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Blutw÷lfin
Sunday, October 16th, 2005, 08:57 PM
October 31st is - at least in America and more and more also in Europe - well known for Halloween. People dressing up as ghosts and zombies, monsters and other horrible creatures and spend the night with "trick or treat".

For the Celts it was Samhain, Gaelic Samhuinn, originally "sam-fuin". It's celebrated since more than thousand years and marks the end of summer. The Celtic year only contains of summer and winter and at Samhain the old year ends and the new begins. Bonfires are lightened, the bones of slaughtered cattles were cast upon the flames and so on.

The nights between October 29th and November, 2nd marked the beginning of the winter season for the Northern folk. Rememberances of the dead and one's ancestors were made during this feast. The so called Winternights (Vetrablot) was a ceremony of wild abandon; much like the Carnivale season in the Mediterranean countries, and it marked the end of the summer season of commerce and travel and the beginning of the winter season of hunting. Much divination was done during Winternights to foretell the fates of those entering the coming year. It was said that if one sat on a barrow-mound (grave) all night long on Winternights, one would have full divinatory, shamanic (galdr and seith), and bardic (skaldr) powers. Winternights marked the beginning of the Wild Hunt, which would continue until Walpurgisnacht.


So what is your feast? What do you celebrate?

Arcturus
Sunday, October 16th, 2005, 09:03 PM
Nothing at all according to my calendar.

Nightmare_Gbg
Sunday, October 16th, 2005, 09:08 PM
The only thing i observ on that day is all saints.A time to remember dead family and friends.I used to live right next door to a cemetery and on all saints it looked like a sea of candles lit by the relatives of those who are burried there.

palesye
Sunday, October 16th, 2005, 09:12 PM
Karachun, Korochun or Krač˙n is a Slavic version of Halloween as a day when the Black God and other evil spirits are most potent. It was celebrated by pagan Slavs on the longest night of the year, i.e., the night of the winter solstice (December 21).

On this night, Hors, symbolising old sun, becomes smaller as the days become shorter in the Northern Hemisphere, and dies on December 22nd, the winter solstice. It is said to be defeated by the dark and evil powers of the Black God. On December 23rd Hors is resurrected and becomes the new sun, Koleda.

Most scholars have derived this word from the Romanian сrасi˙n for Christmas, but a recently discovered Novgorodian manuscript makes the Slavic origin more probable. Max Vasmer derived the word from the Common Slavonic for "to step forward". In this case, Karachun may be translated as "the day which connects the old year with the new one". It is opposed to the summer solstice holiday, Ivan Kupala.

In some Slavic languages, the word came to denote unexpected death of a young man and the evil spirit who makes life shorter.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korochun"

Arcturus
Sunday, October 16th, 2005, 09:14 PM
The only thing i observ on that day is all saints.A time to remember dead family and friends.I used to live right next door to a cemetery and on all saints it looked like a sea of candles lit by the relatives of those who are burried there.
According to my calendar that is on November 5th with Nov. second being 'Alla sjńlars dag'..

TisaAnne
Sunday, October 16th, 2005, 09:15 PM
I don't celebrate anything for this 'holiday'. When I was a child, I had always wanted to do the Halloween trick-or-treating thing, but my mother was (is) a religious fiend, and apprarently, Halloween is evil :oanieyes ... so, instead of joining my friends for a fun-filled night of roleplay and candy, we would have a small family get-together for my brother's birthday, which is October 31st... mind you, it was really boring, as all of our childhood friends were out for the halloween festivities, and my brother and I were stuck at home with mom, the bible, and chocolate cake (which was the only highlight). Tough childhood, indeed. :P

Nightmare_Gbg
Sunday, October 16th, 2005, 09:16 PM
Well it tends to dissapear due to halloween anyway.

Weg
Sunday, October 16th, 2005, 10:16 PM
Samhain. The Catholic Allsaints here is based on our pre-christian and celtic heritage. It's also the time to meet the forefaters on their grave.

