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Thread: Hunt on for vanished Anglo-Saxon Witham Bowl

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    Bryttisc Scildfreca's Avatar
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    Hunt on for vanished Anglo-Saxon Witham Bowl

    Hunt on for vanished Saxon bowl

    Archaeologists hunting an Anglo-Saxon bowl missing for nearly 140 years are calling on the public to check their attics for the silver treasure.

    The Witham Bowl - worth hundreds of thousands of pounds - vanished after an exhibition in Leeds in 1868.

    First found in 1816 in the River Witham, Lincolnshire, it is thought to be the most remarkable piece of pre-Conquest silver found in England.

    The Society of Antiquaries hopes new pictures online will jog memories.
    ...


    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4468691.stm

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    Perhaps somebody somewhere is unwittingly using it as a fruit bowl

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    The Society of Antiquaries website further says:

    "The Society of Antiquaries of London never owned the bowl, but commissioned the image in the 1860s, and then lost it until it turned up in the 1960s in a drawer at its headquarters at Burlington House. It has now put out an international missing water monster alert.

    The society has form on losing things: Cromwell's wart, once the pride of the museum, has not been seen since a long dead secretary took to wearing it as a watch fob."




    I hate that term "Saxon" in the article. The Witham ws the boundary line between Lindsey and the Middle Anglian borderlands of Mercia. Nearby Loveden Hill was a distinctly Anglian cremation cemetery from as early as the Fifth Century. "Saxons", indeed!

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