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View Full Version : Place to Buy Amino Acids?



Kaotiksoul6sic6
Saturday, September 28th, 2002, 03:47 PM
ok does anyone know the best cheapest place to buy amino acids and other weight lifting supplements and what is the best type to buy

Hellstar
Saturday, September 28th, 2002, 04:01 PM
Listen to me,

This is the best you can get of all amino acids right here.

Amino Fuel, Anabolic Liquid Amino Acid Concentrate

I normally pay 50 dollars for same amount, brought illegal in from Germany. this is hmmmmm legal and for only 20 dollars.

and the content is the same.

there is to 63 days in this bottle, "take twice as large Acid dose" and there is still to a whole month.

PS: remember to take 30-70 gram of clean protein in powder along with your Amino.

http://www.drugstore.com/qxp28413_332828_idif/Twinlab/Amino_Fuel_Anabolic_Liquid_Amino_Acid_Co ncentrate.htm

Larsen
Sunday, October 13th, 2002, 12:20 PM
hey,are you about began with pumpin,its cool all aryan people should do,so vi could be a kind of overhumans,and niggaz turn into slaves again....keep pumpin.

Kaotiksoul6sic6
Sunday, October 13th, 2002, 04:33 PM
yea hellstar is making my program and i am going to get large and brutal and im going to take a kick boxing class so i can really kick some ass

Larsen
Sunday, October 13th, 2002, 04:53 PM
i guess you are an angry young man,thats good.....i mean if you let your anger grow on the lolife!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Glory
Tuesday, August 30th, 2005, 03:19 AM
Has anyone had experience with amino acids and weight lifting? Two days once I started taking them my bench has gone up alot, as much as 10 pounds. I've also gone up a few pounds in other areas like biceps, triceps, etc.

Anyone been taking these for awhile and have experience with them?

Heidenlord
Tuesday, August 30th, 2005, 03:52 AM
Never taken amino supplements. I use creatine and protein powder and have experienced great results with these.

Dr. Solar Wolff
Tuesday, August 30th, 2005, 06:09 AM
Years ago when I was body building I wanted more bulk and so began eating a pound of cottage cheeze after my regular dinner meal. I made no other changes and gained at least ten pounds. For me, this meant going up to about 168 lbs. At that time I could bench 245 and squat about 250. I was about 25 years old. On my off days I would run 6 miles as fast as I could so I was in pretty good shape then.

Stig NHF
Tuesday, August 30th, 2005, 07:59 AM
Hmm....its not very healthy to be weightlifting without added amino acids, seeing as your metabolism goes way up, you burn them more than the body can produce itself, or you get through "normal" eating.

lei.talk
Tuesday, August 30th, 2005, 09:10 AM
here are the only free-form amino acids (http://www.forums.skadi.net/showpost.php?p=116484&postcount=302) that i use.

Bahnstrasser Affenschloss
Monday, November 7th, 2005, 02:35 AM
Amino acids are - as you all know - the basic building blocks of the proteins that muscles consist of. However the use of amino acid supplements is of questionable value, because amino acids undergo significant metabolism directly after being absorbed in the intestine. Some of them may not at all become elements of proteins, but are instead consumed directly to produce energy. Also, the human body has no way of storing amino acids, which results in the pool of free amino acids being very insignificant. Since amino acids are water soluble, any excess will either be consumed to produce energy or excreted in the urine.

That is, why I dare question the benefits of amino acid supplements.

BTW, Creatine phosphate serves no purpose either, because muscles do not store any significant quantities of it; the rest is - as amino acid excess - excreted in the urine. Is it really worth wasting the money just to gain 30 seconds of stored energy?:coffee:

ChrisDownUnder
Monday, November 7th, 2005, 04:14 AM
BTW, Creatine phosphate serves no purpose either, because muscles do not store any significant quantities of it; the rest is - as amino acid excess - excreted in the urine. Is it really worth wasting the money just to gain 30 seconds of stored energy?:coffee:Creatine is one supplement that I have used consistently over the past few years with good results. Along with various types of protein powders, multivitamins, and other supplements including Amino Acids, funds permitting.