Ryan Kirk
Sunday, October 16th, 2005, 10:34 PM
Both in a way. It's very much a Samhain type night on the 31st here, but we also have partying going on for a few days before and afterwards.

Sigurd
Sunday, October 16th, 2005, 10:41 PM
Being of Northern descent, have a wild guess. :D

Sigurd
Sunday, October 16th, 2005, 11:37 PM
me=heathen=have a few wild guesses.

newenstad
Sunday, October 16th, 2005, 11:40 PM
Halloween :redface: ...
I like candies...;) :D

HIM
Monday, October 17th, 2005, 02:58 AM
....it was really boring, as all of our childhood friends were out for the halloween festivities, and my brother and I were stuck at home with mom, the bible, and chocolate cake (which was the only highlight). Tough childhood, indeed. :P

You never got to go trick-or-treating? :frown:

Well, I don't know about you guys, but I'm definitely doing some trick-or-treating this year. I love candy! :P

Zyklop
Monday, October 17th, 2005, 05:13 PM
In Germany the retail introduced this whole Halloween crap during the last few years as another cool American trend. And just as expected these consumer idiots swallow it like there is no tomorrow.
A more doglike submissiveness to the occupying plastic culture I have yet to see.

Zyklop
Wednesday, October 19th, 2005, 06:03 PM
On request by lei.talk an (slightly esoterical) article dealing with the astronomical background of Halloween:

http://www.souledout.org/nightsky/halloweenpleiades/halloweenpleiades.html

perkele14
Wednesday, October 19th, 2005, 06:26 PM
Kekri (http://www.hass.org.uk/culture.php?page=kekri) took/ takes place around that time in Finland.. :bier:

SaveEurope
Wednesday, October 19th, 2005, 06:40 PM
Halloween!

Trick or treat, Blutw÷lfin. :richter: <---me in my judge costume

Blondie
Friday, October 21st, 2005, 12:26 AM
I love Halloween. :)

Blutw÷lfin
Friday, October 21st, 2005, 12:40 AM
Thanks to the Gods the US-version of how to celebrate our ancestors is not so trendy over here, although some people still feel better when they're able to copy a Disney-like and childish behaviour such as Halloween. Dressing up as a ghost or zombie to honour my forefathers? Well... no.

Halloween might be based on Heathen roots (Samhain; in at least some places in Ireland October 31st is still known as "Oidhch Shamhna" - but it's not celebrated like the Americans do it), but it became completely distorted. :speechles

PsycholgclMishap
Monday, October 31st, 2005, 11:28 PM
Speaking of which, if you click on "Halloween" under "Today's Events" on the main forum menu the lyrics to The Misfits' "Halloween" comes up. Very nice, Folkish! :)

Gorm the Old
Tuesday, November 1st, 2005, 04:00 PM
I don't celebrate any of them, though I do celebrate the Vernal Equinox, a much more cheerful occasion. I have always thought that the year should begin at the real beginning, the Vernal Equinox when the world begins anew.I do not cooperate with the juvenile protection racket called "trick or treat". This is not an old custom but was invented by the candy manufacturers shortly after World War II, for the purpose of selling candy. Before then, there were tricks, mostly perpetrated by mischievous teenaged boys, and there were treats, usually a doughnut and a glass of cider or, possibly, a candy apple, but there was no connection between them.

