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Dagna
Tuesday, May 13th, 2008, 08:03 PM
The Faroe Islands or Faeroe Islands or simply Faroe(s) or Faeroes (Faroese: Føroyar, meaning "Sheep Islands", Danish: Færøerne, Old Norse: Færeyjar) are a group of islands in Northern Europe, between the Norwegian Sea and the North Atlantic Ocean, roughly equidistant between Iceland, Scotland, and Norway. They have been an autonomous province of the Kingdom of Denmark since 1948, making it a member of the Rigsfællesskab. The Faroese have, over the years, taken control of most matters except defence (though they have a native coast guard), foreign affairs and the legal system. These three areas are the responsibility of Denmark.

The Faroes have close traditional ties to Iceland, Shetland, Orkney, the Outer Hebrides and Greenland. The archipelago was politically detached from Norway in 1814. The Faroes are represented in the Nordic Council as a part of the Danish delegation.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faroe_Islands

The Faroese or Faroe Islanders (Føroyingar) are a small ethnic group in Northern Europe of Norse and Celtic origins. They are mostly found in the Faroe Islands, Iceland, Denmark, Norway and Australia.

The Faroese language is a West Nordic language, closely related to Icelandic, and more distantly to western Norwegian dialects.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/62/Faroese_folk_dance_club_from_vagar.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faroese_people


Do you believe the Faroese constitute a distinct ethnic group? Why or why not?

Allenson
Tuesday, May 13th, 2008, 08:15 PM
I would say at this point, if they don't, then they're pretty darn close. I read a book on the Faroes a few years back (can't remember the title off the top of my head). It was written by an outsider and by all accounts of the natives, they certainly thought of themselves as Faroese and not particularly Danish. In fact, they were portrayed in the book as being a bit resentful of Denmark.

Jónurin
Thursday, May 15th, 2008, 03:13 AM
We (the Faroese) are not Danish. No-one who is Faroese would say so. Not even the loyalists. Sometimes though, it's useful to pretend to be Danish, because it means I can have a Danish passport and avoid paying for a visa when travelling to e.g. Britain.;)

Siebenbürgerin
Saturday, May 17th, 2008, 01:45 PM
I would consider the Faroese a separate Ethnic Group from the Danish. They seem to have a separate Culture and Language too. Here what I read on their Origins and Culture:

The Faroes were mainly settled about 1,100 years ago by Norwegian Vikings who took over from Celtic settlers, mostly Irish monks, who had arrived approximately three centuries earlier. The population’s first language is Faroese, a Scandinavian language with strong resemblance to Old Norse, but children learn Danish and English in school. Emigration, particularly to Denmark, has drained the population and skill base, an ongoing phenomenon which peaked during an economic crisis from 1992 to 1996. Faroese society is undergoing further economic changes, principally due to the continuing decline of agriculture and fishing combined with the search for oil in the North Sea and efforts to substantially increase tourism. The expectation of this shift has resulted in intense debate, mainly related to how to stop oil revenue causing more societal problems than it solves. Nonetheless, Faroese are proud of their rich culture and national heritage and strongly seek to preserve it.

My Source (http://forums.skadi.net/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.isla ndvulnerability.org%2Ffaroes.html).

Here some Pictures of Costumes I found.

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/113/266104933_a24023ecce.jpg

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/24/43425727_9d5d5971ad.jpg

Papa Koos
Wednesday, May 28th, 2008, 10:45 PM
It seems to me that they are a disctinct ethnic group given the centuries of isolation. Yes they've had intermittent contact with the Norse (mostly) and (somewhat less) with the Celts, but no doubt they have developed their own unique dialect, customs, music, and folkways.
Racially I think they (like the Icelanders) are some of the purist folks in Northern Europe.

