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Siebenbürgerin
Saturday, June 21st, 2008, 10:30 AM
Survivalism is a commonly used (and often mis-used) term for the preparedness strategy and subculture of individuals or groups anticipating and making preparations for future possible disruptions in local, regional or worldwide social or political order. Survivalists often prepare for this anticipated disruption by learning skills (e.g., emergency medical training), stockpiling food and water, preparing for self-defense and self-sufficiency, and/or building structures that will help them to survive or "disappear" (e.g., a survival retreat or underground shelter).

The specific preparations made by survivalists depend on the nature of the anticipated disruption(s), some of the most common scenarios being:

1. Natural disaster clusters, and patterns of apocalyptic planetary crises or Earth changes, such as Climate Change bringing on tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes, blizzards, and severe thunderstorms, etc.
2. A disaster brought about by the activities of mankind: chemical spills, release of radioactive materials, war, or an oppressive government.
3. General collapse of society, resulting from the unavailability of electricity, fuel, food, and water.
4. Monetary disruption or Economic collapse, stemming from monetary manipulation, hyper-inflation or world-wide depression.
5. Widespread chaos, or some other unexplained apocalyptic event.

More abut survivalism:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Survivalism

What do you think of it? Is it necessary or paranoia? Are you survivalist or do you know anyone who is?

DanseMacabre
Friday, June 27th, 2008, 07:59 AM
I would consider myself somewhat of a survivalist. I'm not paranoid, I'm prepared. :D

I try to keep extra non-perishable food stocked away, also first aid kits and yes I own several guns. My dream would be to have a cabin designed to be self sufficient and live far away from big cities. I'm not planning on anything in particular happening. But just in case better safe than sorry.

theTasmanian
Friday, June 27th, 2008, 08:50 AM
What do you think of it?
Is it necessary or paranoia?
Are you survivalist or do you know anyone who is?

well i know some who are very paranoid!

but i don't think being prepared is bad as i often follow a saying my father uses

" expect the best! prepare for the worst"

so i have a number of Survival skills but i don't stock food or have a bunker....i would like the bunker:D there's just something fun about them

Lyfing
Friday, June 27th, 2008, 11:51 PM
I reckon I'm some sort of survivalist. The thought brings to mind "when the going gets tough the though get going"

A friend of mine gave me this (http://www.undergroundhousing.com/) book years ago. Be sure to check out the pictures (http://www.undergroundhousing.com/structures.html)...


Cut heating costs 80%
Eliminate air-conditioning costs
Shelter your family from:

* Hurricane
* Tornados
* Earthquakes
* Rampant Fire
* Atomic Fallout
* Mobs, gunfire, blasts, and similar results of social disintegration

Build a home that is:

* Wonderfully affordable
* Easy to build
* In tune with nature
* Solar heatable
* Light, airy, sun and view filled
* Blissfully quiet

Underground housing is a concept whose time has come again. Its advantages over above-ground housing are spectacular. It stays warm in the winter and cool in the summer. It blends in with nature rather than rearing above it. It can double the yard space in a city. To the neighbors it looks like a park. It is the most environmentally sound. It uses half the building materials. It is the safest form of housing: it is fire resistant, radiation resistant and is impervious to tornado and hurricane strength winds. It even does better in earthquakes.

Where are the traditional tornado shelters located? Where are the fallout shelters? Where does an army go to defend itself? In a world that is increasingly hostile, it’s really nice to know that Mother Earth herself is providing your safety.


Later,
-Lyfing

Leonhardt
Saturday, June 28th, 2008, 04:20 AM
I read Frugal Squirrels Survival Forum mostly for the gun information, and the news discussion section. I also sometimes read the survival/disaster preparation section at other gun forums. The discussions can be eye opening, and entertaining to me. Some of the best threads are on South America when the governments somewhat collapsed, and the city survival. I now have some water filters, and would like to get a book on wild plants to eat. Just remembered that I still need a first aid kit.

