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Gefjon
Sunday, November 18th, 2007, 04:26 PM
Would be interesting to see how many here speak English as a native/non-native language. Almost everyone speaks great English eventhough they fly non-Anglo-Saxon country flags, I'm pleasantly surprised! :D

Dagna
Tuesday, November 27th, 2007, 07:17 PM
English is my native language. I believe it is the native language of most members of this forum but I agree with you, everyone seems to speak it without problems.

SineNomine
Tuesday, November 27th, 2007, 07:23 PM
It's my native language. I grew up in a rather English area of ZA. I didn't learn Afrikaans, and I only learnt Greek later, as a second language, and French as a third.

Fafner
Tuesday, November 27th, 2007, 07:35 PM
Mi native language is Spanish and I started learning English when I was about 7 or 8 years old. I finished the course 2 or 3 years ago (I can't remember :p) but I think you never stop learning the language, not even the mother tongue :)

Oh, I learnt both British and American English :)

Thusnelda
Tuesday, November 27th, 2007, 07:36 PM
My native language is German, English is my 2nd language. I´m making some errors while writing and speaking it.

Loyalist
Tuesday, November 27th, 2007, 07:38 PM
English is my native language; luckily coming from a strongly Anglophone family in a nation with French over-representation. If I had to count a second language, I would say German (far from fluent, however).

Schmetterling
Tuesday, January 8th, 2008, 02:23 PM
English is my second language and the language I speak best. It would be incorrect to say it is my first because my first is German. Native implies being born with it so I have a bit of trouble calling English my native language.

Siebenbürgerin
Thursday, March 20th, 2008, 01:25 PM
In Order of learning English is my 4th Language. I have two Native Languages, Romanian and German. The first foreign language I studied was French. However, during Gymnasium, I was moved to an advanced English speaking Class. So, my French isn't as good as my English today. :o

Alice
Thursday, March 20th, 2008, 01:38 PM
English is my native language. I also speak Spanish and Finnish, albeit rather poorly.

Frieden
Sunday, July 27th, 2008, 04:59 PM
I would just like to complement all of you euro's that speak english. I would never have the will to learn two languages. You all speak it surprisingly well. It really makes it easier for me. ;D

The reason I'm saying this is because I would be pretty upset if, by social pressure (work), I had to learn the super power of the days language. As a member of the super power I just want to say, "You are appreciated."

OneEnglishNorman
Sunday, July 27th, 2008, 07:22 PM
Yes, their English is good. For some, their ability to understand implied meanings is not quite so good.

Ensomheten
Wednesday, July 30th, 2008, 05:50 PM
Well, thank you very much. ;) Norwegian children have compulsory English lessons from the age of seven, and most Norwegian with a higher degree is trilingual with German or French as the most common third language. I try to keep my English at a decent level, but my German has become what you English would call piss poor.

andrea
Wednesday, July 30th, 2008, 06:30 PM
I have two native languages, Romanian and German, though Hungarian should be my 3th native language, but i don`t speek Hungarian well. In school I learn German as native language, Romanian as second language and English as 3th language. I`m also studying French. But I speak better Hungaian than French.

LaNordisante
Thursday, July 31st, 2008, 01:17 AM
I said English was my second language but I have pretty much been speaking English just as long as I have been speaking French. I speak French to my family but I've always spoke English.

SwordOfTheVistula
Thursday, July 31st, 2008, 02:00 AM
In school I learn German as native language

How does that work, German language schools in Romania? Do you attend private schools, or do you mainly live in all-German villages where German is the local language, or do the major cities have seperate German language schools for the Germans?

andrea
Thursday, July 31st, 2008, 10:08 AM
How does that work, German language schools in Romania? Do you attend private schools, or do you mainly live in all-German villages where German is the local language, or do the major cities have seperate German language schools for the Germans?

I do not attend a private school. German language classes are something usual in Transylvania, you will find in each bigger city such a class. Most of them have a partner school in Germany.
I attend a public College, which has a German language class. Each student from here can study in such a language calss if they want, its not only for Germans.

SwordOfTheVistula
Thursday, July 31st, 2008, 11:15 AM
That's good I suppose, but what language are your regular classes (math, science, literature, etc) taught in?

andrea
Thursday, July 31st, 2008, 11:21 AM
That's good I suppose, but what language are your regular classes (math, science, literature, etc) taught in?

My regular classes are in German language. Beside this, i`m studying English, and French, and also Romanian literature.

arthor
Friday, August 8th, 2008, 01:16 PM
cyfarchion (Welsh)

Oh, I learnt both British and American English :)[/QUOTE]

Personally, I refuse to acknowledge the term "American English". No such thing. There is American which shares a great many words with English.
Not sure if there is such a thing as British English either.

wasshael (Old English)

MockTurtle
Friday, August 8th, 2008, 01:24 PM
Native tongue for me. I wouldn't have it any other way.

Although, I am quite fascinated with other European languages; my strongest second language would be French.

Sigurd
Friday, August 8th, 2008, 01:44 PM
I speak English as a quasi-native language. It would be wrong to say that it was my first language, for that was German; but I have been virtually bilingually brought up, so I learnt it at an age where others still sucked their thumb.


How does that work, German language schools in Romania? Do you attend private schools, or do you mainly live in all-German villages where German is the local language, or do the major cities have seperate German language schools for the Germans?

Transylvanian Saxons and Ländler in Romania, Donauschwaben in Hungary etc. are not an uncommon sight. In Transylvania, for the traditional ethnic make-up, many places are labelled not only in Romanian but also either in Hungarian or German. "Municipiul Sibiu" also reads "Hermannstadt" on the sign, for example, to my knowledge. ;)

The Horned God
Friday, August 8th, 2008, 01:54 PM
English is not my native language but it is my first language. ;)

Guntwachar
Friday, August 8th, 2008, 06:45 PM
Dutch is my native language, English my 2nd and German 3th after that will come Latin,Spanish and French the languages i failed to remember:p

Nachtengel
Friday, August 8th, 2008, 06:48 PM
I studied English as a second langauge. I'm also learning a little bit French.

GreenHeart
Tuesday, August 12th, 2008, 03:03 AM
English is my native language. I live for years in Germany, and my German has been useful for some time and is nearing fluent by now.

Ich hätte lieber deutsch als meine Muttersprache gehabt. Ich mag englisch nicht so gern.

Gorm the Old
Tuesday, August 12th, 2008, 03:28 AM
English is my native language. Given its illogical orthography and inconsistent grammar, I am glad that it is because I would hate to have to learn it as a second language ! I really admire those who have succeeded in doing that.

Though I grew up in a Norwegian-speaking home, my second language is definitely German. The Norwegian spoken in my home was a rustic dialect called "bondespråk" [literally, "farmer talk"], specifically the bondespråk of the Arnefjord area near Bergen. I never studied it formally and, not knowing the grammar, could not write it.

I studied German in college in 1950 and 1951 and acquired a good reading, writing, and speaking knowledge of it, but never learned to understand spoken German easily.

Given 57 years in which to forget it, I now hesitate to write anything of any length in German. By using only the weak endings of nouns and adjectives and slurring the definite article until it becomes "d' "so that der can't be told from die or das, I can speak German fairly comprehensibly without fully displaying my ignorance.