View Poll Results: Have you read the Edda?

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  • Yes, I did.

    61 61.00%
  • No, and I am not planning to read it.

    8 8.00%
  • No, not yet. But I'm going to read it soon.

    31 31.00%
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Thread: Have You Read the Edda?

  1. #21
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    I have read Voluspa, the Havamal and some of Vathruthnismal. I'm going to read some more of the Poetic Edda today actually, along with a Norse myths book I have too. I don't have a great deal of time to read books like this at the moment as I am at school and in higher education so I can't really digress much.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tomas
    I have read Voluspa, the Havamal and some of Vathruthnismal. I'm going to read some more of the Poetic Edda today actually, along with a Norse myths book I have too. I don't have a great deal of time to read books like this at the moment as I am at school and in higher education so I can't really digress much.
    Believe me, if you liked it so far, you will still like it. Sounds stupid when it is a collection of poetry...but the stories of the gods and heroes are indeed quite fascinating; and have in fact been copied in their motive at least a thousand times in popular (and not so popular) fiction...

    Either way, may I ask which Norse myths book you have? Just out of pure curiosity?
    -In kalte Schatten versunken... /Germaniens Volk erstarrt / Gefroren von Lügen / In denen die Welt verharrt-
    -Die alte Seele trauernd und verlassen / Verblassend in einer erklärbaren Welt / Schwebend in einem Dunst der Wehmut / Ein Schrei der nur unmerklich gellt-
    -Auch ich verspüre Demut / Vor dem alten Geiste der Ahnen / Wird es mir vergönnt sein / Gen Walhalla aufzufahren?-

    (Heimdalls Wacht, In kalte Schatten versunken, stanzas 4-6)

  3. #23
    Senior Member nordicdusk's Avatar
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    Still trying to get my hands on these countless people are supposed to be getting them for me but alway turn up empty handed.The book stores here are so rubbish i can not even get the most basic titles.:thumbsdow
    Improvement makes straight roads but the crooked roads without improvment are roads of genius-----
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  4. #24
    Senior Member Willow's Avatar
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    Question

    Sorry if i sound a bit stupid, but what's the difference between the prose edda and the poetic edda...?

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Willow
    Sorry if i sound a bit stupid, but what's the difference between the prose edda and the poetic edda...?
    Well, most obviously one is in poetic form and the other is in the prose form (), but it is really not that easy.

    The Poetic Edda is a collection of poems that are expected to date back to roughly the 10th or 11th century (thus in part still in Heathen times, and in part in Christian times), by anonymous poets. It deals with stories of Heroes and Gods. All in all it is a good read, with a lot of wisdom, and it contains one of the most important Heathen writing, the Havamal; which is a bit like a "code of honour".


    The Prose Edda is the work of a single person, Snorri Sturlasson, who collected certain Germanic myths. Now of course Snorri was Christian and lived in the 13th century, so whilst it is a valuable resource, we cannot be sure how accurate he is. The main part, Gylfaginning is told through the eyes of a man who asks questions towards three old men, who are taken to be representations of Odin, to learn about the mythology. Skaldskaparmal tells a few stories of Odin and the gods that are known (as far as I am aware) nowhere else, such as how Mead became the drink of poetry, or how Sif's hair become gold. It is also a good read, since it treats with some things mentioned nowhere else, and because it has a way easier structure than the Poetic Edda does. One has to bear in mind though, whilst reading, that the Prose Edda was written as a textbook for Saklds.

    Well, that is my short account of their content and style - hope it helps you tell the differences. Either way, if you are interested in Germanic Heathenry/Odinism/Asatru then you should inevitable read both of them!
    -In kalte Schatten versunken... /Germaniens Volk erstarrt / Gefroren von Lügen / In denen die Welt verharrt-
    -Die alte Seele trauernd und verlassen / Verblassend in einer erklärbaren Welt / Schwebend in einem Dunst der Wehmut / Ein Schrei der nur unmerklich gellt-
    -Auch ich verspüre Demut / Vor dem alten Geiste der Ahnen / Wird es mir vergönnt sein / Gen Walhalla aufzufahren?-

    (Heimdalls Wacht, In kalte Schatten versunken, stanzas 4-6)

  6. #26
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    Nah, not yet...

    There is still a whole load of Greek Mythology waiting for me to read...it seems to be endless!

    But I promise to read it as soon as I'm done

  7. #27
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    I've read the Poetic Edda a few times (also skipping around in it here and there occasionally). One thing I found helpful if it gets difficult to understand at times is to read through my copy of "The Norse Myths" by Kevin Crossley-Holland. This is not a paraphrase of the Poetic Edda but you may find it helpful.

  8. #28
    Senior Member freya3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BerserkDog
    I've read the Poetic Edda a few times (also skipping around in it here and there occasionally). One thing I found helpful if it gets difficult to understand at times is to read through my copy of "The Norse Myths" by Kevin Crossley-Holland. This is not a paraphrase of the Poetic Edda but you may find it helpful.
    I am currently reading it now with my hubby and it has been difficult to read some of the passages, and we end up on the computer trying to get help. Thanks for posting this book, good stocking stuffer for him
    "I can stop trying to discover shortcuts or easy answers to why I feel dissatisfied at times. I am the only one who can make changes, right here and now."
    Dr William Brown

  9. #29
    Senior Member Sifsvina's Avatar
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    I've read the poetic edda a number of times but always in bits, I finally read the whole thing through this time! Though I did start from the back after a bit so that I'd make sure and get it all:-) Bellows translation this time, not recomended for a first read! Hollander was a much easier read, but I would always get bored by the later eddas that get all "thee, thy, thou, meseemed, 'twould, spak'st, twain, and 'twere", I like there earlier venacular much better.

  10. #30
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    I have read both Eddas and enjoy of reading it! Eddas are the greatest compositions of folk epos.
    :wunjo: :ansuz: :fehu: :tiwaz: :raido: :uruz: :dagaz: :nauthiz: :isa: :raido:
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