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Talan
Saturday, February 2nd, 2008, 07:37 AM
Do you give your surname first? Do you adopt a religious name?

mischak
Saturday, February 2nd, 2008, 07:54 AM
I usually just say my first name..

Beornulf
Saturday, February 2nd, 2008, 08:10 AM
I tend to say hi or hello.

Soldier of Wodann
Saturday, February 2nd, 2008, 08:18 AM
I tend to glare at people and ask why they have the audacity to address me without bowing.

Brynhild
Saturday, February 2nd, 2008, 08:42 AM
I tend to glare at people and ask why they have the audacity to address me without bowing.

LOL

My first name is sufficient.

Blood_Axis
Saturday, February 2nd, 2008, 09:38 AM
Princess Consuela Banana Hammock!

Nah, my first name would do it. :p

Phlegethon
Saturday, February 2nd, 2008, 09:50 AM
Call me Ishmael.

Talan
Saturday, February 2nd, 2008, 09:57 AM
I tend to glare at people and ask why they have the audacity to address me without bowing.

LOL. Seriously though... you people use baptismal names amongst yourselves?

OneEnglishNorman
Saturday, February 2nd, 2008, 10:29 AM
I give my full name.

I liked in the old days how men would call each other by their surnames. And would only call their close friends and family by their forenames. Just more respectful.

Conversely, someone you know very well you often refer to just by their surname, at least in England this exists, deriving from school days when our teachers would yell out our surname in class.

Beornulf
Saturday, February 2nd, 2008, 11:07 AM
If they respond to my greeting well enough I sometimes sniff their hair.

In all seriousness though a decent first impression tends to be good, so a handshake is generally what follows if I have an interest in talking to them.

I'm interested to know why you're asking and in what context?

Ulvhedin
Saturday, February 2nd, 2008, 11:13 AM
Firstname ofcourse :D

Loyalist
Saturday, February 2nd, 2008, 12:34 PM
A "hello" or "hi" followed by my first name usually suffices.

Phlegethon
Saturday, February 2nd, 2008, 01:42 PM
Surname only. I hate being addessed informally by complete strangers. Usually I reply "Did we play in the sandbox together?"

Deary
Saturday, February 2nd, 2008, 03:51 PM
"My name is Captain Kathryn Janeway of the Federation Starship Voyager."

......I've done that once. I don't think they got it.

I'll usually introduce myself with my first name to people my own age and offer my hand to shake. They tend to address me by my first name. To teachers and persons many years older than me, I'll give my first and last name and offer my hand to shake. They tend to address me as Miss (Surname). I think they just like saying my last name :)

ÆinvargR
Saturday, February 2nd, 2008, 03:53 PM
My first name. It doesn't go well with my surname, together they're kind of hard to pronounce, so I don't like that. And changing one's first-name is taboo these days.

In pre-christian times there weren't really any surnames, one's "first" name was once real and only name, but something could be added, like whose son someone is, to clarify who one meant since several people of course could bear the same first name. I hear still in Iceland people are listed by first name.

Talan
Saturday, February 2nd, 2008, 04:24 PM
My first name. It doesn't go well with my surname, together they're kind of hard to pronounce, so I don't like that. And changing one's first-name is taboo these days.

In pre-christian times there weren't really any surnames, one's "first" name was once real and only name, but something could be added, like whose son someone is, to clarify who one meant since several people of course could bear the same first name. I hear still in Iceland people are listed by first name.

It's concerting to see that someone understands my posting this in Germanic Heathenry > Philosophy & Worldview. In Australia, lower-to-middle-class people frequently go by their surname. Pseudonyms are unanimously preferred to a Christian forename, even though these have been bastardised (e.g. John-o is an Australian name meaning Johnathan). This is a visible rejection of "Anglican" conventions which has existed since the 1840s, when the Irish and Jacobins led the Chartist revolution against the Protestant overclass.

EDIT: I was thinking that it's why the anti-heroes of pulp fiction, such as Johnny Bulldog and James Bond, have been so popular here.

