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A Question About English Language in England

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Old Saturday, May 7th, 2011   #1
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A Question About English Language in England

Do traditional dialect variations of English language still exist in England?If so what are the dialects of English now present in England?
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Old Saturday, May 7th, 2011   #2
Gall-Gaidheal
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Dialects? not really, there is colloquial slang, along with accents, but I suppose that is all. RP has crept up the north like a plagued disease.
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Old Saturday, May 7th, 2011   #3
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I would say there are dialects but that they are in rural areas. The west country dialect is amusing when its very heavy. Watch the film 'hot fuz' and see how the old farmer talks.
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Old Sunday, May 8th, 2011   #4
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Edgard is entirely correct. I live in a rural area on the East coast of England. Although I speak standard English without an accent, I can tell you that the Lincolnshire accent and dialect is alive and kicking. My Mothers parents both used the local dialect. The dialects of both East Anglia (as a whole) and Lincolnshire are quite similar, although the East Anglian dialect, in mya opinion, is spoken in a smoother, easier to listen to accent. I believe the Lincolnshire dialect is an 'inbetween' of English and Old English. For example, the word 'kenn' is used instead of 'know'. 'Kenn' means 'know' in German. There are other examples, but I cannot remember. I will have to start a thread listing the similarities sometime soon
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Old Monday, August 1st, 2011   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Edgard View Post
I would say there are dialects but that they are in rural areas. The west country dialect is amusing when its very heavy. Watch the film 'hot fuz' and see how the old farmer talks.
How much dialects of English are still in use now?
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Old Thursday, August 25th, 2011   #6
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Quote:
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How much dialects of English are still in use now?
It probably can't be given a number, but the regional variety is definitely decreasing. I recommend this website for a sample:

http://www.bl.uk/learning/langlit/sounds/index.html

Quote:
You can listen to 71 sound recordings and over 600 short audio clips chosen from two collections of the British Library Sound Archive: the Survey of English Dialects and the Millennium Memory Bank. You’ll hear Londoners discussing marriage and working life, Welsh teenagers talking with pride about being bilingual and the Aristocracy chatting about country houses. You can explore the links between present-day Geordie and our Anglo-Saxon and Viking past or discover why Northern Irish accents are a rich blend of seventeenth century English and Scots. You can study changes in pronunciation among the middle classes or find out how British Asians express their linguistic identity.
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Old Saturday, January 7th, 2012   #7
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Yes they do, but many are getting they watered down, especially in the more populated areas of England.
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Old Wednesday, January 11th, 2012   #8
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Iverson shows some promise.

I would say that there are. There are defiantly many accents, an incredible amount in fact, each with their own spectral severity ranging from the regional accent itself to Received Pronunciation. People pronounce words that are unique to a certain area and really sound nothing like other regional ways of saying the same word, plus there is unique vocabulary used only in specific regional areas. So in this sense it could be said that they are dialects, and I think most countries have this.

I would say dialects and accents are more prevalent in the working classes, rather than the geography of the region. This is due to education and academic careers. Its less prevalent in the cities because migratory people who find jobs because they are qualified and who are obviously well educated, will settle in the urban areas. These people will more often than not speak with Received Pronunciation simply due to their education, and also there is a general belief that Received Pronunciation suggests you are intelligent (which relates to social stigmas). The working classes who are less academic in their livelihoods, will tend to hold on to their regional accents alot better than their more educated counterparts.

I agree that Received Pronunciation (aka R.P, Queen's English, BBC English) is actually very corrosive to native regional accents. They are a very important part of the country and its culture. The causes of the reduction in regional languages is mainly due to television, teaching by "learned" teachers who will more often than not have Received Pronunciation and worse will correct the regional language in favour of their own monocentric Received Pronunciation (and are also migratory educated workers), and finally there is the general belief that there is a correlation between Received Pronunciation and increased intelligence.

Also because the power of England and the UK is held in the South (London being in the south), then there is this push to speak with Received Pronunciation in order to be taken academically and intellectually seriously.

If it gets so bad to the extent that regional accents are starting to die out then hopefully movements would spring up in order to spread awareness of their endangerment which promote to people especially young people that its alright to speak with an accent, even be proud of it. And also a movement that preferably dispells the popular consensus that in order to be or to sound intelligent you have to speak with Received Pronunciation.
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Old Thursday, January 26th, 2012   #9
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I ran into some Cockneys with a friend at the Boy Scout International Jamboree in Holland in 95 and they were barely intelligible, but really nice guys. They were speaking English for sure but with lots of slang and very thick accents. It really sounded like a distinct English dialect to us.
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Old Tuesday, February 7th, 2012   #10
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Actualy here in Wessex, in and around Bristol there is an old dialect spoken by very few these days, that reminisce an old medeival English. I've heard it spoken and it is quite hard to understand!
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