PDA

View Full Version : Ron Paul Campaign Donations Rise


Deary
Saturday, September 29th, 2007, 06:56 PM
It's a little late for this, but if you've visited Ron Paul's campaign website (http://www.ronpaul2008.com/), you're already aware of the fact that an enormous goal has been set for this week. Previously, aims were to raise $500,000 before September 30th. A few days ago, it was at $100,000 and by evening that day, it was already over $290,000. Now the goal has been changed to $1,000,000. Currently, the donation amount stands at $856,725.12 and is rising by the hundreds as I type.

When I first heard of the goal, I scoffed, but it looks like Dr. Paul and the internet is a decent force to be reckoned with.

SwordOfTheVistula
Sunday, September 30th, 2007, 03:32 AM
It's past the 1 million goal now :)


I spent the day campaigning in Manchester NH for Ron Paul, and got many positive responses. Nearly everyone we met is undecided or not paying attention yet to the race, so those polls placing Romney/Thompson/Giuliani/McCain far in front are pure BS.

Deary
Sunday, October 7th, 2007, 03:49 AM
He has $5,300,000 cash on hand, up top with "main" party candidates.

AP article (http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5jd1Fl2xtwI3ahLMkwUCVzU_IkelgD8S20N D00)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Long-shot Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul raised a surprising $5 million during the past three months, capitalizing on his stance as the only anti-war contender in the GOP field.

Paul, a Texas congressman who once ran for president as a Libertarian, also will report having $5.3 million cash on hand, campaign spokesman Jesse Benton said.

The amount places Paul well ahead of all but the Republican front-runners in the race. His fundraising for the quarter almost matches what Sen. John McCain is expected to report. His total is half the amount that former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney is reported to have raised.

But Paul barely registers in polls of Republican voters, a sign of low name recognition nationally. Since he entered the campaign, he has operated with little media attention, getting the spotlight only during debates. But that has been enough to attract an avid Internet following.

Benton said most of Paul's money has come from online contributions. He said the influx of contributions had placed a strain on the relatively small campaign staff, which was trying to keep up with the accounting challenge.

Paul turned some heads at midyear when he reported having $2.3 million cash on hand. Since then, Benton said, the campaign has increased its staffing from 10 to 40 employees. "We're adding employees as we speak," he said.

Paul has been in Congress for 10 years, but also served four terms in the 1970s and 1980s.

He stands out from the current Republican field because of his staunch anti-war stance. At a debate in August, he was asked how he would end the war. "Just come home," he said. "We just marched in. We can just come back. We went in there illegally. We did not declare war. It's lasting way too long. We didn't declare war in Korea or Vietnam. The wars were never really ended. We lose those wars. We're losing this one. We shouldn't be there. We ought to just come home."

He's an iconoclast in his party in other ways, as well. During a debate on issues confronting minorities, he was enthusiastically applauded when he said minorities are unfairly punished in the criminal justice system. And he called for an end to the war on drugs because "it isn't working."

Paul has raised more than $8 million so far this year.

"Here's a guy nobody is paying attention to and he's raising real money," said a stunned Tony Fabrizio, a Republican strategist unaffiliated in the presidential contest. Noting that McCain has emerged as the most vigorous supporter of the current war strategy in Iraq, Fabrizio said: "The strongest pro-war candidate and the strongest anti-war candidate raised the same amount of money.

For kicks. (http://politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com/2007/10/03/pauls-fundraising-shock/)

Dr. Solar Wolff
Sunday, October 7th, 2007, 07:12 AM
The problem with Ron Paul is the same problem Ross Peroit had. The Jews don't like him. Does anybody wonder why? The Jewish media has already marginalized him. The only person who even gives him airtime is Tucker Carlsen. It doesn't matter how much money Ron Paul raises, the media will rossperoit him. In the end, you are going to have to write-in his name on the ballot.

Deary
Sunday, October 7th, 2007, 08:18 AM
Paul's protection of the United States foreign policy through anti-Israel politics is being horribly misrepresented as antisemitism by the media who inaccurately interpret criticisms of the nation-state Israel for criticism of Jews as a religious and ethnic group.

Æmeric
Sunday, October 7th, 2007, 04:19 PM
The problem with Ron Paul is the same problem Ross Peroit had. The Jews don't like him. Does anybody wonder why? The Jewish media has already marginalized him. The only person who even gives him airtime is Tucker Carlsen. It doesn't matter how much money Ron Paul raises, the media will rossperoit him. In the end, you are going to have to write-in his name on the ballot.
In 1992 most people were not wired to the internet. The Jews still controlled the flow of information through their ownership of most media conglomerates, & via their domination of the credit markets. Even gentile owned companies need a line of credit to function, just ask Ted Turner.

In 2007, Jews are losing their grip on the flow of information. The internet is why Paul is doing so well, in getting his messsage out & in raising money. Theoretically, Paul has a chance to get the Republican nomination. But in reality, if he starts to come close to securing the nomination, he will be assassinated by a mentally disturbed person acting alone.

