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Thread: Iceland Happiest Place in the World

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    Iceland Happiest Place in the World

    The British daily the Guardian reported today on a study by two economists, Andrew Leigh of the Australian National University, and Justin Wolfers, of the Wharton School.

    The study finds that Icelandi is the best place to live in in the world as determined by "aspects of wellbeing such as life-expectancy, education and living standards," said the Guardian. Australia came in "a close second".

    According to the Guardian, the study "ranked Russians, Ukrainians, Romanians and Bulgarians as the most miserable".

    News station NFS, in turn, claims that the happiest Icelanders are to be found in Hómavík where the festival "Happy Days" will be held this coming weekend. Hólmavík, which has a population "close to four hundred" according to its website, is a fishing town in the north-western part of Iceland and boasts of a "shrimp factory" and "a good harbour".



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    It never crossed my mind to visit Iceland until recently as i have been exposed to more and more images of it.I bet its an amazing place.
    Improvement makes straight roads but the crooked roads without improvment are roads of genius-----
    William Blake

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    Iceland is the happiest place in the world

    It's the "Land of Ice and Fire". To a geologist like myself, it is a fascinating place, a piece of the Reykjanes Ridge (a northward extension of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge), a place where sea-floor spreading can be observed on land. It's also one of the very few places on Earth where geothermal energy is used extensively and successfully. Inasmuch as I dislike flying, I've never gone there, but I might yet.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Egil Skallagrimsson
    It's the "Land of Ice and Fire". To a geologist like myself, it is a fascinating place, a piece of the Reykjanes Ridge (a northward extension of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge), a place where sea-floor spreading can be observed on land. It's also one of the very few places on Earth where geothermal energy is used extensively and successfully. Inasmuch as I dislike flying, I've never gone there, but I might yet.
    I hope you get around to that, sir.
    Mathilda: "I know nothing about eternity, but I should think that what I feel whenever I think of you would have to be eternity."
    Henry: "Yes, Mathilda, we are eternal because we love each other."


    - from "Henry Von Ofterdingen", Novalis

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    I know a dude who went to Iceland with his classmates. Andhe said it was the most awesome journey he's been on! (And that dude have traveled alot!)

    So, by all the picture's I have seen of Iceland, and everything I have read and heard about it, it seems like a fascinating, beautifull and interesting island!

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    I've been to iceland, several years ago though.
    Visited "Thingvellir", the great waterfall of wich I don't remember the name and the blue lagune. The place was filled with americans sent by NATO, quite strange
    And, ofcourse I visited the Geysirs.
    I think a trip back some day would be nice, hopefully I will be exploring the nature a bit more. If I'm correct there are no trees on Iceland, right? I seem to recall so, except for some plantet one. That means great views, not unlike the norwegian plains. Ofcourse I could be lazy and rent a car with extra big wheels and drive across the land, I recall seing lots of them in Reykjavik.

    A truly special place indeed, and: I love the language. Instead of importing words the Icelanders make new words of their own, quite ingenious!

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    It is one of my life goals to leave and see the germanic and celtic lands. Iceland is the purest form of both .

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    No Wonder Iceland Has the Happiest People on Earth

