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Thread: Pizza

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gorm the Old View Post
    It has been my experience that the vast majority of pizzerias in the US are run by Greeks.
    ... The WORD "pizza" comes from the Bay of Naples area,
    ... sought pizza in Taranto, Genova, Livorno, Firenze, Pisa, and Roma. IT DID NOT EXIST.
    I was under the impression that pizza started out in Magna Graecia, that is, the Greek settled portion of southern Italy. Napoli is obviously a Greek name. Naturally, the Classical form little resembled the one we know today, but I'm not surprised you didn't find anything vaguely similar in the northern parts of Italy.

    Do we know of an etymology for the word? Ah, forget it, I'll look myself! :-

    pizza
    1935, from It. pizza, originally "cake, tart, pie," of uncertain origin. Klein suggests a connection with M.Gk. pitta "cake, pie," from Gk. pitta "pitch." See also pita. Pizzeria is attested from 1943, likely in use in Amer.Eng. from 1930s.
    pita
    "thick, flat bread," 1951, from Modern Heb. pita or Modern Gk. petta "bread," perhaps from Gk. peptos "cooked," or somehow connected to pizza (q.v.).
    I was wondering if there was a connection to the Vulgar (Gallo-)Latin that gave us French derived 'piece', a distant cousin of Welsh 'peth' and possibly the Pictish toponymical element 'pit-'....

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Valkyrie View Post
    My family members (and also I) tried to make Pizza often, but honestly I think something is always missing. It tastes good, yes, but there isn´t that specific "Pizza"-flavor you get in a pizzeria. I suppose it has something to do with the pastry?
    My attempts to make own pizza end up in some kind of "Auflauf mit Pizzaauflage". *g* It tastes unique, but not really like a pizza.
    I think it's about the ovens they use in pizzerias, which are specially designed for pizza-making, while we cook them in normal home ovens.

    P.S. Shouldn't this thread be split into a pizza thread?

  3. #23
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    Pizza is a pretty universal dish nowadays, one doesn't have to go to Italian- or Middle-Eastern owned restaurants/chains to get it. It can be found in virtually any restaurant, including the more traditional and locally-owned, not to mention most supermarkets. Many regional variations of pizza have been developed, many bearing only a casual resemblance to the Italian original. Pizza ingredients as well as toppings vary tremendously, based on regional tastes, cultural preferences, and local foods. For example, a Swedish Margherita uses Swedish hard cheese instead of mozzarella and dried oregano instead of fresh basil. In the UK, local substitutions range from bacon for prosciutto to cheddar for mozzarella.

    American pizza is a variety of its own, which differs in many ways from its Italian cousin. Nowadays pizza has basically become the Americans' unofficial national food, and has many regional variations (e.g. California-style, Chicago-style, Detroit-style, NY-style and so forth). As the dish became increasingly popular in the US, it was changed to fit American tastes. Italian pizza crust is typically thin, while American pizza crusts range from thin to very thick or stuffed crust. American pizza has, unlike Italian pizza, vegetable oil or shortening mixed into the dough. Another key difference lays in the type of sauce used. Americans typically use slow-cooked tomato sauce while Italians use olive oil, pureed fresh tomatoes, garlic, and oregano. A typical Italian pizza has hence a herbier taste than the American one.

    Another key difference lays in the variety of toppings, ranging from reindeer in Scandinavia, haggis in the UK or kangaroo, emu or crocodile in Australia. Pizza viennese is made with German sausage as a topping. In Germany, a popular topping is canned tuna with onion. It can stand alone, but it's commonly mixed with vegetables and other toppings (onions, sweet corn). In the Netherlands, the "Double Dutch" is a favorite pizza recipe: double cheese, double onions, and double meat. In Australia, Ham, bacon, and egg pizza is quintessential breakfast fare. Pizzas with seafood such as prawns are also popular. In the US, pepperoni, sausage, mushrooms, onion, green pepper, and extra cheese are the most popular options. There is also a dessert variation served with chocolate and marshmallow in a chocolate shop of Max Brenner in New York City. Garlic fingers is an Atlantic Canadian dish, similar to a pizza in shape and size, and made with similar dough. It is garnished with melted butter, garlic, cheese, and sometimes bacon.

