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mothdust
Sunday, January 8th, 2006, 05:11 AM
When I realized I was a poloytheist, the question that came to mind was "What specific gods do I worship?" Most strongly I felt it had to be the gods of my ancestors. I should do honor to my heritage. It was obvious that it would be a pantheon of Northern Europe. But which one do I choose when I don't know my exact heritage. Irish, Welsh, Scottish, Brittish, Anglo Saxon, German, Finnish, general Norse??? So I search everywhere I can for answers. Then, one day, I THINK I know what my heritage is. So I immerse myself in that culture as much as I can. Language, religious beliefs, customs, folklore, myths, gods, art, music, everything.

But, what happens when I find out that I was wrong? That my heritage is not "predominately" what I thought it was. Do I "change horses in midstream"? Does anyone have any thoughts on this they would share with me?

Thanks and Wassail,
Tiffany

Sigrid
Sunday, January 8th, 2006, 05:46 AM
You end up where you feel most at home. This isn't where humans make you feel most at home, they can often be very unpleasant within religions. You must go where you feel a call that resonates in you and through you. Often people of both Celtic and Germanic blood have a religious view that incorporates both cultures. It's up to you. Remember that the trappings are not the faith. The faith is how you respond to the world through your blood connections to it. :)

GreenHeart
Monday, January 9th, 2006, 03:59 AM
You will know which is right for you.

Slå ring om Norge
Monday, January 9th, 2006, 08:33 PM
It is maybe not coincidental that you are attracted here?

What pantehons inspires you, and makes you feel at home?

What gods do you like to identify yourself with?

What god would you want to be like?

beowulf wodenson
Tuesday, January 10th, 2006, 06:20 PM
For me becoming "Asatru" felt like coming home, a natural fit. My ancient ancestors once worshipped these gods in England, and before that Germania. What better 'faith' than that native-sprung from the ancestors? As best as I can tell over 90 percent of my ancestry is English, an easy decision, then, what gods to honor.
I wish more of English heathenry was known, but 'tis the Norse cousins that left the most recorded. :coffee:

mothdust
Monday, January 16th, 2006, 04:59 AM
Thank you all for your responses. It is much appreciated. :)

Wassail,
Tiffany

Thruthheim
Monday, January 16th, 2006, 05:57 AM
For me becoming "Asatru" felt like coming home, a natural fit. My ancient ancestors once worshipped these gods in England, and before that Germania. What better 'faith' than that native-sprung from the ancestors? As best as I can tell over 90 percent of my ancestry is English, an easy decision, then, what gods to honor.
I wish more of English heathenry was known, but 'tis the Norse cousins that left the most recorded. :coffee:

As you probably know, the normans were largely responsible for us English losing so much of the Heathen connection, although it's still there, if you look, it just isn't as publicised and romancitized as the Norse Mythologies.

I find them both so inextricably similiar that I don't mind reading up on either.

Sigrid
Monday, January 16th, 2006, 06:10 AM
There is a group of heathens who are reclaiming the Norman Germanic pre-Christian culture and rejoining the folk.

http://www.normanniireiks.org/

GreenHeart
Thursday, January 19th, 2006, 08:32 PM
For me becoming "Asatru" felt like coming home, a natural fit. My ancient ancestors once worshipped these gods in England, and before that Germania. What better 'faith' than that native-sprung from the ancestors? As best as I can tell over 90 percent of my ancestry is English, an easy decision, then, what gods to honor.
I wish more of English heathenry was known, but 'tis the Norse cousins that left the most recorded. :coffee:

You might be interested in druidry.


http://www.druidnetwork.org/index.html
http://www.druidry.org/modules.php?op=modload&name=PagEd&file=index&topic_id=1&page_id=8

Sigurd
Thursday, January 19th, 2006, 08:33 PM
Isn't Druidry in most cases a new-age, fluffy-bunny group of people? :scratch:

Sigrid
Friday, January 20th, 2006, 05:00 AM
I support NordicPower's choice of Druidry.org. It's a lovely site and Druidry is a noble pursuit. You can join the Druids even if you're from another faith. It's a specific sort of thing and I find genuine Druidry fits very well with the esoteric aspects of Odinism. Besides which the Celts and the Heathens share a great deal culturally and spiritually. Just my opinion.