Next World
Sunday, October 7th, 2007, 05:17 PM
The problem with Ron Paul is the same problem Ross Peroit had. The Jews don't like him. Does anybody wonder why? The Jewish media has already marginalized him. The only person who even gives him airtime is Tucker Carlsen. It doesn't matter how much money Ron Paul raises, the media will rossperoit him. In the end, you are going to have to write-in his name on the ballot.Well, Ross Perot did wind up starting his own party. They aren't very well staffed or known, but they're still there. The problem is that people who would be inclined toward the Reform Party are usually too stupid to put on a suit (rather than a "uniform"), or have no faith in the government as a whole. I've been working with the Reform Party for a while, even though when I run for office I'm going to be using the Republican Party to get on the ballot, more likely than not.

I have faith in Ron Paul's campaign, even though he does have a little more butthead support than is healthy for a politician. If everybody could decide to back him in an intelligible way, it wouldn't matter that the mainstream is cutting him down. We have the ability to hit the fringe all over the Nation, and we can thoroughly compete with the mainstream, in that way.

SwordOfTheVistula
Monday, October 8th, 2007, 08:31 AM
Yeah, I think Ron Paul has 2 advantages over Ross Perot in addition to the internet:

Ross Perot was a total political newcomer, whereas Ron Paul has run in 10+ Congressional races, often in the same type of race he is in now (Republican primary against establishment candidates)

Also by running in the Republican primary instead of as a 3rd party candidate, there is about 1/6 of the people voting in that as in a general election, and there is a lot less of the 'voting for the lesser evil'

Charles
Monday, October 29th, 2007, 11:05 AM
I have read that Ron Paul has performed well on Straw Polls, but not so well on telephone polls, which is more precise at gauging his popularity with voters?

Æmeric
Monday, October 29th, 2007, 02:44 PM
Telephone polls involve calling phones attached to landlines. A lot of younger people only have cell phones - they use landlines for their home computer. Paul's support seems to be highest among younger people & persons who are internet savvy. He's having problems among seniors. They're most likely to be home when pollers call, & to have landline phones rather then cellphones. And unfortunately for Paul they vote in very high percentages - they have to protect social security & other entitlements for the elderly.:rolleyes:

Flash Voyager
Monday, October 29th, 2007, 02:55 PM
According to various sources, Ron Paul once provoked controversy because of his comments on race in America, can anyone shed any light on this?

IlluSionSxxx
Monday, October 29th, 2007, 09:11 PM
$ 2,405,350.00 it is now.And it just keeps going up. Too bad this money will all be wasted when the establishment gets their canditate pushed though...

Rassenpapst
Saturday, November 3rd, 2007, 09:54 AM
According to various sources, Ron Paul once provoked controversy because of his comments on race in America, can anyone shed any light on this?



A 1992 newsletter by Republican congressional candidate Ron Paul highlighted portrayals of blacks as criminally inclined and lacking sense about top political issues.

Reporting on gang crime in Los Angeles, Paul commented: "If you have ever been robbed by a black teen-aged male, you know how unbelievably fleet-footed they can be."

Paul, a Surfside obstetrician who won the GOP nomination in the 14th District runoff by defeating incumbent Rep. Greg Laughlin, said Wednesday he opposed racism.

He said his written commentaries about blacks came in the context of "current events and statistical reports of the time."

Paul's Democratic opponent, Charles "Lefty" Morris, said many of Paul's views were "out there on the fringe" and that this fall voters would judge his commentaries.

Morris' campaign distributed selected writings by Paul this week.

Paul, a former congressman and one-time Libertarian presidential nominee, said allegations about his writings amounted to name-calling by the Democrats.

He said he'd produced the newsletter since 1985 and distributes it to an estimated 7,000 to 8,000 subscribers.

Writing in his independent political newsletter in 1992, Paul commented about black men in the nation's capital.

Citing statistics from a 1992 study produced by the National Center on Incarceration and Alternatives, a criminal justice think tank based in Virginia, Paul concluded in his column:

"Given the inefficiencies of what DC laughingly calls the criminal justice system, I think we can safely assume that 95 percent of the black males in that city are semi-criminal or entirely criminal."

"These aren't my figures," Paul said this week. "That is the assumption you can gather from" the report.

He also wrote: "Opinion polls consistently show that only about 5 percent of blacks have sensible political opinions, i.e. support the free market, individual liberty and the end of welfare and affirmative action."

Paul continued that politically sensible blacks are outnumbered "as decent people."

Birka
Wednesday, November 7th, 2007, 06:21 PM
In remembrance of Guy Fawkes day, Nov. 5, the supporters of Ron Paul raised $4.2 million dollars online in one day. The breaks the Republican party record for one day fundraising, and the great thing I love about this feat is that it way done totally independantly of the official Ron Paul campaigne.

This is the real definition of grass roots. Over 36,000 supporters donated an average of $103 in one day. The revolution to save America is looking good.