Blood_Axis
Thursday, May 29th, 2008, 10:42 AM
Yes, I also believe they do. There's something unique about their culture. :)

Linda Trostenhatten
Thursday, May 29th, 2008, 07:02 PM
I heard something about the Bronx in NY being named after a faroe islander priestsson named Jonas Bronx. When I was there I went to their geological museum and they sad the island were formed so and so and that some parts of it were older and I remember that I thought the younger parts somehow looked more like Iceland. It was a funny thing.

Slætartind
Thursday, October 16th, 2008, 05:46 AM
Thanks for the interest. Yeah i think we are a special ethnic grope. And as one of my country man said.. it´s probably only royals who claim we´re not :P

Faroese descend from Vikings and Celtics like Icelanders. Eventhough more Scandinavian DNA has been found in the Faroese men and more Scottish DNA has been found in the Faroese women compared to Iceland.

According to European journal of genetics then:
Faroese:
Male: 87% or more Scandinavian.
Female: 83% Scottish.

Icelandic:
Male: 66% Scandinavian
Female: 60% Scottish.

But i would like to point out that Scottish people already have a lot of Scandinavian influence because of the Vikings etc...
Scots are Saxons, Anglos, Celtic and Nordics for what I know of.

torvheyggur
Friday, April 24th, 2009, 02:08 PM
Slætartind answered that question very good about the faroese ethnicity. Those Norwegians that went West to the Faroes and did not bring a wife/woman, just took/stole one from Scotland or Ireland:-)

TheGreatest
Thursday, April 30th, 2009, 01:14 PM
It's cause those Scandinavian women were too demanding and didn't like traveling on boats!

Easier to get around the misses and find a nice Scottish lass, all you need is a longboat, some booze and fun times await! :D :thumbup

Winkelried
Friday, May 8th, 2009, 08:56 PM
Yes. They see themselves as an ethnic group, the outside sees them as an ethnic group, they have an own language, culture et cetera. What is missing?

Slætartind
Tuesday, May 26th, 2009, 04:58 AM
Here is a alternative picture. From the streets in Tórshavn in the national day.

Blood_Axis
Tuesday, May 26th, 2009, 11:20 AM
Personally, the more acquainted I get with Faroese music and culture, the more I like it and consider it precious and worthy of preservation :thumbsup

Funny story:

I play in a silly online song contest with players from all over the world. Each player picks a country to represent from the "available countries" list, and then one has to pick an artist from that country and submit a song in the form of a Youtube video.

It's like the Eurovision contest, only global, really silly and really fun, also interesting as one gets to know local artists from different countries. :P

At some point the players became too many and there were not enough countries for everyone.

So the game administrator created new positions for the Faroe Islands, Åland Islands and Greenland, but those were supposed to "borrow" songs from their "mother countries" (Denmark and Finland).

I instantly dropped the country I was playing with and picked the Faroe Islands! :) I thought that was the perfect opportunity to learn more about the country but also make it known to others as well.

The administrator expected me to submit a Danish song, but I specified I will be submitting Faroese artists only.

He was like "what do you mean, Faroese music? Do the Faroese make music? :-O"
and I laughed and sent him a beautiful song by Eivør (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0vUv51EgLSU) which did marvellously, passed the semi-finals and climbed on the top 10 in the final :bravo

The other players were also stunned to see that the Faroe Islands have their own musicians, and great musicians at that!
Next I submitted a song from the rock band "The Dreams" and I have managed to compile a long list of artists to choose from, for the next game rounds :)

Slætartind
Tuesday, May 26th, 2009, 01:25 PM
Thank you very much for sharing that story Blood Axis :)
Well yeah we have many bands. Of course we have.

I think that many foreigners tend to be a bit mislead about Faroe Islands. When I seek the internet then it turns out that I often see traditional houses of Faroe Islands depicted, it´s seldom when I read online articles about Faroe Islands that I think that they are spot on. I also see lot of Old Faroese depicted.

Faroe Islands is not a primitive country with nature people.

Sometimes foreigners see pictures such as this http://www.phototravels.net/faroe-islands/N0008/faroes-kalsoy-trollanes-55.2.jpg And assume that such houses are normal.. But such houses are not used by people!