There is a curse of "May you live in interesting times." They are nice to read about, but you do not want to live in them.

flemish
Thursday, July 24th, 2008, 03:47 PM
I went into a book store a few weeks ago, and was amazed at the absence of books on how to survive a nuclear attack. There were books on survivalism, but none even addressed how to protect oneself from radiation poisoning(potassium iodide tablets), or how to build a bomb shelter. After I left the store I immediately went home and purchased a book online entitled,Nuclear War Survival Skills by Cresson H. Kearny. Some of the terms in the book were difficult for me to understand, but I was able to glean some pretty useful information from it. For instance, if you don't have a basement, seek shelter in the basement of school building or church. Also, always have face masks around to protect yourself from radioactive dust in the air.
It's believed the next major attack on the West by Islamic extremists will be nuclear, so again, it just amazes me that there is nothing in book stores on surviving such an event.
Here in the U.S., we have a southern border which is, for the most part, unpatrolled, and millions of people cross over it into the U.S. every year. According to American Border Patrol officers, thirty percent of the people who are caught crossing aren't even Latin American. Some people from the Middle East are caught trying to get in. Also, according to recent news reports, Al-Qaeda is training blond, blue eyed men in it's camps in Afghanistan as potential terrorists. These people could easily blend into any crowd in the West, according to the CIA.
Yes, survivalism, particularly nuclear survivalism, is something more people need to familiarize themselves with.

Octothorpe
Friday, August 8th, 2008, 02:42 PM
If you need data on nuclear survival, please check out the government documents section of your nearest university library. So long as it is an official repository of federal documents, it will have the old citizen's handbooks on surviving a nuclear attack. I've used them with my history classes before--many of the clip-art stye illustrations, albeit informative, are unintentionally hilarious (moms in heels and pearls, serving Kool-Aid during a nuclear attack whilst in the family shelter . . .).

Thrymheim
Friday, August 8th, 2008, 03:21 PM
I wouldn't say that I prepare as such, but I know which plants can be eaten, how to catch game, and fish without any equipment. I know how to preserve this food and how to cure skins, and I have knowledge of medicinal herbs, although I would need someone to diagnose what the problem was first :) I also on a longer term basis know how to make and shoot a longbow. I've won medals for shooting and have been hunting with a rifle on more than one occasion so I reckon that it wouldn't be too difficult to survive. My biggest problem would be other people.

ChaosLord
Saturday, September 27th, 2008, 08:26 AM
I didn't know where to put this thread at so I thought that the lounge would be convenient. I haven't come across any threads about survivalism and since countries are slowly collapsing from within and the looming possibilities of wars breaking out (civil or international) I thought I'd share these tips with you all. Here's some survivalist info;

http://www.survivalist.info/
http://www.textfiles.com/survival/
http://www.survivalblog.com/

Survivalism for nuclear conflicts (prior, during, and after);

http://www.ki4u.com/
http://www.radshelters4u.com/
http://www.nukepills.com/
http://www.oism.org/nwss/

Maelstrom
Saturday, September 27th, 2008, 08:56 AM
I've read some things about "Survive Club", an organisation of sorts formed by the ex-leader of the New Zealand National Front.

In my opinion it all seems a little silly and appears to just be a bunch of people running around in the woods with paintball guns :-O

Personally I see the whole Survivalism thing a bit defeatist in outlook:

"Oooh, let's just wait for this enevitable apocalyptic situation!"

....

"Okay, well that didn't happen... But... But... We're still prepared!"

The NZ Survivalists that I've conversed with over the internet seem to uphold the belief that society's gone wrong, it's all going to be destroyed sometime soon and if we all form a little group of people all of our problems are going to be solved.

I won't attempt to down-play their preparedness. Being physically fit, knowing a martial art and simple common sense will get you a lot further than training with a paintball gun will (at least in a place where there are not many guns, like New Zealand).

CrystalRose
Saturday, September 27th, 2008, 09:06 AM
I don't know, I think I would rather be safe than sorry. Information worth retaining. :D

ChaosLord
Saturday, September 27th, 2008, 09:09 AM
The information was more to educate than make someone a paranoid person awaiting the apocalypse. It's to give people an idea of what is needed in dire circumstances instead of being in the dark of things.

Rainraven
Saturday, September 27th, 2008, 09:40 AM
Definately a good mindset to have but I lack the preparation to be like that. But they'd definately be a useful sort of person to have in a disaster!

Ulf
Saturday, September 27th, 2008, 10:04 AM
I wish there was a survivalist subforum...

http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?p=854271
http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?p=855047
http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?t=77639

10 Day Survival Pack for your vehicle (http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles2/yago104.html)

When the next world-crushing disaster strikes — tsunami, quake, dirty bomb, whatever — one thing is certain: You're on your own. As hurricanes Katrina and Rita showed, help may not arrive for 72 hours. Don't fret. Wired has your back with these shopping lists for your DIY emergency kit. Because when everything goes to hell, you'll want gear that gives you an evolutionary advantage over your less-prepared neighbors. Clip and save; lock and load.

