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Dagna
Sunday, May 11th, 2008, 07:18 PM
Faroe to revive “vivda” in Shetland

A FAROESE firm hopes to build an old fashioned meat drying facility in Lerwick to satisfy demand for a gourmet product in Denmark.

Years ago Shetlanders ate old sheep, which had been air-cured over several months. It was known as “vivda”, though the taste was not to everyone’s liking.

However in Faroe and Denmark vivda is a delicacy which has never gone out of favour and the Scandinavians simply can not get enough of the stuff to keep everyone happy.

Now Faroe Foods Ltd have hit on the idea of building a drying unit opposite the Shetland Marts, at Staney Hill, and using the oversupply of the islands’ cast ewes to export on to Denmark.

The company hope to process up to 6,000 cast ewes each year. Local crofters believe this will increase the value of the sheep which last year were selling for as little as £2 a head.

Last year Shetland was unable to sell the vast majority of its cast ewes due to the foot and mouth restrictions. As a result the local council set up a scheme that culled 1,200 cast ewes, which crofters said they could not afford to feed over the winter months.

http://www.shetland-news.co.uk/news_05_2008/Faroe%20to%20revive%20vivda%20in%20Shetl and.htm

Oswiu
Thursday, May 15th, 2008, 02:35 AM
Sounds nice! Has anyone had this? I'd love to hear what it tastes like. Anything like that funny old ham that the Spanish so praise? I'm often minded of the lack of available good savoury snacks, and the overabundance of sweet alternatives. Such a product as vivda might fill this void nicely. How do you eat the stuff? On its own or as part of a larger dish? In sandwiches?!? Any recommended condiments?

Jónurin
Thursday, May 15th, 2008, 04:01 AM
It's called "skerpikjøt" [shersh-puh-chut] in Faroese. I don't think the Danes like it. I think this project is mainly intended for Faroese people residing in Denmark. I guess the reason why they're doing it in Shetland is because it's illegal to transport skerpikjøt accross an EU-border.

I've had this since I was little, but only started liking it a year or two ago. It's really good on a slice of light rye-bread.

Someone mentioned Spanish ham. I've been to Gran Canaria, and they had some kind of ham which was pretty similar to skerpikjøt in texture and taste.

johanpeturdam
Tuesday, June 17th, 2008, 07:10 PM
It's called "skerpikjøt" [shersh-puh-chut] in Faroese. I don't think the Danes like it. I think this project is mainly intended for Faroese people residing in Denmark. I guess the reason why they're doing it in Shetland is because it's illegal to transport skerpikjøt accross an EU-border.

Indeed, it's illegal to import Faroese sheep products not prepared in special slaughterhouses into the EU. I believe, the reason is hygienics and just exactly how mutton is prepared.

Btw. X-SAMPA transliteration (can't do IPA, alas), of skerpikjøt: ["SEs`p@%tS2:t]


Someone mentioned Spanish ham. I've been to Gran Canaria, and they had some kind of ham which was pretty similar to skerpikjøt in texture and taste.

I think, Parmesan ham is also comparable to both Spanish ham and skerpikjøt.