I have read various studies that prove Creatine’s effectiveness. The “30 seconds of stored energy” as you put it, is of some benefit. The last few repetitions of your most intense sets are where the gains are made, assuming you are trying to increase your size and strength. :)

palesye
Monday, November 7th, 2005, 06:33 AM
Has anyone had experience with amino acids and weight lifting? Two days once I started taking them my bench has gone up alot, as much as 10 pounds. I've also gone up a few pounds in other areas like biceps, triceps, etc.

Anyone been taking these for awhile and have experience with them?

How much protein do you consume? It should be 2g on 1kg of body weight, not less.

Personally, I use only natural food to get proteins - eggs, chicken, cheese, milk etc.

palesye
Monday, November 7th, 2005, 06:36 AM
BTW, Creatine phosphate serves no purpose either, because muscles do not store any significant quantities of it; the rest is - as amino acid excess - excreted in the urine. Is it really worth wasting the money just to gain 30 seconds of stored energy?:coffee:

Sometimes it is very important. Personally, I always considered creatine the only useful legal food supplement for bodybuilder/powerlifter.

lei.talk
Monday, November 7th, 2005, 07:19 AM
However the use of amino acid supplements is of questionable value,
because amino acids undergo significant metabolism
directly after being absorbed in the intestine.which is exactly what makes them so valuable.

here is a sample of the thousands of research-articles
from peer-reviewed journals
that are readily collected at any university library
or googled from the inter-net
regarding the value of amino acids.
"Glutamine is an important fuel for some cells of the immune system. In situations of stress, such as clinical trauma, starvation, or prolonged, strenuous exercise, the concentration of glutamine in blood is decreased, often substantially. In endurance athletes this decrease occurs concomitantly with relatively transient immunodepression. Provision of glutamine or a glutamine precursor has been found to decrease the incidence of illness in endurance athletes. To date, it has not been established precisely which aspect of the immune system is affected by glutamine feeding during the transient immunodepression that occurs after prolonged, strenuous exercise. However, there is increasing evidence that neutrophils may be implicated."(Nutrition 2002 May;18(5):371-5)

"OBJECTIVE: Intense long-duration exercise has been associated with immunosuppression, which affects natural killer cells, lymphokine-activated killer cells, and lymphocytes. The mechanisms involved, however, are not fully determined and seem to be multifactorial, including endocrine changes and alteration of plasma glutamine concentration. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of branched-chain amino acid supplementation on the immune response of triathletes and long-distance runners. METHODS: Peripheral blood was collected prior to and immediately after an Olympic Triathlon or a 30k run. Lymphocyte proliferation, cytokine production by cultured cells, and plasma glutamine were measured. RESULTS: After the exercise bout, athletes from the placebo group presented a decreased plasma glutamine concentration that was abolished by branched-chain amino acid supplementation and an increased proliferative response in their peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Those cells also produced, after exercise, less tumor necrosis factor, interleukins-1 and -4, and interferon and 48% more interleukin-2. Supplementation stimulated the production of interleukin-2 and interferon after exercise and a more pronounced decrease in the production of interleukin-4, indicating a diversion toward a Th1 type immune response. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation recovers the ability of peripheral blood mononuclear cells proliferate in response to mitogens after a long distance intense exercise, as well as plasma glutamine concentration. The amino acids also modify the pattern of cytokine production leading to a diversion of the immune response toward a Th1 type of immune response."(Nutrition 2002 May;18(5):376-9)
Also, the human body has no way of storing amino acids,
which results in the pool of free amino acids being very insignificant.of course the body stores amino acids - as protein.
Creatine phosphate serves no purpose either,
because muscles do not store any significant quantities of it...there are, literally, hundreds of research-articles
from peer-reviewed journals
that directly contradict your statement.

