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Thread: Stonehenge Built Using Giant Wicker Baskets. Research Funded by Pier 1

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    Stonehenge Built Using Giant Wicker Baskets. Research Funded by Pier 1

    Rolling a 4-ton stone some 200 miles from a Welsh quarry to the site that the world now knows as Stonehenge would have been a daunting enough challenge for even the hardiest of Neolithic-era laborers. There have been any number of explanations offered - the most recent coming last week when a University of Exeter archeology student suggested that wooden ball bearings balls placed in grooved wooden tracks would have facilitated the movement of the massive stone slabs.




    Now add another theory to the list. Engineer Garry Lavin, who also happens to be a former BBC presenter, is making the case that giant wicker baskets were deployed by the locals to roll the boulders all that way.


    "I always thought that dragging these huge stones was physically impossible because of the friction on the surface," Lavin told the Daily Mail. "The key thing is the technology was always there around them....Woven structures were everywhere at the time, there are even wells which they have discovered were full with woven basketwork. It's just taking that technology and using it in a new way. It is not without some foundation. It was staring us in the face the whole time."

    Over the summer, Lavin put his theory to the test and he said he successfully moved a one-ton stone in a wicker cage he constructed. Next one his list: Build a larger wicker cradle and try to transport a five-tone slab. He expects to be ready for that test just around summer solstice time next year.
    Just in time to celebrate - if all goes well - at Stonehenge.

    Source http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-501465_1...56-501465.html

    From comments:
    Two problems with this method;

    1. You would get killed pushing it up a hill if you stopped pushed - squashed 'Neolithic man syndrome'

    2. Stonehenge at this time of construction was surrounded by FORESTS - you couldn't drag or roll anything!

    If you wanted to get stones to the monument - you would use a boat - read extracts from my book for details.

    www.prehistoric-britain.co.uk

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    Two problems with this method;

    1. You would get killed pushing it up a hill if you stopped pushed - squashed 'Neolithic man syndrome'

    2. Stonehenge at this time of construction was surrounded by FORESTS - you couldn't drag or roll anything!

    If you wanted to get stones to the monument - you would use a boat - read extracts from my book for details.



    The pushing up a hill would be backed sensibly by people with logs or blocks of some sort and you technically would never push it you would be pulling it. I also find the photo they have here interesting with the poles sticking out the end of the wicker work, the further from the center the poles are the more leverage you have in moving them. For example, I have a tractor that is around 1800 pounds, I am unable to push the tractor but if I grab the tire and roll the tire I can move the tractor without much effort.

    If I were to have to move something like this I would use oxen or draft horses and run a rope over the top of the posts and attach to the bottom post and when pulled it would roll the object rather than pull it, you would just have to keep moving the ropes on either end.

    As far as the forest goes, you simply cut down the trees in a what, forty foot swath or so and lay the logs down as a means of smoothing the path, you might even burn the stumps to keep them out of the way. Twenty years later the forest would be regrown and you hardly be able to tell what happened. I would bet that with a good team of animals you could average 1/2 mph pretty easily which would translate to around 5 miles per day, per stone, per team.

    Good article, I can see where this could be possible.

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