Sigurd
Tuesday, November 1st, 2005, 04:07 PM
As some of you may have been made aware, as one who had to help organizing a "Halloween" party, I had to dress up to welcome the people. I of course went by my own style. Bought a plastic axe, a black long cape and used a kind of corpsepaint on my face (well, I couldnt get the white from anywhere, as all the places were allready preparing for "Christmas" :mad: ) So I just got myself some eyeliner for the corpsepaint, and well went as BM Executioner. lol...

lei.talk
Friday, November 4th, 2005, 08:07 PM
according to my night-sky wall-poster (http://www.shopatsky.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWCATS&Category=41)
from sky & telescope (http://skyandtelescope.com/news/) magazine,
the original astro-signifier of this holiday
will be even easier to spot, this year,
because the moon (http://stardate.org/nightsky/moon/) will be dark
and a fat red mars (http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2005/22sep_doublemars.htm)
will be at it's brightest prominence
adjacent to the seven sisters (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pleiades_%28star_cluster%29#History)
near the zenith on halloween at mid-night (http://www.miamisci.org:8080/ramgen/stargazer/SG0542.rm?usehostname).

this on-line planetarium (http://www.fourmilab.ch/yoursky/) can illustrate the situation.

DreamWalker
Saturday, November 5th, 2005, 10:06 PM
Halloween is not solemn, true, just festive good clean fun, an escape from the humdrum everyday life. Dress up as Mad Max the Road Warrior or one of his supporting actors:O , and run amok with ladies dressed in angel, hooker, cat, devil, belly dancer, vampire, Elvira, etc, sexy outfits:)

Well, good clean adult fun anyway:animal-sm

And of course the little ones, (and apparently HIM also:D ;) ) like dressing up as well and eating themselves sick with sweets.:speechles

Last festive time before the hard winter really sets in:coffee:

Cuchullain
Thursday, November 24th, 2005, 12:07 AM
Samhain. I like my bonfires. It is also considered to be a catholic feast but I'm not interested in that. Maybe I could combine thae two and burn a catholic. Only joking.:D

Slainte

Ocko
Sunday, October 10th, 2010, 08:23 PM
How do you celebrate Halloween?

Halloween is celebrated on the end of October, when the summer with its light is ending, the harvest is brought in and the dark time starts. November with its storms is coming and it is a time to be more domestic.

It is also said that during that time the border between the worlds of spirit and the world of humans is thin.

It is a time to thank your ancestors and celebrate their heritage.

As a heathen based on more norse/germanic style I also will give honors to the Gods.

Traditionally one also celebrates the disir, the female celestial beings who are in charge of fate. it is good to sacrifice to them.

VikingManx
Sunday, October 10th, 2010, 08:40 PM
I love it. Absolutely love the holiday, the history, this time of year, etc.

It just feels ancient for some reason.

I fill people in on the very caucasian origins of halloween every year...its a great icebreaker for the "you know, diversity isnt all its cracked up to be..." conversation. Halloween has helped me awaken racial consciousness in more than a few people the past three years.

Fyrgenholt
Sunday, October 10th, 2010, 09:28 PM
Ah, the cold, crisp, Autumnal night air, good friends, the sound of laughter and the taste of pumpkin ale as you watch the fire flicker in and around recently chopped wood. The first moon of winter is one of my favourite times of the year :)

Hersir
Sunday, October 10th, 2010, 09:48 PM
We dont celebrate it in Norway.
Some kids like to go around asking people for candy, but it's only the American version. People here are generally not aware of the real meaning of this holiday.

Forest_Dweller
Sunday, October 10th, 2010, 10:01 PM
We dont celebrate it in Norway.
Some kids like to go around asking people for candy, but it's only the American version. People here are generally not aware of the real meaning of this holiday.

There are a few people who know the true origins of Halloween, but most people seem to think it originated in America:doeh

SpearBrave
Sunday, October 10th, 2010, 10:39 PM
I like it as it is a time to carve pumpkins.:thumbup

Yes, I love to carve pumpkins so what. This reminds me I need to add to this thread:

http://forums.skadi.net/showthread.php?t=128957


Besides carving pumpkins the real important part about Halloween is the fall gatherings, bonfires, cookouts and the general meeting up of friends and neighbors.:)

lucid apparition
Sunday, October 10th, 2010, 11:37 PM
This is my favorite time of year! I love preparing harvest meals giving thanks for all I have been blessed with... baking honey wheat bread, making apple butter, cranberry sauce, pumpkin bread, squash pie, autumn beef stew loaded with root vegetables, roasted butternut squash soup, warm apple pie, etc. :D

FranzFed
Sunday, October 10th, 2010, 11:44 PM
The best time of year to watch zombie films:P

Although when I was in primary school the teachers told us that the whole dressing up and asking for candy thing spawned from Latino countries(Day of the Dead?) If anyone has any info to the contrary please share.

