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Death and the Sun
Friday, September 16th, 2005, 06:08 PM
Any comments/opinions on this publication ?!?

w0w.grapevine.is (change it into www your self)

Lundi
Friday, September 16th, 2005, 06:43 PM
Well it's a left wing paper highly critical of the Icelandic government and anything that isn’t 100% pro multiculturalism, the Online Editor and most of the staff are also foreigners living in Iceland on a missionary trip to convert Iceland into “Happy Diversity Land”

So I think you can imagine my stance on the B******s ;)

Lundi
Friday, September 16th, 2005, 06:58 PM
They are also responsible for crap like this:

http://www.grapevine.is/pdf/issue2_2004.jpg

The costume the negro is wearing is a traditional Icelandic costume representing what we call the Fjallkonan "Maid of the Mountain", this costume emerged during the independence movement and symbolized what Icelanders considered to be genuine and purely Icelandic, in her purity (the Fjallkonan, not the negro model) she reflected a deep-seated, but unattainable, wish of Icelanders to be a totally independent nation. Fjallkonan is thus not only a national symbol, she also represents the national vision, the nation's ultimate dream.

So understandingly every single costume rental in the Reykjavík area denied the magazine to rent their costume when they found out what they planned to do with it (much to the surprise of Grapevine), in the end they managed to get a hold on the costume some how.

They were also asked by many Icelandic societies and Government officials not to publish this ,as it is one of the most important traditions in Iceland, but of course being the Multis they are this only drove them on with much eagerness.

Here you can read the article (on page 5)

http://w0w.grapevine.is/pdf/issue2_2004.pdf (change it into www your self)


To counter localised ideals of beauty, as well as to embrace the multicultural society, we decided to ask a black woman to wear the costume. We thought this was kinda nice.

Ahh they thought it would be kinda nice, well then it's totally fine :)

HIM
Friday, September 16th, 2005, 07:21 PM
So understandingly every single costume rental in the Reykjavík area denied the magazine to rent their costume when they found out what they planned to do with it (much to the surprise of Grapewine), in the end they managed to get a hold on the costume some how.

Also they were asked by many Icelandic societies and Government officials not to publish this as it one of the most important traditions in Iceland, but of course being the Multis they are this only drove them on with much eagerness.



It is good to know that they were refused service at the costume rental shops and that Icelandic societies frowned upon it. However, it would be better if the government just kicked the whole lot of them out!

It is outrageous to believe that foreigners come to Iceland in attempts to change their society. How dare they meddle in affairs that do not pertain to them. This is one of the things that angers me more than anything else. It's just like Mexicans coming here and telling us how to run things. Americans trying to make America a multicult nightmare is one thing, but for foreigners to do it is ten times worse, IMO.

Lundi
Friday, September 16th, 2005, 07:29 PM
It is outrageous to believe that foreigners come to Iceland in attempts to change their society. How dare they meddle in affairs that do not pertain to them.

It would be far easier for you to ask these foreigners, since the online editor and his buddies are all American ;)

DreamWalker
Friday, September 16th, 2005, 08:04 PM
It would be far easier for you to ask these foreigners, since the online editor and his buddies are all American ;)
Or are they jews holding USA passports?
:coffee:

Lundi
Friday, September 16th, 2005, 08:54 PM
Or are they jews holding USA passports?
:coffee:

Aye, like Íslenskr said the online editor (Paul Fontaine-Nikolov) possibly is, I'll give you an example of one of his collums:


http://www.forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=5972&stc=1&d=1126900122This image is the original trademark symbol for the shipping company Eimskip, founded in 1914. The symbol has stood at the top of Eimskip’s old building (soon to be a Raddison Hotel) on Tryggvagata ever since. Many have argued to keep the symbol on the building, saying that its original meaning (Thor´s hammer) should not be sullied by Nazism. Others have argued that ideally, no; the original meaning shouldn’t be sullied, but the fact remains that to most people in the West, this symbol evokes images of nationalist racism and genocide, and that sacrificing historical pride for sensitivity might be in order. I bring this up because on the up side, this symbol was covered with a placard bearing the date "1919" within a couple of days of the 60th anniversary of the end of the Second World War in Europe, on May 7th. On the down side, one week later I read one of the most bizarre pieces on the Second World War that I´ve ever seen in a mainstream newspaper.

In an opinion piece from May 14 by Kári Jónasson called “Mannlegur harmleikur” (“A Human Tragedy”), the author examines one of the tragedies of the Second World War. But not the one you’re thinking of, no: Jónasson instead devotes his entire article to the plight of German refugees who died of malnutrition in Danish refugee camps.

I’m well aware of the fact that there were German civilian causalities during the Second World War, and no one disputes or hides the facts in that matter. Not all Germans were Nazis, we know. But to reflect on the 60th anniversary of the end of one of the most evil experiments in genocide in world history by reflecting on the plight of the aggressors is skating on thin ice. It smacks of nationalism, and attracts more of the same: one of the responses to Jónasson’s piece declares, “Don’t forget Dresden,” a civilian German town which was firebombed by Allied forces.