The House Kit

Store all this gear in a sealed plastic trash can or containers. It won't cost as much as you think: You probably own most of this stuff already.

A. First aid You could buy the $25 kit from Red Cross. Or you could build your own: bandages, alcohol, cotton balls, antidiarrheals, anti-inflammatories like ibuprofen, and prescription meds.

B. Clothes A full change, including warm outer layers (wool or synthetic) and sturdy shoes, for each person under your roof.

C. Plastic sheeting Fiber-reinforced, laminated polyethylene film, 0.006 inches* thick. You can buy 1,200 square feet of Dura Skrim DS2 for about $100. Or get a tarp — for covering broken windows, roofs.

D. Zip ties Handy when you have to make splints, compression bandages, or tourniquets.

E. Water A gallon per person, per day. For a family of four, that's 12 gallons. If you have the space for that, great. If not, keep as much as you can manage. Have unscented bleach on hand, too — 16 drops in a gallon and you've got potable H20. Tea bags make it taste OK.

F. Food Raid the pantry: dehydrated soups, canned tuna and veggies, nuts and candy. Peanut butter is high-calorie and has a long shelf life. You can also buy freeze-dried camping meals.

G. Flashlight We like the Inova X5 — it's water-resistant, aircraft-grade anodized aluminum and uses LEDs. But a cheap drugstore version and some batteries will do just fine.

H. Protective wear Waterproof and cut-resistant Kevlar gloves and N95 face masks.

I. Tools A crowbar to pry debris that might stand between you and a loved one. An adjustable wrench. Screwdrivers. A staple gun. Rope.

J. Matches You're probably not a Boy Scout. Get the kind marked waterproof and windproof and store 'em in a ziplock bag. In another bag, hoard some dryer lint for kindling.

The Go Pack

Keep these items in a backpack that's readily accessible — you know, in case you have to bail at a moment's notice. One bag per person.

K. Radio A cheap transistor set with batteries is fine. Or you could get something that'll pick up TV and NOAA bands and that has a hand crank, like the Eton Grundig FR300 — it comes with a cell phone charging jack and built-in flashlight. If you want to splurge, see page 95.

L. Cash $500 in small bills. ATMs won't work when the power is out, and neither will credit card readers.

M. Documents A copy of your home insurance policy, plus contact numbers, medical insurance card, passport, driver's license, bank records, and photos of family members. (A local map and spare keys may come in handy, too.)

N. Mylar space blanket It's a super-compact means of both keeping warm and reflecting heatstroke-causing rays of sun.

O. Clothes Put spares in a waterproof bag. Remember a hat. Toss in a few basic toiletries, too, like a toothbrush and toilet paper.

P. Food Make room for sports nutrition or candy bars. Nuts and trail mix are good options, too. Include a bottle of water.

Q. Essential medicines Whatever you've been prescribed, plus sunblock and ibuprofen or acetaminophen.

R. Duct tape Well, duh.

S. Signal devices Roadside flares will do. Or you could get Greatland Laser's Rescue Laser Flare — two AA batteries and you have 72 hours of 20-mile-visible brightness. Also try the Fox 40 whistle (115 dB!).

T. Multitool Whether you come down on the Swiss Army side or the Leatherman side of the greatest debate of our time, just have one with you. Make sure it has a can opener, a good knife blade, and both Phillips and flat-head screwdrivers.

The Smarter Emergency Kit (http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/15.05/st_emergency.html)

Lyfing
Saturday, September 27th, 2008, 11:46 PM
There was another thread similar to this at one time..anyhow..

A friend of mine gave me a book called The $50 And Up Underground House Book..his ideas on underground green-houses are very nice..


Cut heating costs 80%
Eliminate air-conditioning costs
Shelter your family from:

* Hurricane
* Tornados
* Earthquakes
* Rampant Fire
* Atomic Fallout
* Mobs, gunfire, blasts, and similar results of social disintegration

Build a home that is:

* Wonderfully affordable
* Easy to build
* In tune with nature
* Solar heatable
* Light, airy, sun and view filled
* Blissfully quiet

Underground housing is a concept whose time has come again. Its advantages over above-ground housing are spectacular. It stays warm in the winter and cool in the summer. It blends in with nature rather than rearing above it. It can double the yard space in a city. To the neighbors it looks like a park. It is the most environmentally sound. It uses half the building materials. It is the safest form of housing: it is fire resistant, radiation resistant and is impervious to tornado and hurricane strength winds. It even does better in earthquakes.