Ocko
Monday, October 11th, 2010, 12:26 AM
the winternights are old heathen customs. At the change from summer to winter, after harvest, the surplus lifestock was killed (instead of feeding them through the winter). This happened usually in a form of sacrifice.

From the saga of Gisli:

'Thorgrim decided to give an autumn feast on the eve of the winter season, and to welcome winter and make a sacrifice to Frey, and he invites his brother Bork, and Eyjolf Thordsson and many other important men. Gisli also makes ready a feast and invites his wife's kinsmen from Arnarfjord, and the two Thorkells, and no fewer than sixty men were expected at Gisli's. There was to be drinking at both houses, and the floors at Saebol were strewn with rushes from the rush-pond'

Alfablots (blots for the elfs) were usually held at the change from summer to winter

The anglo saxon chronicle writer 'the venerable Bede' gives us the saxon names for the month. November is Blotmonth, because the cattle is slaughtered and sacrified and then eaten.

As you can see it was a major social gathing as northern custom a big feast.

They drank a lot of mead which was spiced with psychedelic herbs to enhance the effect. (Odin is known to no eat but only drink mead).
(Beer sometimes comes as 'Pilsener' which refers to the psychedelic features of the Bilsenkraut, Churches forbade it and introduced the 'purity -laws' for beer)

Generally there were 3 major celebration in heathen time: yule (christmas), easter and winter nights.

So it is a major event for heathens.

halloween though is made celtic style.

Germanic heathern celebrated the 'wild hunt'. it is somewhat different. The country song 'Ghostriders in the sky' refers to it.

Hersir
Monday, October 11th, 2010, 12:47 PM
the winternights are old heathen customs. At the change from summer to winter, after harvest, the surplus lifestock was killed (instead of feeding them through the winter). This happened usually in a form of sacrifice.

From the saga of Gisli:

'Thorgrim decided to give an autumn feast on the eve of the winter season, and to welcome winter and make a sacrifice to Frey, and he invites his brother Bork, and Eyjolf Thordsson and many other important men. Gisli also makes ready a feast and invites his wife's kinsmen from Arnarfjord, and the two Thorkells, and no fewer than sixty men were expected at Gisli's. There was to be drinking at both houses, and the floors at Saebol were strewn with rushes from the rush-pond'

Alfablots (blots for the elfs) were usually held at the change from summer to winter

The anglo saxon chronicle writer 'the venerable Bede' gives us the saxon names for the month. November is Blotmonth, because the cattle is slaughtered and sacrified and then eaten.

As you can see it was a major social gathing as northern custom a big feast.

They drank a lot of mead which was spiced with psychedelic herbs to enhance the effect. (Odin is known to no eat but only drink mead).
(Beer sometimes comes as 'Pilsener' which refers to the psychedelic features of the Bilsenkraut, Churches forbade it and introduced the 'purity -laws' for beer)

Generally there were 3 major celebration in heathen time: yule (christmas), easter and winter nights.

So it is a major event for heathens.

halloween though is made celtic style.

Germanic heathern celebrated the 'wild hunt'. it is somewhat different. The country song 'Ghostriders in the sky' refers to it.

We call the wild hunt "┼sgardsreia" here in Scandinavia. The Christian version of Halloween is "Alle helgens aften" (All saints eve).
How do you know that the mead was spiced with psychedelic herbs?

wittwer
Monday, October 11th, 2010, 02:34 PM
Yeah, Halloween, it's one of those combined Christian/Pagan celebrations. I like it, always have. There is just something about the days shortening and the Seasons moving from Summer into Fall and the mind and body beginning to prepare itself for the long and dark Winter months ahead...

