Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

"Sorcery and Religion in Ancient Scandinavia" by Varg Vikernes

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • "Sorcery and Religion in Ancient Scandinavia" by Varg Vikernes

    I discovered a few days ago that Varg Vikernes has finally published his book "Sorcery and Religion in Ancient Scandinavia" which he's been working on over the previous years.

    I will quote him from Burzum.org:

    Paganism: Part XVII - Sorcery and Religion in Ancient Scandinavia

    "Trolldom og Religion i Oldtidens Skandinavia" ("Sorcery and Religion in Ancient Scandinavia") was finished in 2007, but it took some time for me to complete the English translation. Finally now it will be published – but only in English. You can get the details about how to order the book from here.

    To avoid any misconceptions I will tell you a bit about the book. The distributors of the book, Plastichead, says on their homepage that the book "will be of interest not only to black metal and Burzum fans, but also to those with an interest in Norse mythology or European history and social commentators". I do not really understand what they mean by this, but I will claim that the book will only be interesting to those with an interest in Norse mythology and ancient European history. This book is exactly what the title says, a book about sorcery and religion in ancient Scandinavia. It has nothing to do with Burzum, music, politics or anything else for that matter. If you have no interest in ancient European sorcery and religion you shouldn't purchase this book. As simple as that.

    If you on the other hand have an interest in ancient European sorcery and religion you definately should purchase this book. Unveiled in this book is the belief system of our forefathers, the ancient calender, the secrets of the runes and each and every high festival is described. You can read this book to learn how to practise the ancient European religion, or even the ancient sorcery tradition, or you can read this book simply to learn more about our own culture.

    Now, the special thing with this book is that it is the first of its kind. You will not find the information in this book anywhere else, and you will understad that if you read the book. You might wonder how on Earth I can believe that this book is so special, compared to other books about the same subject, and you might wonder why not some less weird person has written a book like this before. Why me? Why this nutcase Norwegian sociopath? The fact is that it could only be written by a person like me; a person with no respect for general conventions whatsoever, with a very different perspective and an even more different approach. If you don't ask the right questions you will never find the right answers. Most writers think conventionally, and therefore they tend to just repeat what others have said before them. They accept the common "truths" and never question anything told them by their professors and other lecturers. They just copy and repeat – and find nothing new. I don't just copy and repeat. I never did, and that's why I have found some important answers other writers have not found before.

    When I die I hope that I will be remembered as the writer of this book more than anything else. Music is my escape into my own world, and it doesn't really matter one way or the other, but this book is important to our European culture. I spent some 15 years of my life studying to be able to write this book, and I hope at least some of you will appreciate it.

    Yours truly,
    Vargr í véum Vikarnes
    Bergen the 30th of August 2011
    Here's the link with information on how to order it, including pictures of the limited and normal edition:

    http://www.burzum.org/eng/library/so...ndinavia.shtml

    "Man evolved in cooperating groups united by common cultural and genetic ties, and it is only in such a setting that the individual can feel truly free, and truly protected. Men cannot live happily alone and without values or any sense of identity…" - Alain de Benoist
    Motpol.nu - Alternative Right - Arktos.com
    Click here for a sound-track to my posts.

  • #2
    If you're interested in studying the Runes/ancient Germanic culture/religion/, then someone like Stephen Flowers would be a much better source for knowledge than some two-bit, opportunistic con artist like Count Grishnackh.
    Omnia risus et omnis pulvis et omnia nihil - HPL

    "Oh, you should never, never doubt what nobody is sure about." - Willy Wonka

    “niemand bleibt hier” - Maria Orsic

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Schopenhauer View Post
      If you're interested in studying the Runes/ancient Germanic culture/religion/, then someone like Stephen Flowers would be a much better source for knowledge than some two-bit, opportunistic con artist like Count Grishnackh.
      Thanks for the suggestion. I've read a couple of his book under the synonym Edred Thorson, mainly dealing with the Runic mysteries.
      One does not exclude the other, I'd say.
      "Man evolved in cooperating groups united by common cultural and genetic ties, and it is only in such a setting that the individual can feel truly free, and truly protected. Men cannot live happily alone and without values or any sense of identity…" - Alain de Benoist
      Motpol.nu - Alternative Right - Arktos.com
      Click here for a sound-track to my posts.

