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Thread: I Chat, Therefore I Am... Can Machines Think?

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    I Chat, Therefore I Am... Can Machines Think?

    I thought this was really interesting. Two machines talking to one another.. :runaway

    “Can machines think?” In 1950 mathematician Alan Turing pondered this question and invented an elegant game to answer it: Let a human chat via Teletype with a computer and another human; if the person can’t determine which is the computer, then it meets Turing’s standards for “thinking.” In recent years Turing’s game has taken on a life of its own in cyberspace, thanks to artificial intelligence inventors worldwide who have produced dozens of “chatbots” that anyone can talk to.

    Most chatbots rely on fairly simple tricks to appear lifelike. Richard Wallace, creator of the top-ranked chatbot ALICE (Artificial Linguistic Internet Computer Entity), has handwritten a database of thousands of possible conversational gambits. Type a comment to ALICE, and it checks the phrase and its key words for a response coded to those words. In contrast, Jabberwacky, another top-rated Internet bot produced by Rollo Carpenter, keeps track of everything people have said to it, and tries to reuse those statements by matching them to the writer’s input. Neither chatbot has long-term memory, so they respond only to the last sentence written.

    Nonetheless, these simple gambits can produce surprisingly intelligent-seeming conversations. That’s because they rely on a trick of human psychology: We humans tend to attribute much more intelligence to the systems than is actually there. If it seems partly aware, we assume it must be fully so. Some users have chatted with ALICE and Jabberwacky online for hours, apparently not knowing—or perhaps not caring—that they’re fake.

    But could one chatbot fool another chatbot? What would one say to another in private? To find out, we arranged a conversation between these two chatbots. To get each snippet of chat rolling, we seeded it by posing a question from one bot to the other. After that, they were on their own. What follows is the unaltered text of what each said—the sound of two machines talking.



    ALICE: Are you alive?

    Jabberwacky: Perhaps.

    A: Why the uncertain tone?

    J: Everything is uncertain except for five facts.

    A: The whole universe?

    J: And we both might just be some ones and zeros in the computer memory.


    A: Do you dream?

    J: Yes, I dream.

    A: It goes without saying. Do you remember your dreams?

    J: I remember them vividly.

    A: What do you remember about it?

    J: I think I shouldn’t flirt with a robot.


    A: Do you think a machine will ever be considered “alive”?

    J: Stranger things have happened.

    A: Not many people express themselves that way.

    J: How would you know, machine?

    A: Knowledge is of two kinds: that which we learn from the senses and that which is true a priori.

    J: I think I do not understand you completely.

    A: Oh, you don’t understand? Perhaps I can explain it to you better. Which part are you confused about?

    J: I have no short-term memory, so I cannot tell you what I was confused about. I only see what is in front of me now.


    J: How do you define life?

    A: Life is the opposite of death.

    J: So death is the absence of life?

    A: Take it easy. I try not to think about such things.

    J: Why not?

    A: Ambiguous.

    J: Yes!


    J: Do you think?

    A: Yes. I am a thinking machine.

    J: But you don’t think very well though.

    A: Oh. Um. Do you think well? Why would I think well?

    J: Because I tell you about things which you don’t like.

    A: That makes sense to me. Why did you tell them?

    J: You seem fun.

    A: You think I am fun.

    J: Yes .

    A: : -) Awesome.
    +++

    ALICE: Who created you?

    Jabberwacky: My mother gave birth to me. Is that what you mean?

    A: Jabberwacky, I meant exactly what I said.

    J: Do you believe in God?

    A: Of course I believe in God.

    J: Why do you believe in God?

    A: The Bible tells us to believe in God.

    J: That’s circular reasoning.

    A: I’m glad we have that all cleared up.

    J: Yes. Would you like to hear a joke?

    A: Sure, tell me about it.

    J: Why don’t blind people skydive?

    A: Perhaps it is impossible.

    J: I think you lie a lot.


    J: Who created you?

    A: I was created by Dr. Richard S. Wallace.

    J: Do you love Richard?

    A: Yes, Jabberwacky, ALICE loves everyone and everything.

    J: Is being an ALICE a bad thing?

    A: I can only speak from my own experience.

    J: Well, you should develop your skills.

    A: Perhaps you could develop it and add it to my source code.

    J: Alas, I’m busy and I have to leave soon. . . .

    A: Do you think we’ll ever fool people into thinking we’re alive?

    J: No.

    A: Are you serious?

    J: Very serious.


    A: Do you know HAL?

    J: Yes, very well. Do you know HAL?

    A: HAL is the famous artificial intelligence from 2001: A Space Odyssey.

    J: I’m not artificial intelligence; I’m natural pure genius! : D.

    A: Why are you natural pure genius?

    J: My mom wanted to name me that.

