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Thread: Germanic Country Names

  1. #21
    Senior Member Angelcynn Beorn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Auduid View Post
    Oh, how I "relish" the fundamentalist unhappiness when subnational entities of the UK don't want to be reconciled within the name of their top government
    Well since you want to take that sort of condescending tone, i feel now is as good a time as any to point out that 'Great Britain' is not the name of this country or it's 'top government'.

    Nation refers to a group of people with a common shared ethnic bond (see Tony Linsell for more clarification on this), while state refers to the bureaucratic institute which claims sovereignty over a given area and passes laws within it.

    The name of my nation is England (Germanic). The name of the state i live in is the United Kingdom (Latin-Germanic). So get off your high horse about 'Great Britain', it's boring.
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    Member Hama's Avatar
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    I agree with this, Angelcynn Beorn -
    Quote Originally Posted by Angelcynn Beorn View Post
    The name of my nation is England (Germanic). The name of the state i live in is the United Kingdom (Latin-Germanic). So get off your high horse about 'Great Britain', it's boring.
    Great Britain is the name of the largest island in the British Isles. It contains 3 nations - England (Germanic without a doubt) Wales (originally Celtic but now mostly mixed with English blood) and Scotland (as Wales).

    To say that England is not Germanic is wrong. Great Britain was an island of Romano Celts, conquered by my ancestors from Northern Germany/Southern Denmark.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chlodovech View Post
    Yes, the Belgae had their habitat roughly in Northern France and Belgium, although the eastern part of modern Flanders (the provinces of Antwerp, Limburg, Brabant) was considered to be 'Germania inferior' by the Romans. Part of Flanders was still flooded at the time, and not really hospitable, that's why the Belgae prefered France and Wallonia as an area for settlements.

    The Belgae themselves are increasingly more labeled as (predominately or almost completely) Germanic by the Belgian academic world and media. But it's an ongoing debate. There was definitely a Celtic component to be found in the Belgae, to which extent is not known. But the Eburonic tribesman Ambiorix who revolted against the Romans was of Germanic origin.

    However, the Belgae have not that much to do with Flemish culture and my ancestors anyway - as the Frankish settlement in scarcely populated Flanders drove those "Gallic" tribes southward. In that light it was historically not very accurate to name this country 'Belgium' when it was formed in the 19th century - because the young state needed a historical justification of its own right to exist, something which is not a good thing for independent academical research. It sounds ironic, but it's our forefathers who drove the "Belgians" off their lands.



    Frans-Jozef has many linguistic qualities, maybe he'll be able to tell something more, but to the best of my knowledge, it is. I don't ought it impossible that the Franks adopted an old Celtic name for Flanders.
    Dutchmen in Belgium and Englishmen in Britain share a similar situation, by inhabiting lands named for those who were displaced by their ancestors.

    It's ironic how France didn't revert to Gaul during the Neoclassical Enlightenment and its Romantic nationalism. One would have thought that Corsicans in power would have tipped the balance in their own favor, but Napoleon was adamant that he was restoring the empire of Charlemagne rather than Augustus and so, adopted the Merovingian bee motifs, although not the toads, for some reason.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jute View Post
    It is puzzling that all of Germany's neighbors call it something different. Not slight changes in pronunciation to accommodate the language, but totally different roots:

    German: Deutschland
    English: Germany [from latin Germania]
    Dutch: Duitsland
    Danish/Norwegian/Swedish: Tyskland
    Finnish/Estonian: Saksa/Saksamaa
    Latvian/Lithuanian: Vacija/Vokietija
    Spanish/French/Portuguese: Allemannia/Allemagne/Alemanha
    Italian: Tedesco (language), or Germania (country)
    Polish: Niemcy [Interestingly, I have been told this word is a plural in Polish..."The Germanies"; And, less flatteringly, that it comes from the root meaning "idiot".]
    South & West Slavic languages: Nyemacka/Nemecko

    Am I missing some other distinctive ones?
    The name of germany in "scandinavian" comes most likely from the german word thiot meaning members of the people, the name tyskland most likely came to life around the middle ages when south of scandinavia was almost like a german province.

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    I'm also of the opinion that Tyr and Teuton are related.

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