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Vetinari
Tuesday, February 3rd, 2004, 07:50 PM
http://home.ripway.com/2004-1/62802/sicily.pdf

Abstract

This study reports the first data on Y-chromosome-specific short tandem repeat (STR) haplotype frequencies, in the population of the island of Sicily (Italy), based on the combination of alleles at the following 10 Y-chromosome loci DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438, and DYS439. In a total of 117 males, 108 unique haplotypes were observed, with 99 of them being singletons. The 10 locus haplotypes generated a diversity value of 0.9987 and discriminatory power (DP) of 92.30%. The data on the seven of the 10 polymorphisms (DYS19; DYS389I;DYS389II; DYS390; DYS391; DYS392 and DYS393) that have been most studied in worldwide populations were compared with similar data from neighboring Mediterranean populations in order to address the question of shared ancestry, gene flow and population affinities. Overall, results indicate Sicily is closest genetically to the mainland Italian population but also with evidence of a significant African component in the male gene pool. These findings are consistent with those obtained from other genetic markers (autosomal and mitochondrial DNA as well as the classical blood groups) and also with the recorded settlement history (either peaceful or due to invasion) of the island.

Euclides
Tuesday, February 3rd, 2004, 08:31 PM
http://home.ripway.com/2004-1/62802/sicily.pdf

Abstract

This study reports the first data on Y-chromosome-specific short tandem repeat (STR) haplotype frequencies, in the population of the island of Sicily (Italy), based on the combination of alleles at the following 10 Y-chromosome loci DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438, and DYS439. In a total of 117 males, 108 unique haplotypes were observed, with 99 of them being singletons. The 10 locus haplotypes generated a diversity value of 0.9987 and discriminatory power (DP) of 92.30%. The data on the seven of the 10 polymorphisms (DYS19; DYS389I;DYS389II; DYS390; DYS391; DYS392 and DYS393) that have been most studied in worldwide populations were compared with similar data from neighboring Mediterranean populations in order to address the question of shared ancestry, gene flow and population affinities. Overall, results indicate Sicily is closest genetically to the mainland Italian population but also with evidence of a significant African component in the male gene pool. These findings are consistent with those obtained from other genetic markers (autosomal and mitochondrial DNA as well as the classical blood groups) and also with the recorded settlement history (either peaceful or due to invasion) of the island.

Mac Seafraidh
Wednesday, February 4th, 2004, 06:27 AM
http://home.ripway.com/2004-1/62802/sicily.pdf

Abstract

This study reports the first data on Y-chromosome-specific short tandem repeat (STR) haplotype frequencies, in the population of the island of Sicily (Italy), based on the combination of alleles at the following 10 Y-chromosome loci DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438, and DYS439. In a total of 117 males, 108 unique haplotypes were observed, with 99 of them being singletons. The 10 locus haplotypes generated a diversity value of 0.9987 and discriminatory power (DP) of 92.30%. The data on the seven of the 10 polymorphisms (DYS19; DYS389I;DYS389II; DYS390; DYS391; DYS392 and DYS393) that have been most studied in worldwide populations were compared with similar data from neighboring Mediterranean populations in order to address the question of shared ancestry, gene flow and population affinities. Overall, results indicate Sicily is closest genetically to the mainland Italian population but also with evidence of a significant African component in the male gene pool. These findings are consistent with those obtained from other genetic markers (autosomal and mitochondrial DNA as well as the classical blood groups) and also with the recorded settlement history (either peaceful or due to invasion) of the island.
I am still in disbelief on that one. There is so many studies on Sicilians having black ancestary it is not even funny. I have seen websites with the opinion of yes, no, or maybe. It still has not been racially proven, which everyone knows they just want to create more conflict.

Nordhammer
Wednesday, February 4th, 2004, 07:27 AM
Whole blood samples were collected from 117 randomly selected and unrelated healthy males from several areas of Sicily (Italy). All were born in Sicily and also both parents were born and living in Sicily. DNA was extracted from blood using the standard phenol–chloroform procedure [14].