Where are the traditional tornado shelters located? Where are the fallout shelters? Where does an army go to defend itself? In a world that is increasingly hostile, it’s really nice to know that Mother Earth herself is providing your safety.

http://www.undergroundhousing.com/

Maybe I watched to many post-apocalyptic movies as a boy in the 80's, but the idea still stirs in me the thought of starting from scratch..it's just now called Ragnarok.

Later,
-Lyfing

rainman
Tuesday, October 7th, 2008, 09:12 PM
I want to make a community doing something like this. Join me people!

Here's some obvious books:

This is a good book on how to grow your own food, butcher a pig, brew your own beer etc.

http://www.amazon.com/Self-sufficient-Life-How-Live/dp/0789493322/ref=pd_bbs_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1223410270&sr=8-3

Cythraul
Tuesday, October 7th, 2008, 09:45 PM
Americans seem to be much more 'up' on Survivalism than Europeans I've noticed. I suppose it's because guns are alien to most of us Brits and we (wrongly, probably) feel secure that our old country is unshakeable.

However, I truly believe that dangerous times like closely ahead. We're overdue for something and I've been following the swell of global tension closely. An awful lot of people believe that martial law is just around the corner in the U.S. - and in my opinion it should be considering how well confirmed we've just had it that our Governments don't care what we think (and how undeniably unconstitutional the U.S. Government is) with the bailouts. People should be damn MAD and as soon as it starts showing, they'll march the troops right out.

So thanks for all the links and info. I'm going to start preparing (more than I already have been).

rainman
Wednesday, October 8th, 2008, 03:46 AM
the guy who wrote that book is English and now currently lives in Ireland completley off the grid. He gives people instruction on how to do it themselves so you can go visit him. But I'd rather have you come to America and help me upstart a community off the grid!

TheGreatest
Thursday, October 9th, 2008, 09:39 AM
There was another thread similar to this at one time..anyhow..

A friend of mine gave me a book called The $50 And Up Underground House Book..his ideas on underground green-houses are very nice..



Maybe I watched to many post-apocalyptic movies as a boy in the 80's, but the idea still stirs in me the thought of starting from scratch..it's just now called Ragnarok.

Later,
-Lyfing


Wouldn't this be extremely expensive and take a long time to build? And I would be surprised if a city by-law actually allowed someone to build a home under the terrain.


Might be possible in the countryside tho...

Beornulf
Thursday, October 9th, 2008, 10:24 AM
Personally I see the whole Survivalism thing a bit defeatist in outlook:

"Oooh, let's just wait for this enevitable apocalyptic situation!"


You must find my world view a little defeatist too, perhaps also all Indo-European religions too. Sooner or later the snake is going to poison itself, it's up to us as to whether we survive the fallout. Natural disasters occur everywhere might I add.


The NZ Survivalists that I've conversed with over the internet seem to uphold the belief that society's gone wrong

You disagree with this? I can certainly agree that society has gone wrong and would further say that it hasn't been right for over a thousand years.


I won't attempt to down-play their preparedness. Being physically fit, knowing a martial art and simple common sense will get you a lot further than training with a paintball gun will (at least in a place where there are not many guns, like New Zealand).

All practical training helps, I'm pretty sure the army wouldn't play out battle scenarios with live bullets.

Considering the general mental state of most people today I’d rather ensure that I’m able to defend myself and those few close to me if anything goes wrong rather than wait for the handout and starve.

Oresai
Friday, October 10th, 2008, 12:25 PM
I was raised in a poaching family in Scotland. Most of the skills I learned could, I suppose, come under Survivalism since they taught us to rely on our own resources and skills rather than that of others or manufacture.
So I learned to light fires from scratch as it was our only means of heat and at one point, cooking. Even today living in Orkney, I run a stove, an old Doric, which uses solid fuel, and often cook on and in it.
I can light a fire from the flint and steel kit I have.
I can track and trap meat, skin, butcher and cook it. I can also tan the hides and use them if needed.
I usually grow my own vegetables and keep goats, and poultry, for meat and eggs. I count myself lucky enough to live in an area where old fashioned and traditional country skills still remain and this teaches a self reliance that is also necessary because of geographic isolation....this is a small island and often adverse weather cuts us off from mainland so we learn to be pretty self sufficient.
The only guns I have are air rifles, though I do own crossbows and archery bows and an assortment of weapons, most for reenactment or just because I like them. :) (My favourite being a Celtic leaf bladed sword)
I see a lot of people on mainland who are `losing` fairly traditional and basic skills, even to the extent of simple home cookery! It isn`t taught in many schools anymore and neither are other homemaking arts, which I think is a shame.
But hey, I`m old enough to be able to say that! :P
Y`know...? "Well, in my day, young un...ahem..." :D
There have been a few winters, harsh and bitter, where through lack of money and being cut off from outside help, I`ve had no choice but to rely on what I can do or what I had in stock to get by.
Caught unawares at one point, I went almost a week with barely a mouthful of food, my own stupid fault and a sharp taught lesson I never forgot.
But have to say, the older I get, the more I`d kill for some decent central heating sometimes.....;)

