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Northerner
Monday, February 19th, 2007, 07:33 PM
Panaji, Feb 07: Renowned German Indologist and scientist of religion, Egbert Richter Ushanas today claimed that he has unravelled the mystery of Indus Valley scripts by decoding major seals and tablets found during various archaeological excavations.

"Already 1,000-odd seals are decoded and of them, 300-odd are printed in monography -- the message of Indus seals and tablets," stated Richter, who has also decoded tablets from Easter Island in Pacific Ocean and disc of Phaistos on Island of Crete in Meditarrenean Sea.

"All the seals are based on Vedas -- Rig Veda and Atharva Veda," Richter told a news agency here.

He is here to attend the International Indology Conference, beginning from February 7.

Richter, who began decoding the mysteries behind the seals way back in 1988, feels that after decoding 1,000-odd seals, there is no need to decode the rest.

"You need not eat all apples of world to understand the apple. Few apples are enough," he quipped.

The path-breaking decoding by Richter is based on the Sumerian and Brahmi script wherein he has detected the lost meaning of the seals which can be traced to Vedic era.

A Vedic scholar himself, Richter during the course of unravelling the Indus Valley mysteries, has translated all the important Vedic hymns and is a Sanskrit exponent too.

Source: ZEE News (http://www.zeenews.com/articles.asp?rep=2&aid=352560&sid=FTP)

Northerner
Monday, February 19th, 2007, 07:47 PM
Panaji, Feb 07: Renowned German Indologist and scientist of religion, Egbert Richter Ushanas today claimed that he has unravelled the mystery of Indus Valley scripts by decoding major seals and tablets found during various archaeological excavations.

"Already 1,000-odd seals are decoded and of them, 300-odd are printed in monography -- the message of Indus seals and tablets," stated Richter, who has also decoded tablets from Easter Island in Pacific Ocean and disc of Phaistos on Island of Crete in Meditarrenean Sea.

"All the seals are based on Vedas -- Rig Veda and Atharva Veda," Richter told a news agency here.

He is here to attend the International Indology Conference, beginning from February 7.

Richter, who began decoding the mysteries behind the seals way back in 1988, feels that after decoding 1,000-odd seals, there is no need to decode the rest.

"You need not eat all apples of world to understand the apple. Few apples are enough," he quipped.

The path-breaking decoding by Richter is based on the Sumerian and Brahmi script wherein he has detected the lost meaning of the seals which can be traced to Vedic era.

A Vedic scholar himself, Richter during the course of unravelling the Indus Valley mysteries, has translated all the important Vedic hymns and is a Sanskrit exponent too.

Source: Zee News (http://www.zeenews.com/articles.asp?rep=2&aid=352560&sid=FTP)

Northerner
Monday, February 19th, 2007, 07:56 PM
As regarding the Phaistos disc (mentioned also in the article), I think that I should point out that numerous scholars (and otherwise) have claimed to have deciphered it. So far, however, the majority scholarly opinion is that this remains undeciphered.

Northerner
Monday, February 19th, 2007, 08:00 PM
As regarding the Phaistos disc (mentioned also in the article), I think that I should point out that numerous scholars (and otherwise) have claimed to have deciphered it. So far, however, the majority scholarly opinion is that this remains undeciphered.

Gorm the Old
Monday, February 19th, 2007, 11:34 PM
YES ! Reserve judgement. Such claims are and have been numerous, as were the claims of decipherment of the Egyptian hieroglyphs before the work of Champollion which proved them all to be not only erroneous but preposterous.

About 40 years ago, a noted Italian epigrapher claimed to have found the key to decipherment of Etruscan in the Albanian language. Despite early apparent successes, further application of his method yielded only gibberish.

Epigraphers and philologists generally agree that the Easter Island tablets have NOT been deciphered. Natives who claimed to be able to read them gave entirely different readings of the same tablet on different occasions. They constitute "the epigrapher's mightmare": an unknown language written in an unknown script.

The language of the Indus Valley seals is unknown. Previous attempts at decipherment based on the assumption that the language is Vedic have not been successful. A major part of the problem lies in the extreme brevity of the seal inscriptions.

Even though the Etruscans used a form of the Greek alphabet, and a number of Etruscan words passed into Latin, it remains undeciphered for the same reason. Almost all Etruscan inscriptions say exactly the same thing "X , son (or daughter or wife) of Y [title or office held] died [date]" This gives us less than a dozen words of known meaning.

fonze
Tuesday, February 20th, 2007, 12:37 AM
If the seals and tablets of IVC are based on the Vedas, then that pretty much rules out the possibility of an Aryan invasion (IVC's demise is thought to be the result of Aryan invasions).