Fafner
Saturday, February 2nd, 2008, 04:26 PM
Bond... James Bond :D

It deppends on who I'm talking with. If it's with someone I don't know and is an adult I use "hello" followed by my second name (the one I use most) and my first surname, sometimes both surnames. :)

If it's with someone who is around my same age I use just "hi", "hello" or second name :)

Phlegethon
Saturday, February 2nd, 2008, 04:31 PM
"My name is Captain Kathryn Janeway of the Federation Starship Voyager."

......I've done that once. I don't think they got it.

Try this one next:

"Pippilotta Viktualia Rullgardina Krusmynta Efraimsdotter Långstrump."

;)

Next World
Saturday, February 2nd, 2008, 04:39 PM
I'm not entirely sure of the system I use for introducing myself. It's based off of "vibes". Vibes and the presence of documentation between the party and I. I give my teachers and such my legal name.

Usually, I introduce myself with my religious name or my birth name and give an AKA to my religious name, as it's expected that my religious name will be my legal name within a few years. People who hear my birth name always tell me it is so beautiful and has a nice meaning. They usually realize within a few minutes that my religious name is quite obviously more fitting, even if they don't agree as to why. Even my mother has finally conceded that she gave me the wrong name.

Generally, when I meet someone, I know whether I should give them my first name, first and last name, title and full name, religious name, so on. Like a 20th sense or something.

Strange thing, I think, is that with my birth/legal name I use "Miss", but with my religious name I use "Ms.". I suppose it might having something to do with the context in which I use each name, but it has always been that way.

Fafner
Saturday, February 2nd, 2008, 04:57 PM
^ What is that some of you call "religious name"? :confused: is it something like your nickname? or is it literally religious? We don't have that here, that's why I ask. :)

GroeneWolf
Saturday, February 2nd, 2008, 05:06 PM
I introduce me with my first name and/or familyname. If the last I emphasize a part of that name in a more aristocratic sounding way.

I tend to glare at people and ask why they have the audacity to address me without bowing.

And before I forget, staring those who think I should bow before them on their knees ;) .

Next World
Saturday, February 2nd, 2008, 05:16 PM
^ What is that some of you call "religious name"? :confused: is it something like your nickname? or is it literally religious? We don't have that here, that's why I ask. :)

A lot of Christians have names that are part of religious rituals. It used to be that children were named after saints, now they just take on the name of saints during certain rights of passage as part of their name, but it usually doesn't replace their first names.

There are also people who believe that God/the Universe has all ready named everybody and the names our parents give us may or may not be right. There are many ideas about how people go about realizing their Universal names and such, how the learn to spell them, so on.

I'm part of the latter group, but I think the original post speaking of "religious names" was more directed toward the former.

Mrs. Lyfing
Saturday, February 2nd, 2008, 05:24 PM
I'm a newly wed so I am new at introducing myself as Mrs. Lyfing (example),when we order pizza & on the box it says ya know "Mrs. Lyfing" we still say to each other "is that your name now?" "is that my name now?" with a smile of coarse. :) & getting mail with my married name is exciting too.

So,to introduce myself I would usually say Hey how are you doing & give them my first or first & last name,depending who it is. :) I also say nice to meet you usually.

ladybright
Saturday, February 2nd, 2008, 05:36 PM
Generally I use my fisrt name and surname. For business I use Mrs. Surname. When a friend introduces me to another friend they usually just use my first name. I like my middle name but I do not use it for introductions.

With friends and casual aquaintences I use first names. I like using last names but most people my age or younger seem put off by the fomality. I try to keep things formal as the most formal person perfers. My friends are informal and do not use their (educational) titles socially. I think that first and last is generally best socially.

I do not like people I have not been introduced to calling me by first name only. I am paraphrasing Wilde.
Sir, your manner is familiar but you are not.

I was tickled when my son recieved a book that was addressed to Master Carl Surname.

Next World
Saturday, February 2nd, 2008, 05:46 PM
I was tickled when my son recieved a book that was addressed to Master Carl Surname.I wish folks would go back to using Master regularly. I like it.