"Creatine is another amino acid that is phosphorylated in the muscles to store energy. Creatine is a natural by-product of liver, kidney, and pancreas metabolism. More than 70 years ago, it was found that creatine was associated with weight gain and improved nitrogen balance, and it has been shown to increase endurance, strength, and stamina (Harris et al. 1992; Bosco et al. 1997; Greenhaff 1997; Grindstaff et al. 1997; Jacobs et al. 1997; Prevost et al. 1997; Tarnopolsky et al. 1997; Volek et al. 1997; Kreider et al 1998; McNaughton et al. 1998). The most stable and cost-effective form sold today is creatine monohydrate. It is one of the few supplements available to athletes that has legitimate research studies backing its benefits."

Bahnstrasser Affenschloss
Monday, November 7th, 2005, 09:11 AM
which is exactly what makes them so valuable.

here is a sample of the thousands of research-articles
from peer-reviewed journals
that are readily collected at any university library
or googled from the inter-net
regarding the value of amino acids.


Unfortunately these articles are of no use for proving anything, if you don't know the basics of human physiology - which seems to be your problem. No offense.


"Glutamine is an important fuel for some cells of the immune system. In situations of stress, such as clinical trauma, starvation, or prolonged, strenuous exercise, the concentration of glutamine in blood is decreased, often substantially. In endurance athletes this decrease occurs concomitantly with relatively transient immunodepression. Provision of glutamine or a glutamine precursor has been found to decrease the incidence of illness in endurance athletes. To date, it has not been established precisely which aspect of the immune system is affected by glutamine feeding during the transient immunodepression that occurs after prolonged, strenuous exercise. However, there is increasing evidence that neutrophils may be implicated."(Nutrition 2002 May;18(5):371-5)

You did happen to notice, that the abstract you are quoting has nothing to do with the original question, didn't you?

The original question was about benefits for weightlifting - not immunology (the beneficial effects associated with which can be discussed elsewhere).


"OBJECTIVE: Intense long-duration exercise has been associated with immunosuppression, which affects natural killer cells, lymphokine-activated killer cells, and lymphocytes. The mechanisms involved, however, are not fully determined and seem to be multifactorial, including endocrine changes and alteration of plasma glutamine concentration. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of branched-chain amino acid supplementation on the immune response of triathletes and long-distance runners. METHODS: Peripheral blood was collected prior to and immediately after an Olympic Triathlon or a 30k run. Lymphocyte proliferation, cytokine production by cultured cells, and plasma glutamine were measured. RESULTS: After the exercise bout, athletes from the placebo group presented a decreased plasma glutamine concentration that was abolished by branched-chain amino acid supplementation and an increased proliferative response in their peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Those cells also produced, after exercise, less tumor necrosis factor, interleukins-1 and -4, and interferon and 48% more interleukin-2. Supplementation stimulated the production of interleukin-2 and interferon after exercise and a more pronounced decrease in the production of interleukin-4, indicating a diversion toward a Th1 type immune response. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation recovers the ability of peripheral blood mononuclear cells proliferate in response to mitogens after a long distance intense exercise, as well as plasma glutamine concentration. The amino acids also modify the pattern of cytokine production leading to a diversion of the immune response toward a Th1 type of immune response."(Nutrition 2002 May;18(5):376-9)of course the body stores amino acids - as protein.there are, literally, hundreds of research-articles
from peer-reviewed journals
that directly contradict your statement.


No, they do not. The major problem is, that your knowledge of human physiology is so weak, that you can't distinguish relevant facts from irrelevant. The abstracts you currently quote have no relevancy whatsoever to the subject of this thread. Therefore, they do not contradict any of my statements, nor do they in any other way either have anything to do with this subject.

And by the way: Proteins are not a physiological store of amino acids - you know why?