Sicily and North West Africa share five of the seven-locus haplotypes (data not shown) including one that is relatively common in Sicily (13-14-30-24-9-11-13).

Furthermore, these five haplotypes are not present in any other Italian population [20–23]. The shared five haplotypes represent 5% of the total Sicilian haplotypes. These African haplotypes most probably were introduced into Sicily sometime between the 7th and 8th century, during the island’s domination by the Arab Empire. An African contribution to the Sicilian gene pool gains support from several lines of evidence. The problem mostly concerns the duration and the intensity of this introgression. Bernstein [29], Ragusa [30], Barrai [31] started from a different point of view and based themselves on the results achieved, they agreed upon the fact that there has been a low but significant, level of admixture with Africa. Using mtDNA haplotype frequency, Semino et al. [32] estimated that African gene flow in to Sicily ranged between 10 and 34%.

The median joining network used to arrange the Sicilian haplotypes into a phylogeny shows that there are two main clusters. The sharing of haplotypes between North West African and Sicilian populations confirms the contribution from the former population to the island during the Islamic expansion into the Mediterranean basin.

goidelicwarrior
Wednesday, February 4th, 2004, 09:39 AM
Whole blood samples were collected from 117 randomly selected and unrelated healthy males from several areas of Sicily (Italy). All were born in Sicily and also both parents were born and living in Sicily. DNA was extracted from blood using the standard phenol–chloroform procedure [14].

Sicily and North West Africa share five of the seven-locus haplotypes (data not shown) including one that is relatively common in Sicily (13-14-30-24-9-11-13).

Furthermore, these five haplotypes are not present in any other Italian population [20–23]. The shared five haplotypes represent 5% of the total Sicilian haplotypes. These African haplotypes most probably were introduced into Sicily sometime between the 7th and 8th century, during the island’s domination by the Arab Empire. An African contribution to the Sicilian gene pool gains support from several lines of evidence. The problem mostly concerns the duration and the intensity of this introgression. Bernstein [29], Ragusa [30], Barrai [31] started from a different point of view and based themselves on the results achieved, they agreed upon the fact that there has been a low but significant, level of admixture with Africa. Using mtDNA haplotype frequency, Semino et al. [32] estimated that African gene flow in to Sicily ranged between 10 and 34%.

The median joining network used to arrange the Sicilian haplotypes into a phylogeny shows that there are two main clusters. The sharing of haplotypes between North West African and Sicilian populations confirms the contribution from the former population to the island during the Islamic expansion into the Mediterranean basin. arent there studies showing this version and the opposite ? why is Sicily the topic constantly? its probably more European than most large cities.. dont u think ? I mean go to London or even worse.. NY...

Gesta Bellica
Wednesday, February 4th, 2004, 12:08 PM
We know really little about what was the ethnicity of the Sicilian populations that lived there before the Greek and Romans arrived, then it's possible they shared a part of their genetical heritage with the sub-saharian populations (note: i eman the "Original" subsaharian poulations not those mixed races that are living in the Maghreb region nowadays).
But i still find quite suspicious that all those studies always find a moorish influence and they don't find any trace of the norman domination or else...

Nordhammer
Wednesday, February 4th, 2004, 12:33 PM
arent there studies showing this version and the opposite ? why is Sicily the topic constantly.. its probably more European than most larte cities.. dont u think ? I mean go to Londonor even worse.. NY...

I'm just posting relevant excerpts, I would do the same for any other study. I didn't start this thread anyway. ;)

morfrain_encilgar
Wednesday, February 4th, 2004, 01:46 PM
We know really little about what was the ethnicity of the Sicilian populations that lived there before the Greek and Romans arrived, then it's possible they shared a part of their genetical heritage with the sub-saharian populations (note: i eman the "Original" subsaharian poulations not those mixed races that are living in the Maghreb region nowadays).
But i still find quite suspicious that all those studies always find a moorish influence and they don't find any trace of the norman domination or else...