This is a more realistic view over the building style. This is Klaksvík. The second largest city. This is the most common building styles both in Tòrshavn and of all the villages.
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/146/429541380_e77e8ab96e.jpg

Otherwise, I think that we Faroese are way too passive when it comes to branding our country unfortunately.

Sigurd
Tuesday, May 26th, 2009, 03:25 PM
Next I submitted a song from the rock band "The Dreams" and I have managed to compile a long list of artists to choose from, for the next game rounds :)

I suppose TÝR could always be an option, too. Heavier than most will like it, but considering that their second album became the best-selling album in the Faroes in 2005, I suppose it's not that "out of the boundaries". Lest of course, you're talking more classical or so. ;)

I remember for the "NoFo-Vision" contest in 2007 I submitted Tyr's "Regin Smidur" (in the absence of Faroese members to do so), and it took the grande price of Pos. #1. :D

Blod og Jord
Saturday, October 17th, 2009, 10:39 AM
The Faroese are a distinct ethnic group for certain.
They aren't Danish and not even the Danes think so.
The Faroes are an autonomous province of Denmark.
Usually the autonomous provinces have distinct ethnic groups.

Sturmbaon
Sunday, October 18th, 2009, 02:49 AM
Yes, they are a distinct group.
Very lovely nation:thumbup

frippardthree
Sunday, November 1st, 2009, 05:59 AM
I was not very familiar with them, until' reading this thread, but they do seem to have a very rich heritage, history, and legacy. I am very impressed by their architecture.

The Faroe Islands were one of the last territories on the planet to be discovered and populated. The first settlers are said to have been Irish monks who arrived in the year 700 and something, there are no signs of people having lived here before that so the birds had it to themselves. Norsemen arrived in the early 800's. For the first 200 years or so Faroes was a free country but it then came under foreign power - first Norway and then Denmark.

During the Second World War, when the Germans occupied Denmark, Faroes helped feed Britain by sailing there with fish; they sailed under the new Faroese flag called Merkið, which the British officially recognised.

There had been a strong movement for independence for many years and in 1946 a referendum was held and the majority chose independence. This caused concern in Denmark and the Danish government dissolved the Parliament. A new Parliament was elected in which there was not a majority for independence. In 1948 the Danish Parliament passed the Home Rule Act making Faroes a self-governing state inside the Danish Kingdom. The Act recognised the Faroese flag and the Faroese language.

In recent times, the number of people wanting independence for their nation has increased considerably and in 1998 the Parliamentary elections resulted in a coalition taking power whose main promise was to set in motion a process towards full sovereignty. That process is now underway despite changes in the parliament.

Retrieved From:http://www.framtak.com/info/fo_flag.html


http://www.framtak.com/pics/top/photo26.jpghttp://www.framtak.com/pics/top/photo28.jpghttp://www.framtak.com/pics/top/photo27.jpg

Faroese (føroyskt, pronounced [ˈføːɹɪst] or [ˈføːɹɪʂt]), often also spelled Faeroese (cf. Merriam-Webster, which prefers this spelling), is a West Nordic or West Scandinavian language spoken by 48,000 people in the Faroe Islands and about 25,000 Faroese in Denmark and elsewhere. It is one of three insular Scandinavian languages descended from the Old Norse language spoken in Scandinavia in the Viking Age, the others being Icelandic and the extinct Norn, which is thought to have been mutually intelligible with Faroese. Icelandic and Faroese are not mutually intelligible in speech, but the written languages resemble each other quite closely.

Full Article:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faroese_language

The Faroese or Faroe Islanders (Føroyingar) are the people of the Faroe Islands in Northern Europe of Celtic and Norse origins.[4] About 21,000 Faroese live in neighbouring countries, particularly in Denmark, Iceland and Norway.

The Faroese language is a West Nordic language, closely related to Icelandic and more distantly to western Norwegian dialects.