As for pumpkins, it just wouldn't be the season without one, especially carved. It wouldn't be Halloween without a "pumpkin sacrifice" or "pumpkin caroling". Not too mention the opening and operation of the cider presses and the Maple sugar runs and the world turning from green to Red, Gold and Brown... :)

Ocko
Monday, October 11th, 2010, 03:10 PM
THE mead:



However, there may be an ancient recipe for the gruits (ale-herbs) of the mead in the Anglo-Saxon Nine Herbs Charm. There we read, Mugcwyrt, wegbrade ■e eastan open sy, lombescyrse, attorla­an, mage­an, netelan, wudusurŠppel, fille and finul, ealde sapan. Gewyrc ­a wyrta to duste, mŠngc wi■ ■a sapan and wi■ ■Šs Špples gor. "Mugwort, waybread which has opened from the east, lamb's cress, attorlathe, maythe, nettle, wood sour-apple, chervil and fennel, old sap. Work the herbs to dust, mix them with the sap and with the apple's thickened juice (literally its "gore" or viscous blood)."

Mugwort was considered in an Old English context to drive off evil wights, and was used as a warming stimulant and to soothe the digestive system. It has also traditionally been used to stimulate vivid dreams, and has some of the chemical thujone which is found in the wormwood plant utilized to make absinthe. However, the name "mugwort" could also denote Artemisia Pontica, a wormwood used to make absinthe. "Waybread" is what we call plaintain, and besides being a digestive as well, is powerful against wounds and even venom, and thus may have been used to balance out some of the other ingredients. Lamb's cress either refers to the lettuce-like "corn salad" or to the nasturtium water cress, which has warming properties. Attorlathe is identified in a gloss from 1324 and another from 1507 as black nightshade or belladonna. Maythe is chamomile, which has soothing, nervine properties, acting as a calmative. Nettles were used to treat wounds and to help pain in the limbs, as well as women's menstrual cramps. Wood sour-apple is the crabapple, from which good hard cider is made, with an alcohol content comparable to beer. Chervil is a digestive that lowers blood pressure, cleanses the blood, and was considered effective in lifting the spirits and banishing nightmares. Fennel is also a digestive, and was used to ward off harmful witchcraft.

The main psychoactives in this mix of gruits, if indeed they were used as gruits, are the mugwort (or wormwood), the nightshade, the chamomile, the hard cider, and possibly the "old sap". If indeed wormwood was one of the ingredients, then this beverage might be considered a mild form of absinthe, which has narcotic, hallucinogenic, convulsant, stimulant, and aphrodisiac qualities, and has been related to the effects of cannabis by some. Dale Pendell, in his Pharmako/Poeia, describes the effects of imbibing absinthe : "I was just staring off into space. And the space was beautiful. The light was brighter ... The temperature was perfect. I could feel the air on my arms and face ... It was nice. Everything was nice. The light was different, softer and more intense at the same time. I felt great, actually. I gazed around my studio and spent a lot of time looking at my paintings." (Mercury House, San Francisco, 1995, p. 106.) The mood and sensory enhancement as well as the light euphoria would provide for a good blend of effects. If it was merely common mugwort, there still might be enhancement of visionary experiences, an invigorating feeling, and a feeling of warmth.