Thruthheim
Friday, January 20th, 2006, 05:24 AM
There is a group of heathens who are reclaiming the Norman Germanic pre-Christian culture and rejoining the folk.

http://www.normanniireiks.org/

Although Normans(Dane/Norsk origins) are part of English heritage, and lineage(more so the aristocracy and upper classes), i don't feel a huge need to glorify in them, mainly due to them bringing in the Romance language into English. England's outlook prior to Normans was very much North/Scandinavian orientated. Also, the reason we English and those of English descent don't have the Anglo-Saxon Mythology in as high regard as Norse Mythology is largely due to the Change in language, our people lost their folk lore, their myth and legend..

I prefer the Anglo Saxon heathenry groups to be honest.

But don't get me wrong, i don't dislike the Normans, i just wished they kept their traditions and language as opposed to adopting French :P

Brook
Friday, January 20th, 2006, 05:46 AM
Whats in a name? A rose by any other would smell as sweet! And would not Odin, were he not Odin called, retain those dear characteristics to which his name owes? Oh Mothdust, doff thy attachment to the names of the gods of which ye worshipped under the impression that they were the gods of your ancestors, and instead find their appropriate counterparts within the mythology of your true heritage and realize that they are the same gods, they have simply been given different names.

Thruthheim
Friday, January 20th, 2006, 05:53 AM
Whats in a name? A rose by any other would smell as sweet! And would not Odin, were he not Odin called, retain those dear characteristics to which his name owes? Oh Mothdust, doff thy attachment to the names of the gods of which ye worshipped under the impression that they were the gods of your ancestors, and instead find their appropriate counterparts within the mythology of your true heritage and realize that they are the same gods, they have simply been given different names.

if you are referring to the Greek Gods and such.. then yes, they are similiarly related, being heathen and all, but they're interpreted differently.. due to our ancestors and geographic locations.. Which is still just as meaningful.

IvyLeaguer
Friday, January 20th, 2006, 06:08 AM
Isn't Druidry in most cases a new-age, fluffy-bunny group of people? :scratch:

Sigurd..........Pass auf!!!

http://www.odinminirex.co.uk/

:animal-sm :animal-sm :animal-sm :animal-sm :animal-sm :animal-sm :animal-sm :animal-sm :animal-sm :animal-sm :animal-sm :animal-sm :animal-sm :animal-sm :animal-sm :animal-sm :animal-sm :animal-sm :animal-sm

Sigrid
Friday, January 20th, 2006, 08:30 AM
Shield of Danelaw, the Anglo-Saxon tradition has an added problem in that the English were converted early and the Norse tradition had an extra 500 years of evolution before it, too, fell. That is why so much more is known about the Norse.

Because a lot of people share blood now between Celt and Saxon and Dane I think we can be a little more encompassing when it comes to the faith aspects. Gandalf is Tokien's "wandering Odin" and what he represents as a seeker of wisdom and a traveller of worlds, a helper of his people and a great magus is what makes him dear to so many in his many manifestations. And he has many many names and shape shifts considerably to keep him elusive but necessary. It is not easy to know or to hold the Odinic force. Personally, I think his Power in nature is something quite astounding and can be found throughout the mind's many journeys into learning. He seems to stand at the fountain heads of both literature and science and he is inextricably tied to his ancient sage friend Mimir, whom he consults at the well of wisdom even before the pressing necessity of Ragnarok in the mythology. This indicates that everything should be done with an eye on reason. And as Odin will move out of the code and employ lateral thinking, craftiness and ingenuity are part of his personality. He is a dangerous power and a difficult one to hold without succumbing to the negative aspects of purely personal ambition. If that happens then the Odin force destroys its possessor. Odin and Oorlog are part and parcel of the wyrd of becoming, of moving away from the simplistic and entering the complexity of the web. It is no wonder that knotwork and twisted forms are so important as decorative aspects in our culture. They indicate the complexity of existence and functioned to confuse the attempt of evil to enter the closely guarded citadel of the soul. Or any other place, hence their appearance in rings, jewellery and on clothing and wooden and metal adorments. We share this idea with the Celts.