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Thread: Why Aren't You Christian?

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    Why Aren't You Christian?

    Most of us were probably raised my (more or less) Christian parents or at least in a Christian environment. What made you "change" your religion, what made you take another path?

    Please share your experiences!
    Lík börn leika best.

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    I've probably wrote about my experience before on this forum but: I wasn't raised Christian at all. My grandparents took me to their Congregational church and Sunday school as a youngster but it never interested me then. In fact like most children, I resented having to go. During my school years I was firmly atheist/agnostic like my parents are.

    Then by the time I got to my early twenties I started feeling a need to practice religion, and ended up being Christian by default. It's hard to explain but at the time I had one of those "discover your mortality" experiences where I began to understand the insignificance of life and human endeavors. I never had all that strong of faith or zeal, but read a lot of theology and church history.

    As anyone who has ever read the bible and studied the sects knows, it's hard to make sense of the Christian doctrine and there are no solid guidelines to living life. Paul and the early church fathers took the life of an obscure Jewish leader and made a religion around of him. The doctrines of the Christian faith were slapped together from various parts of Roman-era mystery religions and then were decided to be "of God."

    After visiting several different churches and failing to make sense of the bible I decided to scrap that faith and look elsewhere for inspiration. My ten-year period as a Christian came to an end.

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    I didn't change my religion. If I did, I wouldn't tell anyone. Whether I can say to myself if the religion is valid or not, is a different story altogether.

    For what it is worth, I don't really believe in the "spirituality is an individual matter" idea. Probably a lot here do, but I can't. It sounds like individualism over finding a community and embracing their good values. I only know of one interesting community-based organization in the area that happens to be secular, and that is the Sons Of Norway, for me (I attended my first meeting on Friday. )

    I admire heathenism, since I am most likely tied to it ancestrally, but there needs to be a follow-through, where it has a community behind it. No community, no conversion. One thing I got from reading about heathenism is about the communal aspect of it. That's what I want most out of it. Meeting people, people with families, people who don't have families, people who can help each other, people that see each other as true folk, beyond the fact that our blood comes from the same area in the world.

    I'm skeptical of finding people interested in building the types of organizations that fulfill the role of being integral to the community while still being interested in heathenism. I imagine that if I do find people, they will end up being like hippies, leftists/socialists, gay (or some other sick sex fetish), not-even-European, or all of the above.

    I guess, from what I described, I removed the "spiritual" aspect then from religion. But religious and secular organizations that I like that cater to the type of people like me that wish to attend them are more valuable to me, in terms of myself (I want to stop being reserved, and talk with people) as well as in consideration ofthe whole.

    I attend church for these reasons. No, I do not agree with all that is being said. In fact, though, a lot of it I do agree with; the sermons describe the value of the things I care about, like community, things transcendent over us, anti-modernism and anti-individualism. (Read Galatians 5 to read what I am seeing.) I am a bit uneasy believing that christ is the magic bullet for all ills, but I am not going to have that get in the way of why I look forward to my attendance. (That amongst other things -- sometimes corniness creeps inside the church doors. )

    I would like to see those things that my ancestry were involved in to be part of something greater specific to me and those who will join me in this, but right now I don't feel qualified to make any qualitative decision on what will work and what won't. This would include heathenism and a modified "low-church" Lutheranism (simple, no-frill meetings + an organizational hierarchy + a full acceptance of our ancestral past and the things that they believed in.) I honestly, at this point, don't see how the two would fit, though, nor would I believe that I would get any interested people to help me with this in my area.

    If I decided to convert, though, I would never set myself up to view my conversion as a contradiction to my earlier religion.

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    I was raised Roman Catholic, and was never totally happy in the church even as a small child. I have always believed in a "Higher Power", but Jesus being worshipped as a god was hard foe me to accept.

    After my husband and I were married in 2000, the priest that was @ my church as a small child was indicted for child molestation. The other priest I grew up with and actually loved to hear speak, left the church, married one of his parishiners, and started his own independent church, which my parents now attend.

    I was very disheartend by what happened in my church and thought that the Christian faith had too many contradictions in the teachings...I read the Bible for the first time in my 20's. So, I believed, just didn't know what to believe in.

    My husband became an Odinist in 2002 and I noticed almost immediately an inner peace in him I hadn't before. I started reading at a slow pace material he had on Asatru and Odinism and began to realize that was the Faith I had always believed in. It took me 3 years to "convert", but now I feel the inner peace I was looking for all my life. Glad I have it now for my girls. I do feel that children need some spiritual guidance in the home. And since we as parents are similar in our faith, it will help them as they grow.
    "I can stop trying to discover shortcuts or easy answers to why I feel dissatisfied at times. I am the only one who can make changes, right here and now."
    Dr William Brown

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    I was never interested or drawn to Christianity. I guess Asatru was just more interesting so I started reading about it and it makes more sense to practice the natural religion of my ancestors. My ancestors practiced their religion for thousands of years and it was only say 700 or 800 years ago until they were forcibily converted to a religion they didn't even believed in.

    I mean why would I practice a religion that burned my ancestors and destroyed their heritage? Doesn't makes sense to me.
    What does not kill me, makes me stronger- Friedrich Nietzsche Twilight of the Idols 1888

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    Quote Originally Posted by BSLW
    I mean why would I practice a religion that burned my ancestors and destroyed their heritage? Doesn't makes sense to me.
    Guns don't kill people. People kill people.

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    I'm not Christian, because after all the investment done, it's been harmful to family unity, as Jesus himself said would happen and I don't care about paying lip service to Israeli culture any more than would prefer to engage in political Zionism. Enough European blood has been spilled between factions fighting over which interpretation of foreign religion is worth dying for.

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