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Thread: The Corruption of Iceland's Purity

  1. #21
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    Under tough new rules introduced in 2003 that have been criticized by some human-rights groups, immigrants married to Icelanders cannot apply for a residence permit if they are under 24, and relatives of naturalized citizens may not join their family in Iceland until they are 67.
    Does this mean the immigration laws in Iceland are getting tougher, not more liberal? If so, that's great news.

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    Post The Corruption of Iceland's Purity

    Remoteness Lures Immigrants to Iceland

    By JILL LAWLESS, Associated Press Writer


    REYKJAVIK, Iceland - New Icelandic citizen Bobby Fischer is volatile, uncompromising and defiantly eccentric. He should fit right in.

    Tiny, wind-lashed Iceland has long drawn artists, loners and dreamers attracted by its remoteness, empty spaces and otherworldly, lava-strewn landscape — the very conditions that kept most migrants away and helped forge the proud, independent Icelandic character.

    "What was it Buzz Aldrin said about the moon? 'Magnificent desolation' — that's Iceland," said Jose Tirado, a U.S.-born Buddhist priest who has lived near Reykjavik for four years. "Iceland affords the natural inspiration to spend as much time as you like in your head, formulating ideas."

    As a result, he said, "Everybody here has a guitar or a poem, some artwork or a play."

    Chess icon Fischer, who spent nine months in Japanese detention fighting extradition to the United States, was granted citizenship last week by the country that was the site of his greatest triumph — a 1972 world championship victory in Reykjavik over Cold War rival Boris Spassky of the Soviet Union.

    Chicago-born, Brooklyn-bred Fischer, wanted in the United States for playing a 1992 rematch against Spassky in Yugoslavia in defiance of international sanctions, arrived in Iceland on Thursday. The next day, he told journalists: "I was crazy to leave."

    He may be right. If any country is willing to overlook Fischer's erratic behavior and often extreme pronouncements, it's Iceland.

    The rugged volcanic island whose most famous exports are fish and flamboyant singer Bjork takes a forgiving attitude to personal eccentricity.

    "There's a respect for individual autonomy here," said Tirado, 45, who writes, studies and teaches meditation classes to Icelanders. "In Iceland, you're free enough to be rude. They tolerate anybody, though that doesn't mean they approve."

    Fischer's arrival has drawn attention to Iceland's immigrants, a small but remarkably diverse group in a traditionally homogeneous country.

    Large-scale immigration is a relatively new phenomenon for a country where almost everyone is descended from 9th-century Viking settlers.

    The number of foreign-born residents has doubled in the past decade, but is still only 10,000 people, just more than 3 percent of the population. There are Portuguese construction workers building a major dam in the east of the country, Poles working in northern fish factories and Thai cleaners in Reykjavik's hotels, as well as a smattering of young Europeans and North Americans attracted by the country's coziness, strong social safety net and high standard of living.

    "It was clean, peaceful, isolated — just what I wanted," said Paul F. Nikolov, an American journalist who moved here six years ago. "Not at all like Baltimore."

    The downside is that immigrants often feel like a very visible minority. Many complain it is difficult to gain acceptance from Icelanders.

    "Most people ask me why I am here," said Mustapha Moussaoui, an Algerian who works as a chef in a Reykjavik cafe. "And when you work with Icelanders, they won't treat you as a friend for the first year or two — until they get to know you and respect you."

    Then there's the weather — "depressing, dark, icy."

    "To be honest, it's a really hard life here," said Moussaoui, who is married to an Icelandic woman.

    The bill granting Fischer citizenship passed through Iceland's parliament in just 12 minutes. But for most others, it's not easy to become an Icelander.

    Those who get a residence permit — usually conditional on a job offer — must wait seven years before they can apply for citizenship, a process that involves multiple forms, character references and often extensive medical tests.

    Under tough new rules introduced in 2003 that have been criticized by some human-rights groups, immigrants married to Icelanders cannot apply for a residence permit if they are younger than 24, and relatives of naturalized citizens may not join their family in Iceland until they are 67.

    "Twelve minutes!" said Kenyan-born waitress Sheba Wanjiku, shaking her head in disbelief at Fischer's luck. "It's taking me five years."

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    Senior Member nordnerd's Avatar
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    Iceland: Increase in "Prejudiced" Young People

    Of course, the neo-communist Grapevine prints this news as a "bad sign"...

    Increase in Prejudiced Young People

    According to a study conducted by Red Cross Iceland in 2003, 20% of young people between the ages of 14 to 16 believe that immigrants to Iceland should not have the same rights as other Icelanders. 40% believe that there are too many foreigners in Iceland already. These numbers are actually up from the last survey, which was conducted in 1997.

    www.grapevine.is

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    Aye, it is good news indeed, I’ve noticed the changes, more and more of my friends are changing their opinions of immigration and there is definitely more discussions on immigration now (both in the news and between people) than there was 10 years ago

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    Immigration up in Iceland

    4.20.2005

    Immigration Rises Slightly


    There are now about five hundred more immigrants in Iceland than there were last year, according to Statistics Iceland. At the end of the year there were 10,636 immigrants in Iceland, up from 10,180 at the end of 2003. The 2003 figures actually show a drop in immigration, down from 10,221 in 2002. Also, the immigrant population is smaller in Iceland than it is in other parts of Scandinavia: in Iceland, immigrants comprise 3.6% of the population; in Norway, 4.5%; in Denmark, 5% and in Sweden, 5.3%.

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    Quote Originally Posted by White Iceland
    Also, the immigrant population is smaller in Iceland than it is in other parts of Scandinavia: in Iceland, immigrants comprise 3.6% of the population; in Norway, 4.5%; in Denmark, 5% and in Sweden, 5.3%.
    This is false. Sweden's population is comprised of at least 20% immigrants. I don't know where these people get their statistics, but they're about 20 years old. :

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    Quote Originally Posted by Loki
    This is false. Sweden's population is comprised of at least 20% immigrants. I don't know where these people get their statistics, but they're about 20 years old. :
    Indeed, and Malmö is more like 80%? I found a lovely little "blip" in the Canadian Census data myself.. about 10% of the population identifying itself as "Canadian"; that must be a new ethnicity because I surely have never heard of it. I think conservatively we can assume half of that 10% is made up of immigrants attempting to force naturalization.

    I mean I'm "Canadian" in a national sense, but what the hell are they doing responding with "Canadian" on an ethnicity survey?

    Beware these attempts at false representation, and always read between the lines.

    Remember G.W.Bush says "clear skies initiative" when he is polluting the environment, and "no child left behind" when he cuts funding to childcare programs; Orwellian doublespeak and outright deception--it's going on all over.

    The more sour goes the experiment of multi-culturalism, the greater the lies will become. They don't want you knowing the truth. Keep your eyes open.

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    It should be noted that there are many immigrants not on record.

    Not just illegal ones but rathre to be considered most the ones that are staying with other immigrants and/or have been invited to the hosting country by them.

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    Senior Member Náttfari's Avatar
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    Not to forget those who continue to work here after their visa has expired...

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    I wonder how one might take the path of getting these people out of here so that it might still be universally accepted, since we can't afford international interference.

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