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Dagna
Thursday, May 22nd, 2008, 12:04 AM
'Nationalism' in the Nordics

A recent caption in the Dagens Nyheter newspaper causes David Bartal to ask what effect cultural diversity has on national pride.

I almost choked on my toast on Saturday morning when I read the caption below a photo of a dark-skinned child in a shawl beating on a drum on the front page of Dagens Nyheter newspaper. Regardless of the intention of the editors, the photo caption could be interpreted as xenophobic, or even racist. That is not a good thing.

The headline below the photo of what appeared to be a Muslim child predicts "A toned-down nationalism when Norway celebrates its National Day."

The caption went on to explain that Maymona, the 12-year-old in the photo, "will beat on her drum in front of the Royal Palace today in Oslo on the National Day, May 17. She is proof that nationalism has been toned down in Norway in recent years. Upwards of a third of the children in the "children's parade" are the children of immigrants."

But why should the participation of children with a different ethnic background somehow "tone down" Norwegian nationalism? Does Maymona represent a threat to Nordic purity? I can't imagine that this was what the editors of DN meant to suggest.

In fact, the article linked to the front page photo and caption conveys a nearly opposite message. It suggests that the enthusiastic participation of large numbers of immigrants in national day celebrations is viewed by many Norwegians as a positive change.

More information (http://www.thelocal.se/11844/20080518/)

Do you believe foreigners should have the right to fly the national flag of another country?

Angelcynn Beorn
Thursday, May 22nd, 2008, 12:17 AM
I don't think first generation immigrants should be granted the same rights of citizenship as full blooded natives. It's one of the many weaknesses of democracy.

It really struck home to me the other week when i was voting in the London elections, how immigrants have destroyed the entire rationale for democracy. I was stuck between a Polish girl (who almost certainly didn't even have British citizenship) and an Indian (who could barely speak a word of English) who were both voting that day as well. If either one of them voted against my choice, it effectively neutralises the point in me voting anyway, and i was the only Englander there.

Elysium
Thursday, May 22nd, 2008, 12:18 AM
'Nationalism' in the Nordics

A recent caption in the Dagens Nyheter newspaper causes David Bartal to ask what effect cultural diversity has on national pride.

I almost choked on my toast on Saturday morning when I read the caption below a photo of a dark-skinned child in a shawl beating on a drum on the front page of Dagens Nyheter newspaper. Regardless of the intention of the editors, the photo caption could be interpreted as xenophobic, or even racist. That is not a good thing.

The headline below the photo of what appeared to be a Muslim child predicts "A toned-down nationalism when Norway celebrates its National Day."

The caption went on to explain that Maymona, the 12-year-old in the photo, "will beat on her drum in front of the Royal Palace today in Oslo on the National Day, May 17. She is proof that nationalism has been toned down in Norway in recent years. Upwards of a third of the children in the "children's parade" are the children of immigrants."

But why should the participation of children with a different ethnic background somehow "tone down" Norwegian nationalism? Does Maymona represent a threat to Nordic purity? I can't imagine that this was what the editors of DN meant to suggest.

In fact, the article linked to the front page photo and caption conveys a nearly opposite message. It suggests that the enthusiastic participation of large numbers of immigrants in national day celebrations is viewed by many Norwegians as a positive change.

More information (http://www.thelocal.se/11844/20080518/)

Do you believe foreigners should have the right to fly the national flag of another country?

Yes, they should. However, they should not be there in the first place.

Thrymheim
Thursday, May 22nd, 2008, 12:43 AM
If you wish to live in a different country from that of your birth, then yes you should have patriotic feeling for that country, I will certainly try to do so when I emigrate.

Dagna
Thursday, May 22nd, 2008, 04:59 AM
If you wish to live in a different country from that of your birth, then yes you should have patriotic feeling for that country, I will certainly try to do so when I emigrate.
Isn't that integration? Muslims who fly Norwegian flags call it their country. By flying the Norwegian flag and calling it their country, they basically send the message that they have the right to be there.

Thrymheim
Thursday, May 22nd, 2008, 10:10 AM
If you are going to have foreigners in your country then surely it is better to have ones who wish to become part of that country than those who wish to fly their own flag? Interestingly enough nobody in my country has the right to fly their flag. :( So to be short about it yes everybody should have the right to fly their countries flag. Since nobody is going to send them home one might as well try to integrate them into the existing community as much as possible rather than having their culture take over.