I suppose I can use it, even if other people don't. :cool:

Phlegethon
Saturday, February 2nd, 2008, 05:48 PM
^ What is that some of you call "religious name"? :confused: is it something like your nickname? or is it literally religious? We don't have that here, that's why I ask. :)

Sure, I have one too. Counterpope Phleg I., defensor fidei, dux, pontifex et archaeopterix.

The Lawspeaker
Saturday, February 2nd, 2008, 06:35 PM
I tend to give my full name (as is the custom here)

Beornulf
Saturday, February 2nd, 2008, 08:55 PM
It's concerting to see that someone understands my posting this in Germanic Heathenry > Philosophy & Worldview. In Australia, lower-to-middle-class people frequently go by their surname. Pseudonyms are unanimously preferred to a Christian forename, even though these have been bastardised (e.g. John-o is an Australian name meaning Johnathan). This is a visible rejection of "Anglican" conventions which has existed since the 1840s, when the Irish and Jacobins led the Chartist revolution against the Protestant overclass.

EDIT: I was thinking that it's why the anti-heroes of pulp fiction, such as Johnny Bulldog and James Bond, have been so popular here.

When I lived in Australia I was generally referred to by a slang version of my last name.

Dr. Solar Wolff
Sunday, February 3rd, 2008, 02:32 AM
Sure, I have one too. Counterpope Phleg I., defensor fidei, dux, pontifex et archaeopterix.


I thought archaeopterix was a fossil bird?

Of course it matters on the context of the introduction. Informally, just a first name. In business, a handshake and two names. There is no escaping this in business although I hate it. Usually, I don't introduce myself unless absolutely necessary and then with a first name or nickname. Giving out too much information to a stranger is not good. It takes me years to get to know someone and I am not in a hurry.

Eccardus Teutonicus
Friday, March 28th, 2008, 07:27 PM
I typically just use the name that was given to me by my parents. The name one is given at birth has a special meaning, no matter what it is, if it is specifically thought about and chosen by one's parents. I was given my name before my parents had me baptised so I do not consider it my "Christian" name.

Phlegethon
Friday, March 28th, 2008, 07:39 PM
Usually I use: "My name is legion. Down to your knees, earthling!"

Octothorpe
Wednesday, June 25th, 2008, 02:15 PM
I give my full name.

I liked in the old days how men would call each other by their surnames. And would only call their close friends and family by their forenames. Just more respectful.

Conversely, someone you know very well you often refer to just by their surname, at least in England this exists, deriving from school days when our teachers would yell out our surname in class.

In the military, this is called "the naked patronymic," a term I find endlessly amusing. It also helps that everyone's family name is clearly printed on their BDUs (hey, that shows how long ago I served!) ;)

Kriegersohn
Thursday, June 26th, 2008, 07:27 PM
I don't like psuedonyms personally and find little use in "religious names". Other than that it depends on the situation. A handshake and my first name do just fine in most situations. Of course with my given birth name being Ragnar I usually get asked somewhere along the line by someone in Heathen circles what my "real" name is...maybe I should just staple my birth certificate to my forehead? ;) Hence my dislike for psuedonyms.... :)

FFF
Ragnar

KWulf
Friday, February 19th, 2010, 03:07 PM
I use my first name Karl, because if i introduce myself with my surname (Mr Wulf) i imagine some people would be tempted to say: "What's the time, Mr Wolf?':thumbdown

Grimsteinr
Saturday, February 20th, 2010, 12:16 PM
I generally introduce myself with both first and last names
Hel, I'm 70 years old, or will be Friday.
I'm old enough to do it anyway I want to. Don't you think?
There are some young folks who address me with respect.

OTOH, there are quite a few Folks who know me in the US Asatru
Community, who know me by my Religious Name, as well.
They generally call me by that, or my first name.

Tannhauser
Friday, September 17th, 2010, 12:27 AM
Stand up straight, shoulders back, head high, offer my hand for a good, manly handshake and give my name - first and surname. In a blott I give my first name and son of - my father's name.