The first colonists were Gaelic hermits and monks who arrived in the 6th century.

Later from around 650 the Norse-Gaels came and brought Norse culture and language to the islands. Little is known about this period, thus giving room for speculation. A single source mentions early settlement, the Icelandic Færeyinga Saga. It was written somewhere around 1200, and it explains events taking place about 300 years earlier. According to the saga, many Norsemen objected the Norwegian king's unification politics and thus fled to other countries, including the new found places in the west.

Historians have understood since the time of the Færeyinga Saga that the Viking Grímur Kamban was the first settler in the Faroes. The Norwegians must have known about the isles before leaving Norway. If Grímur Kamban had settled some time earlier, this could explain the Norwegians knowing about them. Anorther and more logical explanation might be that the Norwegians became to know about the islands by the Gaels of Scotland and Ireland.

While Grímur is an Old Norse first name, Kamban indicates a Celtic origin. Thus he could have been a man from Ireland, Western Isles or Isle of Man, where the Vikings already had settlements. Some place names from the oldest settlements on the Faroes suggest that some of the settlers perhaps came from the Scottish islands and the British coast.

Recent DNA analyses have revealed that Y chromosomes, tracing male descent, are 87% Scandinavian.[5] The studies show that mitochondrial DNA, tracing female descent, is 84% Scottish / Irish.[6]

Retrieved From:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faroese_people

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/62/Faroese_folk_dance_club_from_vagar.jpg/300px-Faroese_folk_dance_club_from_vagar.jpght tp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/60/Faroese_girls_in_costume.jpg/180px-Faroese_girls_in_costume.jpg

The new church in Toftir is called "Fríðríkskirkjan", after Dean Fríðrikkur Petersen.
It is considered by many as an architectural masterpiece. The church has, for example, an altarpiece, communion table, and pulpit, which are made of Swedish granite. The baptismal font is of Faroese stone. The lighting was especially designed for the church by the Faroese architect Høgni Larsen. This is a very interesting church and definitely worth a visit.

Retrieved From:http://www.framtak.com/eysturoy/places/churches.html

http://www.framtak.com/eysturoy/images/nes_new.jpg

The earliest known inhabitants were Celtic. In the 8th cent. A.D. the islands were settled by Norsemen. In the early 11th cent. they became part of the kingdom of Norway and were Christianized. The population was nearly wiped out by an outbreak of black plague in the 14th cent. and was soon after replaced by Norwegian settlers. Along with Norway, the Faeroes passed under Danish rule in 1380, and they remained Danish after the Treaty of Kiel (1814) transferred Norway from the Danish to the Swedish crown. A nationalist movement in the 19th cent. led to the revival of Faeroese, a language akin to Icelandic, and there is an extensive native literature.

In World War II, Great Britain established (1940) a protectorate over the islands after the German occupation of Denmark. After the war there was considerable sentiment for full independence, and following a plebiscite in 1946, the islands' parliament proclaimed independence. The Danish king dissolved the Lagting, and after a new parliament was elected, the proclamation was reversed. However, in 1948 the Faeroese obtained home rule from Denmark. Since 1953 they have sent two representatives to the Danish parliament. The Faeroes did not join the European Community (EC; now the European Union) with Denmark in 1972 because it would have opened their fishing waters to other EC members. In 1977 the fishing limit was extended to 200 nautical mi (370 km). Sentiment in favor of independence remains strong among many islanders.

Retrieved From:http://www.answers.com/topic/faroe-islands

johanpeturdam
Monday, November 23rd, 2009, 06:09 PM
I suppose TÝR could always be an option, too. Heavier than most will like it, but considering that their second album became the best-selling album in the Faroes in 2005, I suppose it's not that "out of the boundaries". Lest of course, you're talking more classical or so. ;)

I remember for the "NoFo-Vision" contest in 2007 I submitted Tyr's "Regin Smidur" (in the absence of Faroese members to do so), and it took the grande price of Pos. #1. :D

Heck, their newest album "By the Light of the Northern Star" even charted in Germany. Was only for one week though and they were number 88, but it's still a chart position, and the highest any Faroese band has had outside the Nordic countries. :) (AFAIK, at least).