Angelcynn Beorn
Thursday, May 22nd, 2008, 12:16 PM
If no-one is going to send them home, then Norwegian culture is dead in the long run anyway. The flag flying is a mere sideshow to that fact.

Bärin
Thursday, May 22nd, 2008, 12:29 PM
One thing is for sure, in my opinion they shouldn't be allowed to fly their own flags. If they want to come to Europe, they should adapt and integrate at all costs. We don't do that now, we try to accomodate them and this is a mistake because in the long run it will turn into the muslimification of our countries. If we give them an all or nothing integration stance, they will be less tempted to come to Europe.

Bridie
Friday, June 20th, 2008, 02:18 PM
Do you believe foreigners should have the right to fly the national flag of another country?
No. If it is not their nation, then to fly that nation's flag as if it were their own is an insult as it could be interpreted as an advocation of the destruction of that nation's ethnic, cultural and racial uniqueness and history.

In other words, a foreigner flying the flag of your nation as if it were his own could be seen as an act of disrespect and disregard for your people's unique ethnic identity.



If they want to come to Europe, they should adapt and integrate at all costs. We don't do that now, we try to accomodate them and this is a mistake because in the long run it will turn into the muslimification of our countries. If we give them an all or nothing integration stance, they will be less tempted to come to Europe.
Assimilation is a more destructive force than multiculturalism (where the multiple ethnic/cultural groups retain their own identity and thereby respect the rights of other groups to retain theirs). And that's really saying something, because multiculturalism is one of the most destructive forces in the world today in my opinion.


I think this whole notion that assimilation is preferable to separatism when accepting immigrants is a relatively new one... and a politically correct one (that reinforces the current world trend towards egalitarianism and the long-term development of a world-wide communist state).

Even in Australian immigration policy in the early 20th century politicians knew the important place that inter-ethnic separatism had in ethnic preservation...


‘White Alien’ (non-British European) Immigration Policy

The term ‘white alien’ was widely used in the period from 1901 to 1939 to describe non-British Europeans and was particularly directed towards Italians, Greeks, Yugoslavs and Poles. Before World War I there was no specific legislation which prohibited or restricted European immigrants and the numbers wishing to settle in Australia were comparatively small. Nor were Europeans encouraged. World War I and its aftermath, however, resulted in the limitation and prohibition of specific European nationalities for particular periods. It is for this reason that they are considered here under a separate policy category....

.... Legislation adopted in the United States in 1921 and 1924 to restrict entry to certain southern and eastern Europeans, led to fears that many would turn instead to Australia. A variety of measures was adopted to counteract this, including numerical limits (or quotas) and landing-money requirements. Regulations were adopted in 1924 and 1925 which required all ‘alien’ migrants to possess £40 landing money or hold landing permits issued as a result of their maintenance or employment being guaranteed by relatives or friends in Australia.

Despite these measures, there was a general increase in the number of ‘white aliens’ arriving as the 1920s progressed. This led the Queensland government to appoint a Royal Commission in 1925, chaired by T A Ferry, on the social and economic effects of European migration....

.... The balance between British and European immigration, however, was changing and this, for many conservative British-oriented Australians, was a cause for concern. A major preoccupation of policy-makers at this time was the establishment of ‘alien enclaves’.



Source : http://www.naa.gov.au/naaresources/publications/research_guides/guides/immig/frames/chapt04.htm

Beornulf
Friday, June 20th, 2008, 02:22 PM
Nationalism is just a past-time for most, a sort of hobby.

ChaosLord
Saturday, June 21st, 2008, 12:22 AM
In my opinion I don't think that a foreigner should have the right to even participate in the celebration. It's Norway's celebration for Norwegians. An african or middle-easterner should really have no part of it, because in reality they don't give a rat's ass about the country, except for it's social welfare and to exploit it further.

Blod og Jord
Sunday, May 24th, 2009, 12:24 AM
Do you believe foreigners should have the right to fly the national flag of another country?
No. Of course not.
A foreigner, especially a Muslim doesn't fit in Danish nation.
I'm very offended if a Muslim uses the Danish flag.
But most of the time they use it to burn it,
that is as offensive if not more than flying it.