Belladonna was a major ingredient in the "flying ointment" of witches. Dale Pendell describes belladonna's effects in his 2005 PharmakoGnosis (Mercury House, p. 261) : "The characteristic signature of the intoxication is that there is no connection made between the general weirdness and that one has taken a drug. It's like a dream that is experienced as real. If you see a strange apparition, maybe a big telepathic sea lion creature with pustules all over its body you think "wow, I've never seen one of those before, and then go on doing whatever you were doing..." (Emphasis mine). He narrates the effects of taking eight drops of a belladonna tincture (belladonna steeped in an alcohol base). It had hallucinatory-enhancing effects on ordinary items. A small whale contraption made for Burning Man was experienced as a live, rippling, moving whale. This suggests that combined with any kind of ritual featuring costumes or re-enactments the effects could be quite powerful, and the earlier citation of the strange apparitions suggests they could be powerful without such re-enactments as well. Its usage in witch flying-ointments alone suggests how powerful this could be. Belladonna also has narcotic and sleep-inducing effects. The fact that Pendell used mere drops of a tincture suggests how low the dosage can be while still contributing powerful effects. (And again, as warning, his tincture was prepared by a very skilled psychopharmacologist, so do not try this at home.)

The chamomile would be an excellent ingredient to calm the effects of the belladonna and create a more relaxed body state, and thus is probably included as a balancing herb. It can create a slight sleepy feeling, which may have reinforced the sleepiness encouraged by the Belladonna.

That hard cider was intended by the inclusion of the crab-apples is made almost certain by the fact that one is to utilize the "gore" of the apple, literally its "coagulated blood". This sounds identical to the pomace or crushed pulp squeezed and pressed to strain the juice. Since hard cider has an alcohol content similar to ale, this would probably constitute the main ingredient, the alcohol in which all the other ingredients would constitute gruits. Moreover, it of course has mythological associations, as Idunn's apples were believed to bring rejuvenation.

Finally, there may be another fermented substance that at one time may have been considered a variety of mead, in the ingredient described as "old sap". Here we must call on Darl J. Dumont's "The Ash Tree in Indo-European Culture" (Mankind Quarterly, Volume XXXII, Number 4, Summer 1992, pp. 323 - 336). There we discover that ash trees exhude a sap that is known pharmaceutically as "manna", and produces a type of sugar known as "mannite". Dumont quotes from the 1878 edition of The Dispensatory of the United States of America (G. Wood and E. Bache, Lippincott, Philadelphia, 14th edition, pp. 572 - 575) : "MANNA... a concrete saccharine exudation of Fraxinus ornus and of Fraxinus rotundifolia... Besides the two species of Fraxinus indicated by the Pharmacopoeias, it is said to be obtained from several other trees belonging to the genera Ornus and Fraxinus among which F. excelsior and F. parvaflora have been particularly designated...It exudes spontaneously or by incisions during the hottest and driest weather in July and August...It is owing to the presence of true sugar and dextrin that manna is capable of fermenting... Manna, when long kept, acquires a deeper color, softens, and ultimately deliquesces into a liquid which on the addition of yeast, undergoes the vinous fermentation." (emphasis mine) The fact that manna must be "long kept" in order to become a darker liquid which may then ferment underlines why the sap described in this charm must be "old". First it must keep for a long time before it can ferment. In fact, manna will not ferment without aging to this state first. Dumont points out that the manna from ash trees was called mÚli by the Greeks, their same word for "honey", and both were considered to fall from the heavens. Since mead is often known as fermented honey, it originally may have been the fermented "honey" of the Ash tree, which would account for Yggdrasil, the Primal Ash, being known as a "mead-tree". Thus, the "old sap" may have generated an ash-mead, and thus the drink may have consisted of a blend of cider and manna-mead mixed with gruits. It might indeed be thought of as a belladonna-tinctured absinthe-mead.

This exhausts the main psychoactive ingredients. It should be noted how many of the other plants have properties which reinforce digestive health, protect from poisons and other toxins, and generally reinforce a sense of bodily healthiness. This goes along with the entire purpose of the mead, which was to be a strengthener of hale. Its psychoactive properties are not contradicted by its general effects as a tonic. These nine herbs were considered powerful medicines against diseases and poisons, and were supposed to have been created by Odin when he hung on the tree. ■a wyrte gesceop witig drihten halig on heofonum, ■a he hongode; sette and sŠnde on VII worulde earmum and eadigum eallum to bote. "These herbs the wise lord [Woden, previously named] shaped when he hung holy in the heavens ; he set and sent them into seven worlds, for rich and for poor, to better all." Stond heo wi­ wŠrce, stuna­ heo wi­ attre, seo mŠg wi­ III and wi­ XXX, wi­ feondes hond and wi­ fŠrbregde, wi­ malscrunge manra wihta. "It stands against pain, it stands against poison, it has power against three and against thirty, against the hand of foes and against far-changes, against bewitchment by harmful wights."