The Maghreb is not sub-Saharan. That would refer to the other side of the Sahara, not to the Mediterranean Africans.

Gesta Bellica
Wednesday, February 4th, 2004, 02:21 PM
The Maghreb is not sub-Saharan. That would refer to the other side of the Sahara, not to the Mediterranean Africans.

i know, but i meant another thing..
The Actual Maghreb populationd have significant negroid admistures (U can find white people mised with almost pure black there) so if the old Moors were like them all those supposed common genes would be explicable.
But the medieval Moors were a totally different population.

Vetinari
Wednesday, February 4th, 2004, 06:14 PM
I am still in disbelief on that one. There is so many studies on Sicilians having black ancestary it is not even funny. I have seen websites with the opinion of yes, no, or maybe. It still has not been racially proven, which everyone knows they just want to create more conflict.

Actually, the research says that Sicilians have north African ancestry, not sub-saharan African ancestors. Therefore, the paper was not saying that Sicilians were related to sub-saharan blacks but to groups such as the Berbers and Arabs.

Frans_Jozef
Friday, February 6th, 2004, 01:40 AM
Actually, the research says that Sicilians have north African ancestry, not sub-saharan African ancestors. Therefore, the paper was not saying that Sicilians were related to sub-saharan blacks but to groups such as the Berbers and Arabs.

Could even go a goodly distance back in time, to be precise in the Last Interglacial period, when in all probability North Africans who somehow represent either a race partly related to Sinanthropus or in an oblique phasing between Homo erectus and Neanderthal(mixomorphism?) crossed the Mediterrenean via Malta and Sicily.
Evidence in caves of Almeria and Valencia seems to support allegations of a group of Neanderthals(?) penetrating Spain during WürmII from North Africa, introducing on the Iberian peninsula the Aterian industry; their famous barbed pressure-flaked points where found alongside Solustréan types of points.

morfrain_encilgar
Friday, February 6th, 2004, 05:43 AM
Could even go a goodly distance back in time, to be precise in the Last Interglacial period, when in all probability North Africans who somehow represent either a race partly related to Sinanthropus or in an oblique phasing between Homo erectus and Neanderthal(mixomorphism?) crossed the Mediterrenean via Malta and Sicily.
Evidence in caves of Almeria and Valencia seems to support allegations of a group of Neanderthals(?) penetrating Spain during WürmII from North Africa, introducing on the Iberian peninsula the Aterian industry; their famous barbed pressure-flaked points where found alongside Solustréan types of points.


The Aterian was associated with Homo helmei, which is believed by some to be the ancestor of moderns and of neanderthals (but not of the earlier European heidelbergensis). Pre-sapiens Europe may show evidence of multiregionalism because of the neanderthaloid nature of Steinheim and Atapuerca, as well as of Petralona and Arago. It is debatable, as to wether true erectus was ever found in Africa. At least most African "erectus" seem to be closer to us, or more distant from us, than Sangran and Zhoukoudien erectus types.

Mac Seafraidh
Sunday, February 8th, 2004, 07:41 PM
If anything in my opinion about Africans immigrating to Sicily and this was mentioned somewhat. I think, if this is true, Africans from the North(Arabian featured) were the ones to settle there. Northern Africa has much more of a Middle Eastern compared to the Negroid look.

Med
Friday, February 13th, 2004, 01:38 PM
The study's findings contradict its claim of a "significant African component in the male gene pool":

"Sicily and North West Africa share five of the seven-locus haplotypes.... The shared five haplotypes represent 5% of the total Sicilian haplotypes." (5% male = 2.5% total)

http://www.geocities.com/medhammer/sicily.txt

Yeah, real significant.

Louky
Friday, February 13th, 2004, 03:24 PM
I thought the Euro-African element in Sicily was confined to the south-east corner of the triangular island. I doubt the African contribution is diffused through the whole Sicilian population. Sicilians are called "Guineas" or "Africans" by Italians of the mainland because, like most people, they apply to the majority what they notice in the minority.