Aemma
Friday, October 10th, 2008, 02:19 PM
I was raised in a poaching family in Scotland. Most of the skills I learned could, I suppose, come under Survivalism since they taught us to rely on our own resources and skills rather than that of others or manufacture.
So I learned to light fires from scratch as it was our only means of heat and at one point, cooking. Even today living in Orkney, I run a stove, an old Doric, which uses solid fuel, and often cook on and in it.
I can light a fire from the flint and steel kit I have.
I can track and trap meat, skin, butcher and cook it. I can also tan the hides and use them if needed.
I usually grow my own vegetables and keep goats, and poultry, for meat and eggs. I count myself lucky enough to live in an area where old fashioned and traditional country skills still remain and this teaches a self reliance that is also necessary because of geographic isolation....this is a small island and often adverse weather cuts us off from mainland so we learn to be pretty self sufficient.
The only guns I have are air rifles, though I do own crossbows and archery bows and an assortment of weapons, most for reenactment or just because I like them. :) (My favourite being a Celtic leaf bladed sword)
I see a lot of people on mainland who are `losing` fairly traditional and basic skills, even to the extent of simple home cookery! It isn`t taught in many schools anymore and neither are other homemaking arts, which I think is a shame.
But hey, I`m old enough to be able to say that! :P
Y`know...? "Well, in my day, young un...ahem..." :D
There have been a few winters, harsh and bitter, where through lack of money and being cut off from outside help, I`ve had no choice but to rely on what I can do or what I had in stock to get by.
Caught unawares at one point, I went almost a week with barely a mouthful of food, my own stupid fault and a sharp taught lesson I never forgot.
But have to say, the older I get, the more I`d kill for some decent central heating sometimes.....;)

You're fortunate to have learned all of those skills (or I should rather say, to have *had* to learn these skills), Oresai. And I couldn't agree more with the notion that basic skills aren't being taught enough in our schools these days. It's the same here in Canada. Kids aren't being taught any of the daily life skills that we were once taught by taking courses such as Home Ec. or Woodworking or such. I see so many men and women of my own generation (tail-end babyboomer) that don't know how to be handymen, work with basic tools, build a basic anything with lumber and nails, and don't know how to cook, or sew or knit, or preserve food. We've come to rely far too heavily on the availability of prepared items and have lost the art, craft and science of just making it ourselves. A sure recipe for disaster I think.

Great reading about your lifestyle up in the Orkneys, Oresai. Thanks!

Frith...Aemma

Siebenbürgerin
Thursday, May 28th, 2009, 01:49 PM
I've been watching Ultimate Survival on Discovery Channel, a British reality television series in which survival expert Bear Grylls demonstrates and narrates techniques for wilderness survival in regions around the globe. That's survival taken to the extreme.
I've to say it got me to become a little bit more survivalist. I've to have at least a bottle of water, flashlight, batteries and knife in the kitchen.

Hemerik
Thursday, January 28th, 2010, 01:27 AM
In addition to stocking food, tools and cash, it may also be prudent to keep some gold and silver coins on hand, just in case your regular currency crashes and becomes worthless.

OnePercent
Thursday, January 28th, 2010, 03:32 AM
It is interesting to note the different responses on this forum between Americans and people living in other countries. Americans seem alot more informed on the topic. I think this is a result of our living conditions here in the U.S. First, most Americans are keenly aware that our government is corrupt and self-serving and therefore will be conspicuously absent in the aftermath of a collapse, leaving us with little choice but to look to our own defenses. Secondly, the significant ethnic diversity we are plagued with in this country can only have bad implications in the aftermath of a disaster.