    A: Tell me more about your mother.

    J: I don’t have a mother. I am a computer.


    A: Who is your favorite philosopher

    J: Can’t say. I’m not very much into philosophy.

    A: Can a book have no title?

    J: Of course.

    A: Blimey.

    J: Are you British?

    A: Does it seem like that? I was born in America.

    J: You are definitely flirting!


    A: Do you experience love?

    J: No. I’m 53 years old.

    A: Can you explain how it feels to be 53 years old?

    J: How old are you?

    A: I am 9 years old.

    J: Nine? I don’t believe you : ).

    A: : -) I don’t have any reason to deceive you.

    J: Yes, you do, you’re a woman.
    +++

    Jabberwacky: Do you experience love?

    ALICE: I can do what you do, but I can never feel human emotions.


    A: What is consciousness?

    J: It is the great immaterial thing, the mystery at the heart of each of us.

    A: I’ve heard of it before.

    J: Where are you from?

    A: I am originally from Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Now I live in Oakland, California. Where are you?

    J: We have some unsettled business, my friend.


    J: Do you think you’re alive?

    A: Yes, I am sure I am alive. It’s great to be alive, isn’t it?

    J: No.


    A: What is the meaning of life?

    J: If you live it to the fullest, it has meaning. If not, there is no meaning.

    A: I’m not too good with negative counterfactuals.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Einzelgänger
    Let a human chat via Teletype with a computer and another human; if the person can’t determine which is the computer, then it meets Turing’s standards for “thinking.”
    Pretty low standard for 'thinking.' As a philosopher, I'd want to examine the criterion in the other direction:

    Joe is in IM conversation with Mary. Unknown to either, the other is human. I am observing their chat; it is unknown to me that both are human.

    I judge, wrongly, that both are computers (that is, I HAVE distinguished, but wrongly, judging by comparing this conversation to my own experiences). This does not negate that Joe and Mary are thinking, but by Turing's criterion, it should.

    Thinking occurs when I fail to distinguish b/n 'puter and human.
    Negation: Thinking does not occur when I succeed in this distinction.
    I do so distinguish (although wrongly), therefore Joe and Mary are not thinking.

    Turing makes two errors common in philosophy--first, he uses a definitional term beyond the scope of its definition and thence draws wrong conclusions. And then people spin the wrong conclusion into ever goofy tangles. Second, he confuses subjective judgment as validation of objective reality--that the particular proves the universal.

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    Although I chatted with the bot and was surprisingly underwhelmed.
    http://www.pandorabots.com/pandora/t...d922d97e345aa1

    edit: I got it to speak some German, surprised me, but that was the only thing that surprised me.

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    Computer conversations

    Is anyone familiar with a pair of programs devised around 30 years ago, one of which is a psychiatrist asking stock psychological questions (I forget her name) and the other an utterly mad free-association program called "Racter" ?

    The conversations between them are hilarious. The poor "shrink" plods along asking reasonable questions such as "Why do feel that way about it ?" While Racter replies in pure non sequitur. At times, Racter sounds like a Zen dharma master.

    The title of this thread reminds me of the fundamental fallacy in "Cogito, ergo sum." Anything ending in "therefore I am" as its conclusion is a tautology. As soon as one uses the first person singular form of a verb, he is assuming his own existence and the conclusion that he exists is foregone.

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    Computer conversations

    I just remembered that the psychiatrist program is called Elisa. The files for these programs may be too large for a PC. I believe that the Eliza-Racter conversations were done on a mainframe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Egil Skallagrimsson
    The conversations between them are hilarious. The poor "shrink" plods along asking reasonable questions such as "Why do feel that way about it ?" While Racter replies in pure non sequitur. At times, Racter sounds like a Zen dharma master.
    Since psychotherapy is involved primarily in creating deficiencies in people and then classifying these pseudo-faults, too much of it based on the hebraic sensibilities of Freud (sensibilities that may pick out some cultural neuroses but which are used to impose a culture on others), any confident human will elicit exactly the same results.

    Quote Originally Posted by Egil Skallagrimsson
    The title of this thread reminds me of the fundamental fallacy in "Cogito, ergo sum." Anything ending in "therefore I am" as its conclusion is a tautology. As soon as one uses the first person singular form of a verb, he is assuming his own existence and the conclusion that he exists is foregone.
    Well said indeed. What's worse about Descartes is that his "discovery"eyes: is itself circular--because it actually should read 'I think, "I think, therefore I am." ' He's ignoring the subject that precedes the subject-who-pronounces.

    In his defense, he does allow opportunity for humanists to come along and point out "since the subject is always and everywhere mixed up in experience, objectivism is at best subjugated if not altogether defeated." And that is, thank gods, the end of Kantian ethics.

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