      Comment


      • #4
        Very glad that the book gets finally published. Only in december though.... *sigh*
        Ein Leben ist nichts, deine Sprosse sind alles
        Aller Sturm nimmt nichts, weil dein Wurzelgriff zu stark ist
        und endet meine Frist, weiss ich dass du noch da bist
        Gefürchtet von der Zeit, mein Baum, mein Stamm in Ewigkeit

        sigpic

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Olavsson View Post
          Thanks for the suggestion. I've read a couple of his book under the synonym Edred Thorson, mainly dealing with the Runic mysteries.
          One does not exclude the other, I'd say.
          I would tell anyone to read whatever they like regardless of what anyone else thinks.

          Still, if you want to study this particular aspect of Germanic culture/tradition, the works of Stephen Flowers/Edred Thorson and the Rune Gild would, certainly, be an excellent place to begin.
          Omnia risus et omnis pulvis et omnia nihil - HPL

          "Oh, you should never, never doubt what nobody is sure about." - Willy Wonka

          “niemand bleibt hier” - Maria Orsic

          Comment


          • #6
            I'll be ordering my copy in a couple minutes- sounds like a seriously awesome read.
            Last edited by Ælfrun; Tuesday, September 13th, 2011, 01:56 AM. Reason: 08. Defamation against Skadi

            Comment


            • #7
              Thorrson might be good for a general overview but he is pretty flowery when it comes to the runes. After reading what he said I still didn't have a clue what the runes are. As Thorsson is also on a different path he is only half-part heathen. His is a mixed view. He comes from a different tradition and then looks at heathenry.

              Every point of view is welcome and I certainly apreciate what he wrote, but I was unable to suck a lot out of it.

              I prefer Varg's way to transform oneself into a heathen also internally. From that point of view one has a very different approach and what he finds might just come from his whole being. It might be good or might not be good but it seems to be a lot more honest.

              I read his point of view that the Gods are really the planets. I do disagree with that. Though he showed some interesting connection he failed to convince me that Gods are planets.

              I am interested in any practical material for self-experiments. If he offers some, then the book is worth to buy.
              weel nich will dieken dej mot wieken

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Ocko View Post
                Thorrson might be good for a general overview but he is pretty flowery when it comes to the runes. After reading what he said I still didn't have a clue what the runes are. As Thorsson is also on a different path he is only half-part heathen. His is a mixed view. He comes from a different tradition and then looks at heathenry.
                Reyn til Runa!
                Omnia risus et omnis pulvis et omnia nihil - HPL

                "Oh, you should never, never doubt what nobody is sure about." - Willy Wonka

                “niemand bleibt hier” - Maria Orsic

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Ocko View Post
                  I read his point of view that the Gods are really the planets. I do disagree with that. Though he showed some interesting connection he failed to convince me that Gods are planets.
                  Well, yes, he wrote in an article that the old heathen gods could have some sort of connection to the planets of our solar system, which is not an especially original statement since it's already well-known that our planets are named after the Roman gods.
                  However, this is far from the complete picture, and Vikernes does of course also look at the gods as 'archetypes', symbolic language, essential principles and so on.
                  "Man evolved in cooperating groups united by common cultural and genetic ties, and it is only in such a setting that the individual can feel truly free, and truly protected. Men cannot live happily alone and without values or any sense of identity…" - Alain de Benoist
                  Motpol.nu - Alternative Right - Arktos.com
                  Click here for a sound-track to my posts.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I've always liked Edred's books..

                    But, Varg sure does tell a nice "rune-poem"..

                    Paganism: Part XI - The Esoteric Runes

                    Later,
                    -Lyfing
                    Temple of Wotan
                    Germanic Heathenry Forum

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      sorcery is a tricky word.

                      Generally one divides between shamans (the german word for it is Lachsner) and a sorcerer.

                      The difference is not in the method because both use the same, the difference lies in the ethical use of the 'magic'.

                      A sorcerer would use it for his own interest, a shaman would use it for the interest of a client and do it, when ethical.

                      Ethical for an old german was not the 10 commandments of the bible but was a set of loyalties, what is good for the tribe is good , what is bad for the tribe is bad.

                      Loyalties also may have belonged to one's God, to some natural spirits etc.

