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View Full Version : Myths of South America - Evidence of a Migration related to Siberians and East Asians?



morfrain_encilgar
Friday, April 9th, 2004, 09:25 AM
The myths of South and Central America are divided into two groups by geography. One of them is from Central America, down the Andes, across into southern Brazil and also further down into Patagonia. The other one is centred on Eastern South America.

The Central American group may be evidence of a migration related to Siberians and East Asians, who share similar myths. The myths of the Eastern group have links with those from the Mediterranean and Europe east to Mongolia and Tuva (the border with Siberia), and it is suggested that they also arrived with a migration through Siberia and Alaska. Becides these two migrations, Australian themes are also noticed.

Scoob
Friday, April 9th, 2004, 10:13 AM
Fascinating stuff! Too bad the article was writte/translated in somewhat broken English.

There are many cultural, genetic, and (it seems) physical similarities between Central Americans and East Asians. Chinese scholars consider Mesoamerican civilization to have been influenced by fleeing Shang people.

morfrain_encilgar
Friday, April 9th, 2004, 10:33 AM
Fascinating stuff! Too bad the article was writte/translated in somewhat broken English.

There are many cultural, genetic, and (it seems) physical similarities between Central Americans and East Asians. Chinese scholars consider Mesoamerican civilization to have been influenced by fleeing Shang people.

No, the crops used in Central America are different from those used in northern or southern China. This means that the origins of both civilisations are independant.

Siegfried
Friday, April 9th, 2004, 10:40 AM
No, the crops used in Central America are different from those used in northern or southern China. This means that the origins of both civilisations are independant.

I'm not sure you can draw that conclusion. Isn't it possible that the agricultural habits of the two groups simply diverged over time?

morfrain_encilgar
Friday, April 9th, 2004, 10:49 AM
I'm not sure you can draw that conclusion. Isn't it possible that the agricultural habits of the two groups simply diverged over time?

No, the unrelated plants and animals are derived locally from different "hearths". They didn't arrive in the Americas from outside.

They have unrelated ancestors, which are found locally in the wild, in each region.

Scoob
Friday, April 9th, 2004, 06:31 PM
No, the unrelated plants and animals are derived locally from different "hearths". They didn't arrive in the Americas from outside.

They have unrelated ancestors, which are found locally in the wild, in each region.
Interesting... but what if the Shang imposed themselves as a warrior elite over xisting Mesoamerican agriculturalists. Could that offer a plausible interpretation of the archaeological evidence?

http://www.chinese.tcu.edu/www_chinese3_tcu_edu.htm

morfrain_encilgar
Friday, April 9th, 2004, 08:23 PM
Interesting... but what if the Shang imposed themselves as a warrior elite over xisting Mesoamerican agriculturalists. Could that offer a plausible interpretation of the archaeological evidence?

http://www.chinese.tcu.edu/www_chinese3_tcu_edu.htm

I doubt it if they didn't bring Chinese crops or domesticated animals. Or metal tools from Asia.