    The biggest pizza eaters in the world are, according to a 2004 survery, the Norwegians, who eat 5,4 kg/year per capita. Frozen pizzas such as Grandiosa are among the most popular. Norway also has a traditional home-made pizza called "lørdagspizza" (Saturday pizza). The dough is shaped to the pan (usually rectangular), then a mix of minced meat, tomato sauce and gratinated cheese follows.

    Anyway, just like in the case of hamburgers, one can find some regional/traditional dishes that are somewhat similar to pizza and could be considered pizza "precursors", like the Zwiebelkuchen, a Southwest German onion cake.



    It is traditionally made of steamed onions, bacon, cream, and caraway seeds on either a yeast dough or a leavened dough. Other recipes include potatoes, apple slices or even cherries.

    Or Flammkuchen, an Alsatian/Palatine/Alemannic German dish, a thin disc of dough covered in crème fraîche, onions, and lardons.



    This was typically a homemade dish which did not make its urban restaurant debut until the "pizza craze" of the 1960s.

    The Vikings are said to have cooked flat, round crusts with an array of toppings. See Vikings may have invented the pizza.

  4. #24
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    Wait...didn't I bring up Pizza today

    See there I gave ya'll something fun to do today!

    What a wide subject pizza can be.
    "We've become a nation of strangers. There seems to be very little in common to bond us to our fellow Americans outside of our immediate families,some don't even have that to fall back on."

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    Yes, like what is your favourite kind of pizza. On mine I like to put ham or salami, tomato sauce, mozzarella, oregano, sweet basil, etc. Some people like pizza with fish like tuna but I don't like it. Maybe because I don't like tuna generally. Yucks.

    Edit: Am I seeing 2 x Mrs. Lyfing thanks on Raven's post? How'd you do that?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sigurd View Post
    That is incorrect. Americans talk of something substantially different when they speak of Pizza than Europeans do. American pizza is usually baked deep-pan, with a huge amount of dough - whilst European pizza is generally about as thick as a fingernail. In the UK you can get both types, marketted as either "deep pan" or "thin crust" - but at home in Austria, it being so close to Italy I have yet to see a pizzeria that does the American style pizza.
    Mainstream fast food pizzas (Dominos, Pizza hut) are usually very thick. Most independent shops have thin neopolitan or thick sicilian style of pizzas. There's also Chicago style which is very thick deep dish pizza or New York style which is the typical thin style. The more common pizza around here is thin and baked in the oven without a pan.

    I hate Dominos and Pizza Hut.

    Now I'm hungry for pizza.

  7. #27
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    It always makes me smile when supporters of multiculturalism use the pizza as an argument in favor of multiculturalism. "Without the immigrants we wouldn't have pizza". I had never realized that the existence of certain food products could mean difference between the success or downfall of a society. Really, what other arguments do they have in favor of multiculturalism? A freaking pizza baked by a sweaty arab? Do you want a gang-rape with that quattro stagioni, or perhaps an exotic disease?

    What do they take us for?

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    Food = culture.
    I think its important to support traditional food and dont support foreign shops atleast

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    In Greece, most pizzerias have been owned and run by locals, as well as most of the other 'foreign' cuisine restaurants (french, mexican, indian, fusion, etc, etc)...since greeks love food so much that they have always been wanting variety in their culinary options ..

    I'm not a big fan of pizza but I prefer it over other types of fast food...and honestly, even if pizzerias were run by italians, I would prefer italian immigrants 1000 times over the balkanian, ex-USSR, and non-european lot we got here

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    Was that the doorbell? Pizzas here!

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