-Because the utilisation of amino acids of proteins require the degradation of these proteins, which you very well understand also makes them nonfunctional. That is why it is physiologically incorrect to think of proteins as some kind of amino acid store - any first year medical student can tell you, that amino acids are the one major exception of nutrients - because they don't have a specific storage system, which so many other nutrients have (eg. glycogen for carbon hydrates, triglycerides for fatty acids and ferritin for iron).


"Creatine is another amino acid that is phosphorylated in the muscles to store energy. Creatine is a natural by-product of liver, kidney, and pancreas metabolism. More than 70 years ago, it was found that creatine was associated with weight gain and improved nitrogen balance, and it has been shown to increase endurance, strength, and stamina (Harris et al. 1992; Bosco et al. 1997; Greenhaff 1997; Grindstaff et al. 1997; Jacobs et al. 1997; Prevost et al. 1997; Tarnopolsky et al. 1997; Volek et al. 1997; Kreider et al 1998; McNaughton et al. 1998). The most stable and cost-effective form sold today is creatine monohydrate. It is one of the few supplements available to athletes that has legitimate research studies backing its benefits."

The evidence concerning beneficial effects of creatine is heavily disputed. What you did not care to mention is, that there is also completely opposite evidence of the effects of creatine (eg. Javierre et al. 2004; Nemet et al. 2005).:coffee:

lei.talk
Tuesday, November 8th, 2005, 06:21 AM
i apologise.
my inexperience led me to respond to your post inappropriately.
i thought your post was the product of ignorance
and i pointed you in the direction of relevant information.

i am thankful
that more experienced discussants
indicated the self-characterisation on your "profile-page"
("A dark eminence" "Angry...Male" "Not into relationships"),
and explained your actual motivation.
thousands of research-articles
from peer-reviewed journals
that are readily collected at any university library
or googled from the inter-net
regarding the value of amino acids.
Unfortunately these articles are of no use for proving anything,
if you don't know the basics of human physiology...i was not attempting to prove any thing.
the articles demonstrate a "cause and effect" relationship.
i am inviting the readers to judge the evidence for their selfs
- not accept any one's statements.




The major problem is, that your knowledge of human physiology is so weak, that you can't distinguish relevant facts from irrelevant. The abstracts you currently quote have no relevancy whatsoever to the subject of this thread. Therefore, they do not contradict any of my statements, nor do they in any other way either have anything to do with this subject.i seem to have given you the mistaken impression
that i am interested in arguing with you
and trading snide criticisms.
Creatine phosphate serves no purpose either,
because muscles do not store any significant quantities of it...
there are, literally, hundreds of research-articles
from peer-reviewed journals
that directly contradict your statement.
No, they do not.i am inviting the readers to judge the evidence for their selfs
- not accept any one's statements.
The evidence concerning beneficial effects of creatine is heavily disputed.only in the same sense that evolution is heavily disputed.
What you did not care to mention is, that there is also completely opposite evidence of the effects of creatine (eg. Javierre et al. 2004; Nemet et al. 2005).i did not refer to those two
for the simple reason
that i was unaware of them.
after the research had been replicated so many times
as to be ineluctably true
and a satisfactory application had been developed
(a decade ago), i stopped reading about it.

Heidenlord
Tuesday, November 8th, 2005, 05:03 PM
I can say creatine works wonders for me! If that is a Placebo effect, I wish someone would trick me with some cheaper stuff, but I don't beleive it is Placebo. I have taking creatine and seen my bench press go up 30 to 50 pounds in a couple of weeks, when before I was struggling. With a good creatine pump i have had my muscles so pumped it felt like the skin was going to rip.

Heidenlord
Tuesday, November 8th, 2005, 07:02 PM
This is what I was using (http://www.muscletech.com/PRODUCTS/CELL-Tech/CELL_Tech.shtml) and I was only using half-doses and still was getting an unbelievable pump.

http://www.muscletech.com/MAIN/IMAGES/PRODUCTS/CELL-TECH/4LB/PRD_CEL_4LB_FPN_new_LRG.jpg