                      So if you would kill an enemy of the tribe (let's say a king of an attacking group) through magic that would be considered as helpful. (though from a God's point of view it could be that the two kings have to fight and the one Odin chose would lose to become an einherjar).

                      Nowadays in neoshamanism to kill somebody is unethical that would be preserved for a higher force. In general a shaman would try nowadays for a peaceful future.


                      Sorcery can be divided into two groups: Earth-sorcery, more or less bring bad weather and destroy a harvest to punish or destroy someone. Many witches, who obviously knew how to manipulate wheather, have been accused of just that.

                      war-sorcery to find out tactics, strategy, current position, make somebody blind, make somebodies weapons blunt etc.

                      But in the second case I would not call it sorcery, it is basically warfare with different means. Kings were supposed to know those things as mentioned in the Eddas and employ it for the good of their people.

                      A king who would bring hail to the people would be kept, one who didn't was considered out of line with the Gods and would be sacrificed.
                      weel nich will dieken dej mot wieken

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I read the book (well, actually read the first 50 pages and browsed through the rest) and am pretty much disappointed. Vikernes' own theories, which are the main foundation of this book, are pretty much way out there.

                        The fact that he arrogantly states that we need to accept that everything we think we know about Germanic mythology is wrong and that he blatantly refuses give a real insight on where he got his theories or why they are supposed to be valid, doesn't help his cause one bit. He just goes on and on, changes details of myths as he goes along to "prove" his point. In the end, you're supposed to be convinced that Balðr is Bragi and Vali, Nanna is Iðunn, Höðr is Fenrir, Heimdall is both Hermoðr and the Ygdrassil itself, that every dominion of the gods is actually the name of a month and that virtually every myth and subsequent fairy tale describes a journey to the realm of the dead and back.

                        I'm willing to be open-minded on a lot of things, but you can't expect people to be happy with throwing every Germanic myth on one big pile and stating that everything is basically one and the same thing.

                        The whole book has a very cheap and flimsy feel to it. For instance, it doesn't have a literature list. Sure, Vikernes states that only two books were really of any help, but that's just not how you put together a decent and credible book. If you're an author and you come up with a whole set of new etymological reconstructions of divine names, you'd better be able to back them up one way or another.

                        I liked his "Germansk mytologi og verdensanskuelse", even though that one had plenty of weirdness as well (the Sirius-stuff, the ariosophy/theosophy-hints), but this one is just too much. Sorry.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks for the review, Volkwin. I'm still waiting for my own copy, so I haven't had the chance to make my own opinion on it yet...
                          "Man evolved in cooperating groups united by common cultural and genetic ties, and it is only in such a setting that the individual can feel truly free, and truly protected. Men cannot live happily alone and without values or any sense of identity…" - Alain de Benoist
                          Motpol.nu - Alternative Right - Arktos.com
                          Click here for a sound-track to my posts.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            No problem, Olavsson. I'm curious to hear what other people have to say about it, though. In the meanwhile, I read the whole thing and my thoughts on the book haven't improved one bit.

                            The new theories Vikernes came up with, are apparently lifted from the book "The Golden Bough" by James George Frazer, as Vikernes indeed states himself. The interesting thing is that those specific theories, such as the one of the year cycle, seem to have been discredited by scholars for a long time now.

                            I wonder what's next? A new, weird book in about 5-10 years from now, with an all new theory on how Asgarðr in fact is Atlantis?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Uhh, Stephen Flowers is every bit as "out there" as Varg Vikernes. And I love him for it. People are too "down to earth" these days. It's a spiritual disease methinks. Vikernes is highly intelligent. "Two bit"? That's kind of shitty to say. I like reading Varg's material. You know who else is "out there"? Julius Evola, Miguel Serrano and C.G. Jung ... and they're ALL pure geniuses. No one you can mention can out-think these men.

                              If you bed to differ please read "Black Runa" and "Secret of the Gothick God of Darkness" by Flowers.
                              "The mystery and secret of Wotan is not that "knowledge" of him is passed along through clandestine cults or even through the re-discovery of old books and texts--but rather that such knowledge is actually encoded in a mysterious way in the DNA, in the very genetic material, of those who are descended from him." - Secret of the Gothick God of Darkness

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X