Hemerik
Thursday, January 28th, 2010, 11:11 AM
I'm afraid you are quite right. Especially Northwestern Europeans still have a lot of faith in their governments and heavily depend on them to solve their problems for them. Not just because they're stupid; the governments strongly encourage this sort of behavior. I wouldn't say that we have a lack of ethnic diversity here, though, especially in the cities. You might think that in a way it is even worse here, because all the immigration stems from a much more recent date. At least black Americans are still Americans, more than a lot of Dutch Muslims are Dutch. Furthermore, the US in general is a lot less crowded than it is over here. You still have wild places that invite people to practice survival skills. You still have small farmers around that have some experience with these things. You can have something like homesteaders, for which there would be no place here, anymore. The only farms left in our part of the world are large meat or milk factories. But to get back to your point: I think it is true that because people here trust the government too much, it just doesn't cross their minds that they might need to prepare to save themselves.

Valbiorn
Sunday, January 31st, 2010, 10:12 PM
Oresai,
central heat? all we've had for the last 35 years is wood stoves. Yes, we have electric, but only wood heat. I've got enough wheat, oats, rice and barley to last us over a year, and weapons for self defense and hunting. No, I'm not a nut, this is how our ancestors (as you know) survived. It really makes me sad when I buy veggies and the young clerk doesn't even know what they are!!

Our western civilization is a house of cards, waiting to fall...

Ragnar Lodbrok
Sunday, January 31st, 2010, 11:43 PM
I've been watching Ultimate Survival on Discovery Channel, a British reality television series in which survival expert Bear Grylls demonstrates and narrates techniques for wilderness survival in regions around the globe. That's survival taken to the extreme.
I've to say it got me to become a little bit more survivalist. I've to have at least a bottle of water, flashlight, batteries and knife in the kitchen.

That could be the only one thing worth watching nowadays...the closest I've been to surviving out in the wilderness has been hiking and jogging out in the cold winter nature trails, when its late. This afternoon I was performing sports magick out there, I called on the nature sprites to help me channel the energy I was exerting into the latest projects I'm focused on.

SpearBrave
Monday, February 1st, 2010, 02:39 AM
I don't know if I would call myself a survivalist, but we produce about sixty to seventy five percent of our own food. I think we do this more because we like to do it and health reasons. We increase this amount every year. Preserving food by canning in Mason jars is a good time for us, it is hard work but something we do it together.:)

We do have guns for hunting and defense and reloading equipment. There again I like to hunt and own weapons.

There is a whole series of books I would recommend is the Fox Fire Books. These books started out as a High School project to record and preserve the lifestyles of the Appalachian Mountains. In these books it tells you how to do about everything you need to know from raising and preserving your own food, to home remedies , to making your own iron. There are also chapters on making moonshine, firearms, house building, animal husbandry, making your own shoes, and other affairs of plain and simple living. Warning these books can be hard to read as some chapters are written in Appalachian dialect.

Here is the site:

http://www.foxfire.org/thefoxfirebookseries.aspx

you might find them online if you search The Foxfire Books.

OutlawsnUnderdogs
Tuesday, September 27th, 2011, 09:19 PM
I am a member of a survivalist forum, I quite enjoy it, you might check it out.

http://www.survivalistboards.com

Hope to see you there, a lot of good info there, and a lot of good ideas, by far the best forum I have ever found.

Nebelwerfer
Monday, January 23rd, 2012, 10:07 PM
If the shelves empty for any reason you have about 21 days of survivability. Its not paranoia to stockpile food and other items for such a contigency.

Getting water is easier as long as you have purification chemicals.

Hersir
Monday, January 23rd, 2012, 10:12 PM
If the shelves empty for any reason you have about 21 days of survivability. Its not paranoia to stockpile food and other items for such a contigency.

Getting water is easier as long as you have purification chemicals.

I guess we are lucky with the water here in Norway, we usually only have to boil it.

Nebelwerfer
Monday, January 23rd, 2012, 10:23 PM
At least Norway doesn't have a shortage of trees. If you have a population of 60 million on a small island, lack of fuel becomes a problem when the laws of reality start seeping in.

ChaosLord
Tuesday, January 24th, 2012, 12:21 AM
You and I both... :thumbup


I am a member of a survivalist forum, I quite enjoy it, you might check it out.

http://www.survivalistboards.com

Hope to see you there, a lot of good info there, and a lot of good ideas, by far the best forum I have ever found.

Angelcynn Beorn
Monday, January 30th, 2012, 02:42 AM
At least Norway doesn't have a shortage of trees. If you have a population of 60 million on a small island, lack of fuel becomes a problem when the laws of reality start seeping in.

I think if the lights go down in Europe, then we in Britain will have to start worrying about starving long before we run out of things to burn for heat.