How many Germans cry out, "Don´t forget Dresden!"? In Germany, they´re called neo-Nazis. But in Iceland, it´s an all-too common reaction to any mention of the Holocaust. The sad part is, this reaction actually doesn’t surprise me.

I hate to say this, but I have met far too many otherwise intelligent, cosmopolitan and educated Icelanders who’ve complained about Jewish people “overemphasising” the Holocaust. These are the same people who are convinced that Israel has no right to exist, that “rich Jews control America,” and that there is no difference between the average Jew and a member of Israeli PM Ariel Sharon’s far-right Likud Party. These are the opinions of people who should know better, but apparently don’t.

While Jónasson feels we should “never forget” the suffering of the German people, he comes from the same school of thought as Icelandic Prime Minister Halldór Ásgrímsson, who feels that Iceland shouldn’t apologise for it’s policy of excluding Jewish refugees during the Second World War. As Ásgrímsson’s own press secretary Steingrímur Ólafsson told me, “To whom should Iceland apologize? Where are they now?” Ásgrímsson himself said, “I´m of the opinion that one should be very careful about apologizing for things that happened long ago and for decisions made in the mood of the times.” So while we should never forget the plight of the Germans, we can write off taking a small part in genocide as a decision that happened “long ago,” and was made “in the mood of the times.”

When I spoke to Icelandic historian Þór Whitehead about Iceland’s policy towards Jewish people during the 1930s, he had a lot of shocking things to say: Iceland not only refused to let Jews into the country, but deported those already living in Iceland to Nazi Germany. Iceland traded with Nazi Germany, even into the beginning of the Second World War, when they were forced to shift their markets to the UK and the US after the former put up a sea blockade against Germany. Articles appeared in Morgunblaðið comparing Jews to vermin. “No protests were heard in this country from any side when a whole family of Jews was to be deported to Nazi Germany in 1937,” Whitehead told me. These are just a few examples. As a result, Iceland was complicit in the near-extermination of an entire race of people.

But that’s in the past. We should forget about it and move on. The Holocaust has been overstated. But those German civilians who died in the Second World War, yes, they should be remembered.

Whitehead told me that one of the biggest reasons for anti-Semitism to run unchecked is nationalism and racial pride. “We had the image of ourselves as the great, heroic and pure race,” he told me. “Iceland was very nationalistic even through the 60s and 70s and still today nationalism is a force to be reckoned with in this country.” It certainly is – advertisers appealing to tourists will often employ this motif of a “pure, unspoiled race” in attracting visitors. Managing director of the genetic research firm deCode Kári Stefánsson has often touted the purity of Icelandic genes. Yet as fellow geneticist Einar Árnason wrote to the New York Times in 1999: “deCode genetics has evoked the myth of the homogenous Aryan Icelanders to entice foreign investors. And in Iceland the company has rallied support for its plans by inventing genetic nationalism, declaring that the Icelandic DNA is superior to all other DNA.” Árnason actually reached the conclusion that Icelanders are genetically “mixed” people, but we’re not likely to hear his conclusions any time soon. It wouldn’t fit the image of purity that many Icelanders seem to maintain for themselves and use as bait for tourists.

You could blame this chest-beating nationalism on ignorance. I hope that actually is the cause, because that means the solution is as simple as education; that we can wipe out racism and anti-Semitism by teaching people accurately about other cultures, that as more immigrants from other countries come in, the more informed Icelanders will become about who the rest of the world really are. I’ve seen ignorant people in the States go through a similar change of heart once they come in contact with other ethnicities, so I know it can happen. Those Icelanders who’ve already overcome this ignorance or were never raised within it could lend a hand.

I hope we’re only up against ignorance. Ignorance is easy to cure; virulent racism takes a lot longer to eradicate.

Lundi
Friday, September 16th, 2005, 09:25 PM
but he sure looks and acts Jewish. He wants to found an immigration party in Iceland.

Ah yes, and here is his idea on this party for anyone who cares to read :viking2:


Since immigration to Iceland began in earnest about thirty years ago, a whole generation of non-Icelandic Icelanders has been born and raised here. Today, they and the immigrants who’ve gained citizenship number a little over 7,000 – about 2.3% of the population. At the same time, the number of immigrants with a legal residence in Iceland total over 10,000. Those immigrants who’ve gained citizenship and can now vote or even run for office are able to participate in the government of this country to a far greater degree than those who haven’t. It’s for this reason that the time has come to create an Immigrant’s Party, running on a platform with immigration law reform at the top of the list.