GreenIce
Wednesday, February 17th, 2010, 04:43 PM
The Faroese are certainly a distinct ethnic group not to be confused with others. However, there's been an enormous Danish influence, many of them bear Danish or Danicised names, their colloquial language is full of Danish words and expressions, almost 1/3 of the whole Faroese nation lives in Denmark and many of those who stay at home have lived and/or studied in Denmark previously. However, despite such a strong influence from Denmark they do preserve their identity and culture.

Sedtrogen
Tuesday, October 26th, 2010, 12:43 PM
Okay, almost everyone here points out that the Faeroese people aren't Danish... But that's already pretty obvious since they're all descended from Norwegian settlers (and Celts), not Danish. I would be more interested in finding out if anyone would consider them a type of Norwegian, or if everyone considers them an ethnic group in their own right. They're really not that different from the mainland Norwegians, and share a lot of common traits. So, Norwegian or not?

Oh, and saying that they're a people of their own just because their language is very different from standard Norwegian is not a good argument. For instance, here in Sweden we have Dalecarlian, the dialect group of the province Dalecarlia, which in its northern dialects are completely unintelligible to anyone else in Sweden (I actually understand Faeroese better than northern Dalecarlian). No one is claiming that Dalecarlians aren't Swedish.

Thulean
Sunday, October 31st, 2010, 02:38 AM
Centuries of isolation, your own language, your own unique customs existing nowhere else on the planet, such as their rich dancing tradition...how much more does a nation need to do to proof they are a separate ethnic group? I cannot understand why they have not become an independent nation a long time ago. They got far more resources than Denmark, and therefore most likely a much brighter future ahead of them, so being under Danish control makes absolutely no sense for them.

wittwer
Tuesday, November 2nd, 2010, 04:29 PM
We (the Faroese) are not Danish. No-one who is Faroese would say so. Not even the loyalists. Sometimes though, it's useful to pretend to be Danish, because it means I can have a Danish passport and avoid paying for a visa when travelling to e.g. Britain.;)

There you have it. The native population thinks itself distinct. Although they like to think of themselves as "Danish" on occasion... ;)

Spydskjold
Wednesday, November 24th, 2010, 09:14 PM
We (the Faroese) are not Danish. No-one who is Faroese would say so. Not even the loyalists. Sometimes though, it's useful to pretend to be Danish, because it means I can have a Danish passport and avoid paying for a visa when travelling to e.g. Britain.;)
There you have it. The native population thinks itself distinct. Although they like to think of themselves as "Danish" on occasion... ;)
This is not a valid argument. If it was, then anyone feeling X ethnic group would belong to X ethnic group, and you won't have to think very long to see why this is faulty.

However I do agree that the Faeroese people are distinct. Racially, not anymore than danes, norwegians and swedes are, and culturally not much either. But they have maintained their own traditions to a much larger degree, and this is the main factor in distinguishing the faeroese from the rest of Scandinavia.

This is based on my own observations and interactions.
I won't debate against scottish DNA strains, as it seems likely, but considering how much of the Anglo-Saxon gene pool originates in Northern Europe, particularly Scandinavia, then it seems well within reason to consider Faeroese as Scandinavian as Denmark, Norway and Sweden.

Voth
Saturday, December 4th, 2010, 11:36 AM
Unfortunately, "ethnic" has two distinct meanings that can be convincingly argued in one direction or the other, so many of the arguments I'm reading here are based on semantic disagreements. But essentially, since the majority of Faroese are Faroese by lineage, and certainly not genotypically Danish (last I checked), combined with relatively low immigration... and Faroese by ethnolinguistic type, the Faroese veritably represent a distinct ethnic group.