    No wonder Iceland has the happiest people on earth

    Highest birth rate in Europe + highest divorce rate + highest percentage of women working outside the home = the best country in the world in which to live. There has to be something wrong with this equation. Put those three factors together - loads of children, broken homes, absent mothers - and what you have, surely, is a recipe for misery and social chaos. But no. Iceland, the block of sub-Arctic lava to which these statistics apply, tops the latest table of the United Nations Development Programme's (UNDP) Human Development Index rankings, meaning that as a society and as an economy - in terms of wealth, health and education - they are champions of the world. To which one might respond: Yes, but - what with the dark winters and the far from tropical summers - are Icelanders happy? Actually, in so far as one can reliably measure such things, they are. According to a seemingly serious academic study reported in the Guardian in 2006, Icelanders are the happiest people on earth. (The study was lent some credibility by the finding that the Russians were the most unhappy.)
    Oddny Sturludottir, a 31-year-old mother of two, told me she had a good friend who was 25 and had three children by a man who had just left her. 'But she has no sense of crisis at all,' Oddny said. 'She's preparing to get on with her life and her career in a perfectly optimistic frame of mind.' The answer to why the friend perceives no crisis in what any woman in a similar predicament anywhere else in the western world might consider a full-blown catastrophe goes a long way towards explaining why Iceland's 313,000 inhabitants are such a sane, cheerful, successful lot.
    There are plenty of other, more obvious factors. Statistics abound. It is the country with the sixth highest GDP per capita in the world; where people buy the most books; where life expectancy for men is the highest in the world, and not far behind for women; it's the only country in Nato with no armed forces (they were banned 700 years ago); the highest ratio of mobile telephones to population; the fastest-expanding banking system in the world; rocketing export business; crystal-pure air; hot water delivered to all Icelandic households straight from the earth's volcanic bowels; and so on and so forth.
    But none of this happiness would be possible without the hardy self-confidence that defines individual Icelanders, which in turn derives from a society that is culturally geared - as its overwhelming priority - to bring up happy, healthy children, by however many fathers and mothers. A lot of it comes from their Viking ancestors, whose males were rampant looters and rapists, but had the moral consistency at least not to be jealous of the dalliances of their wives - tough women who kept their families fed in the semi-tundra harshness of this north Atlantic island while their husbands forayed, for years at a time, far and wide. As a grandmother I met on my first visit to Iceland, two years ago, explained it: 'The Vikings went abroad and the women ran the show, and they had children with their slaves, and when the Vikings returned they accepted it, in the spirit of the more the merrier.'
    Oddny - a slim, attractive pianist who speaks fluent German, translates English books into Icelandic and works as a city councillor in the capital, Reykjavik - offers a contemporary case in point. Five years ago, when she was studying in Stuttgart, she became pregnant by a German man. During her pregnancy she broke up with the German and reconnected with an old love, a prolific Icelandic writer and painter called Hallgrimur Helgason. The two returned to Iceland where they lived together with the new baby and in due course had a child of their own. Hallgrimur is devoted to both children but Oddny considers it important for her first-born to retain a close link to her biological father. This happens on a regular basis. The German flies over and stays at Oddny and Hallgrimur's far-from-spacious home for a week, sometimes two, at a time.
    'Patchwork families are a tradition here,' explained Oddny, who was off work, at home, on the Thursday morning we met, looking after her youngest child. 'It is common for women to have kids with more than one man. But all are family together.'
    I found this time and again with people I met in Iceland. Oddny's case was not atypical. When a child's birthday comes around, not only do the various sets of parents turn up for the party, the various sets of grandparents - and whole longboats of uncles and aunts - come too. Iceland, lodged in the middle of the North Atlantic with Greenland as its nearest neighbour, was too far from the remit of any but the more zealously obstinate of the medieval Christian missionaries. It is a largely pagan country, as the natives like to see it, unburdened by the taboos that generate so much distress elsewhere. That means they are practical people. Which, in turn, means lots of divorces.
    'That is not something to be proud of,' said Oddny, with a brisk smile, 'but the fact is that Icelanders don't stay in lousy relationships. They just leave.' And the reason they can do so is that society, starting with the parents and grandparents, does not stigmatise them for making that choice. Icelanders are the least hung-up people in the world. Thus the incentive, for example, 'to stay together for the sake of the kids' does not exist. The kids will be just fine, because the family will rally round them and, likely as not, the parents will continue to have a civilised relationship, based on the usually automatic understanding that custody for the children will be shared.....

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2008/may/18/iceland


    Die Sonne scheint noch.

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    If one accepts the notion (originating with early Greek materialist philosophy) that we are essentially mammals, a part of nature and nothing else, it is not surprising to see how this could make sense. Despite the fact that nature is well-ordered, and extremely intricate, it has its own randomness, a number of variations. This would explain the almost infinite variability in human sexuality. We have these notions about monogamy, and normalcy, but people can essentially do whatever they want to when there doesn't exist a system of control to regulate individuals. While I am a champion of marriage insofar as I have a desire to establish a deep emotional bond with one person and stay loyal and maintain that bond, it is not surprising to read about the success of the above mentioned phenomenon.

    For example, in Kerala South India (this phenomenon is dying out due to members of this system moving to other parts of India and adopting the mainstream Indian culture.) historically members of the Nair caste have been practicing a polygamous system based around a household known as the tarawad. A tarawad is a household where a woman may marry multiple husbands as the preservation of the mother's line is seen as paramount. All family members live in one tarawad where the mother wields a goodly amount of power. The mother's eldest brother has the ability to make certain decisions on behalf of the entire household. This system was established by a king in the 16th century in order to better preserve the clan as descent can be traced for sure through the mother.

    I joked once to my friend (whose mother is from Kerala and a subcaste of the Nairs) that we could move there and I could be one of her husbands so long as she agrees never to leave my belongings on the doorstep of the tarawad. (i.e. impossible for her to divorce me.) Apparently my friend's grandmother had multiple husbands.
    SVMDEVSSVMCAESARSVMCAELVMETINFERNVM

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    What Makes Icelanders So Happy?



    Despite harsh winters and economic decline, Iceland ranked third on the UN’s 2016 World Happiness Report. So what makes Icelanders so happy?


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