 4.5 million kroner.

    Farther away from Trysil but still within reach of Oslo, this family-friendly cabin is in a small community of similar properties known as Furutangen. The inviting cabin has an open plan living room, bathroom with sauna, several bedrooms, and a loft with its own TV room. The asking price is 2,590,000 kroner.

    I mentioned above the average asking price for cabins across the country is around the two million kroner mark. Now let's take a look at the type of property available under that amount. This cabin was built in 2009 and has a modern interior, with electricity, water and drainage established.

    The reason the asking price is just 1.6 million kroner? The location. While the property offers great views of the countryside between Flekkefjord and Lyngdal is not prime skiing country. However, the southern Norway summers make this a terrific year-round cabin choice.
    https://www.lifeinnorway.net/mountai...property-boom/

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 18
    Last Post: Thursday, June 2nd, 2011, 02:14 PM
  2. Norway Has Best Quality of Life: UN Report
    By Hersir in forum Norway
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Friday, November 12th, 2010, 03:37 AM
  3. Replies: 8
    Last Post: Monday, May 3rd, 2010, 08:44 PM
  4. Replies: 11
    Last Post: Sunday, April 19th, 2009, 12:56 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •