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Veritas ∆quitas
Monday, December 4th, 2006, 04:55 PM
Everybody gets 'down' in the faith, and I am no acception.. But things have been getting really wierd for me .. Something's been drawing me further away from the Church and Scripture, and a hell of alot closer to nature and it's happened all of a sudden, without warning. I get peace from reading scripture, but there's a different peace I get in the wilderness. A much more 'natural' feeling .. and it beckons me. Almost like a pull.

I'd like to hear from Christians especially about their ups and downs, and maybe some advice.

Aupmanyav
Saturday, December 9th, 2006, 02:36 AM
A much more 'natural' feeling .. and it beckons me. Almost like a pull.Let me state in the beginning that I am not a christian. Nice posts. In the wilderness you are alone with yourself. Scriptures are about a society (not God), naturally, they entail curbs (do this, do not do this). Perhaps that is why the more natural feeling, IMHO.

nštdeutsch
Saturday, December 9th, 2006, 02:44 AM
Everybody gets 'down' in the faith, and I am no acception.. But things have been getting really wierd for me .. Something's been drawing me further away from the Church and Scripture, and a hell of alot closer to nature and it's happened all of a sudden, without warning. I get peace from reading scripture, but there's a different peace I get in the wilderness. A much more 'natural' feeling .. and it beckons me. Almost like a pull.

I'd like to hear from Christians especially about their ups and downs, and maybe some advice.

Nothing Un-christian about that. Just look at St. Francis of Assisi, or read the Psalms. they knew, as do most religions that there is no substitute for nature. Frequently masses are celebrated outdoors because what better church can we find?

I think sometimes Christians erroneously think that being in nature is somehow unchristian, but this really isnt the truth. the use of certain natural analogies is central to the Christian faith and shouldn't be forgotten.

I have the same feelings.

Possible "solution": find a nice brook, its getting cold so you will be able to see your breath, find a nice moss-covered rock, and read some scripture or a great writing, or just reflect on something. Smoke a pipe, a cigar, wear a nice wool hat, breathe in the type of air that makes your nostrils burn a bit, and realize why you are here. Come back from your wilderness retreat, back to civilization with a closer bond.

Oswiu
Saturday, December 9th, 2006, 03:09 AM
Or Serafim Sarovskiy...
http://days.pravoslavie.ru/Images/ib7.jpghttp://days.pravoslavie.ru/Images/ib16.jpg
http://days.pravoslavie.ru/Images/ib788.jpghttp://days.pravoslavie.ru/Images/ib785.jpg
Or Sergii Radonezhskiy;
http://days.pravoslavie.ru/Images/ib2029.jpg:)

HaldŪs
Saturday, December 9th, 2006, 06:31 AM
With me it's the opposite :)

i'm not christian but when i was a very young child my granny taught me the Lord's Prayer and we were praying together often while i was sitting on her lap... she told me that whenever i feel insecure or need help i only have to recite the Lord's Prayer and God will take my fears away.... this really worked and I still do this until this day... when I'm depressed, don't feel good or am scared i curl up under my blanket and pray the Lord's Prayer. i feel immediately protected and secure... nothing matters and I'm safe.

this is very very strange because i don't believe in christianity at all..... i think it's jewish bullshit, lol .... i get a lot out from heathenry and spending time in nature... i can roam dancingly through the forest for hours or sit under an old oak tree... so much peace, tranquility and harmony... i also do many rituals.... but nothing is as comforting as the Lord's Prayer... i blame it on childhood psychology... i felt safe when my granny held me and these were wonderful moments... but maybe there is more to it... :)

Jantelover
Saturday, December 9th, 2006, 10:04 AM
As has been perceptively said: A little philosophy takes you away from religion, and a LOT of philosophy brings you back.

For the word philosophy can be substituted "nature" because the essential difference between both and religion consists in the VULNERABILITY you experience yet willingly and all by your lonesome endure "with nature" versus the social SECURITY religion brings.

Both philosophy and nature connote vulnerability "naturally," for each confronts our mental/emotional and physical assurance, respectively, with forces no mere RECITING or BELIEVING will defeat -- and hence are a siren call for every tyro who ever looked out of a Tasco telescope . But stare at the starry sky too long, and soon, along with Kant, your neck'll get tired and you'll be back in awe of the moral law within -- and voila, Scripture no longer without;).

Unfortunately neither, nor Tasco, gives you much handle on the AWE part, and so, at that point you can either continue the religious way which sees awe from the point of view of moral law, or the scientistic way, which approaches awe from the point of view of the "starry sky" (ie naturalistically).

As Nietzsche dimly glimpsed, the two are deadly enemies, except when you let go of both. What's left then is the "awe," pure and simple, and indeed an a-natural, a-philosophical and a-religious "something" based UPON IT -- a non-religion, non-science, and non-philosophy of awe, without object, save itself.

AlbionMP
Saturday, December 9th, 2006, 10:25 AM
Different people have different ways of relating with the Divine.

If you feel a bit down, don't worry it could be what they call a 'Dark Night of the Soul', it's just a stage in a spiritual journey, see John Bunyan "Pilgrim's Progress" or Daniel Defoe "Robinson Crusoe".

As for being drawn to nature and the wilderness, my advice is good on ya, the more fresh air you get, the better.:thumbup

Veritas ∆quitas
Saturday, December 9th, 2006, 08:03 PM
Yeah I guess you guys are right. Sometimes it just takes some reassurance from others to get you back on track and revive your fighting spirit.

God bless.

GreenHeart
Saturday, December 9th, 2006, 11:24 PM
If God created the world then he also created nature especially in it's beauty and serenity, so why would it be un-christian to revel in nature's greatness?

I'm not christian, but I grew up in a very christian family, went to a christian school for a couple years, been to church countless times, so no doubt it has had its effect on me. However I am a romanticist at heart and there is no better way in my opinion to connect with the divine (like AlbionMP stated above) than by being out in the forest alone.

If you love nature because God created it, then you are a christian.
If you love nature for the sake of nature then you have become a pagan. ;)

Aupmanyav
Sunday, December 10th, 2006, 10:46 AM
Sometimes it just takes some reassurance from others to get you back on track and revive your fighting spirit.Fighting spirit? Fighting what? Again getting on to a wrong track!