source (http://wyrdmeginthew.blogspot.com/2010/02/what-was-in-mead.html)


If you try it out, just let me know.

Reshki
Monday, October 11th, 2010, 05:37 PM
This has always been my favorite trime of year. The colors, the crunchin of leaves, the smell of the soil, the bite of cold in the air. . .

wittwer
Monday, October 11th, 2010, 06:07 PM
THE mead:





If you try it out, just let me know.

This sounds like a recipe for Spiced Cider and "Apple Jack"... ;)
Good Stuff. Although, I'd drop the Nightshade and Belladona from the recipe. This stuff can be deadly.

Ullrson
Monday, October 11th, 2010, 10:05 PM
Whatever name you prefer it's one of my favorite holidays, I love carving pumpkins and eating their seeds and candy, and the fading light feels magical. Our ancestors where right when they said that this time of year is when the boundaries between this reality and other worlds is thiner. It's also the time of year when it's possible to drink hot beverages again comfortably. I just wish that Halloween and Thanksgiving wheren't bulldozed over by the retail industry.

Ragnar Lodbrok
Tuesday, October 12th, 2010, 02:40 AM
I've been celebrating halloween with a winternight type blot ritual offering to Odin and Balder. This along with washing halloween candy down with jager-bombs and even fireworks. Last year I had a great time even though I was solo...no one keeping me company until I walked into the bar.

I plan on doing something like that this year...

ansuz crowning
Wednesday, October 13th, 2010, 05:10 AM
trick or treat with kids, then sometime around midnight or within a few hours after, blot to hela and the dead

Grimsteinr
Wednesday, October 13th, 2010, 02:42 PM
For our Winter Nights celebration and we Offer a Blot to Freyja and the Disir, the Ancestral Grandmothers of Our Folk.
We always have our Winter Nights Blot & celebration, about mid October.
We light the Jack-o-lantern, when we call the Ancestors to be with us, and to acknowledge their presence among us. There'll be lots of Toasting, from the Drinking Horns, to Freyja, the Gods, the Disir & Ancestors, with Mead, Ale & Cider.
Afterward we are having a Feast of Beef stew, with lots of vegetables & barley with fried apples & fresh biscuits.
It'll be this weekend.

Dropkick
Wednesday, October 13th, 2010, 02:54 PM
I like this time of year. High winds, dark nights, leaves on the ground.. lite the fire! :D



For the Celts it was Samhain, Gaelic Samhuinn, originally "sam-fuin".

Samhainn is pronounced something like sow-ain but said as one syllable. :)

Hrodnand
Wednesday, October 13th, 2010, 09:49 PM
I prefer the name "Winternights" because I consider this terminology to be realistically most in line with what our heathen ancestors actually used to describe the overall nature regarding this period of the year.

Lyfing
Saturday, October 16th, 2010, 05:31 AM
We've always called it Halloween around these here parts..

I kid about being Jesus this year..;)

Later,
-Lyfing

saxonbrit
Sunday, November 5th, 2017, 06:30 AM
Did Germanics celebrate some form of Halloween or Samhain? It seems logical since Celtic and Germanic cultures have some similarities.

saxonbrit
Sunday, November 5th, 2017, 06:58 AM
I love the Halloween movies featuring Michael Myers. That guy is so creepy. You never know when he is going to attack. He comes out of nowhere. He is extremely strong and intelligent. He is supposedly under the curse of the Thorn. That is what gives him his power. Definitely worth watching.