Actually getting a seat in parliament is not as hard as it sounds. According to Icelandic election law, the country is divided into six constituencies: Reykjavík North, Reykjavík South, Northwest, Northeast, South and Southwest. Each one is allotted a certain number of seats in parliament, each seat representing a percentage of registered voters in that consituency. If an Immigrant’s Party were formed, it would probably be most successful in the Northwest constituency. Having the fewest numbers overall (less than 30,000 by 2003’s count), it would only take about 3,000 votes to gain a seat in parliament from the Northwest. And the Northwest also has a booming immigrant population; the number of Poles in the West Fjörds alone could already comprise up to 10% of these potential votes.

But why form such a party? The argument could be made that the whole point of immigration is to become fully integrated with the society at large; that to form a political party around immigrants would be to isolate them. However, forming an Immigrant’s Party could actually aid the process of integration rather than hinder it. Non-Icelandic Icelanders could help reform existing immigration laws and create new ones that would better meet the needs of those who want to be a part of Icelandic society by bringing to parliament invaluable personal knowledge of the immigration experience. In other words, they would bring a more accurate representation of a large piece of the country into the halls of parliament.

Would anyone who wasn’t a non-Icelandic Icelander actually vote for an Immigrant’s Party? Perhaps. Despite disturbing statistics showing an increase in prejudice against foreigners among young people, there remain many Icelanders who believe immigration laws are too strict. There are already political parties, such as the Leftist-Greens and the Progressives, that are beginning to realise that the steadily growing immigrant population deserves representation as well. Upon gaining a seat or two in parliament, an Immigrant’s Party would bring the voice of a large, typically unrepresented portion of the population closer to the ear of the sympathetic.

Even if an Immigrant’s Party never made it into the halls of parliament, it could still influence government in another way: campaigning. An Immigrant’s party could follow the voting records on immigration law of each party in parliament as well as meet with representatives from each of the parties before elections and ask them what their policy on immigration law is. Based on this, an Immigration Party could then give an official endorsement of that party they felt best served immigrants in this country. Such an endorsement could be exercised two ways: by urging immigrants with the right to vote to vote for said party, and by urging immigrants without the right to vote to do volunteer campaign work for them. A well-organised effort in this respect might actually prove more effective than a seat in parliament.

For now, it’s an idea. The next parliamentary elections won’t be until May 2007. That’s an eternity in politics; a lot can happen until then. In the meantime, immigrants in this country would be well advised to pay attention to how the different MPs vote on immigration law and remember what party they belong to. If you like what you see, lend them a hand in staying in parliament. Democracy belongs to all of us.

HIM
Friday, September 16th, 2005, 11:55 PM
It would be far easier for you to ask these foreigners, since the online editor and his buddies are all American ;)

Dang Americans, always causing trouble everywhere they go! Oh wait....:redface:

I agree with Dream Walker. These guys are probably Jews. The editor does indeed look Jewish. But in any event, I haven't been too pleased with a lot of the actions of a great number of my countrymen.

nordnerd
Sunday, September 18th, 2005, 02:53 AM
http://www.armory.com/~rstevew/Public/Fun/piss.gifhttp://www.grapevine.is/pdf/issue2_2004.jpg

I hope this answers your question... :coffee:

Dr. Solar Wolff
Sunday, September 18th, 2005, 05:42 AM
Yes, most likely. I have seen the editors in person and they are a very sleazy lookin sort. Look like they are always plotting something.

http://www.forums.skadi.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=5970&stc=1&d=1126899377

This is the staff journalist Paul Fontaine-Nikolov. I'm not perfectly sure he is Jewish, but he sure looks and acts Jewish. He wants to found an immigration party in Iceland. :violent-s

Why don't you ask this puk if his immigration party is active in Israel? If it is good enough for Iceland, why not Israel or are they too pure blooded to accept anybody as an immigrant? Or, conversly, if they invoke religion as a criteria, then restrict Icelandic immigration to the Norse religion and then kick this kike out of your country.

palesye
Sunday, September 18th, 2005, 09:40 AM
This guy looks like our own jewish media owner, although ours is much uglier.

http://guruken.ru/i/k/kozyrev.jpg

They are all the same...

Náttfari
Sunday, September 18th, 2005, 03:21 PM
Berjumst gegn óværunni; í hverri sjoppu/búð/veitingastað skal taka blaðabunka Rapevine og henda honum í ruslið. Einfalt.

Nordhammer
Sunday, September 18th, 2005, 05:00 PM
Dang Americans, always causing trouble everywhere they go! Oh wait....:redface:

I agree with Dream Walker. These guys are probably Jews. The editor does indeed look Jewish. But in any event, I haven't been too pleased with a lot of the actions of a great number of my countrymen.

Yes please, let's pin the tail on the right donkey. :) This is similar to the confusion of those called Germans or Russians, who are indeed Jews. It's like blaming communism and the Bolshevik Revolution on Russians, when it was in fact a Jewish creation.

nordnerd
Wednesday, September 21st, 2005, 06:21 PM
Berjumst gegn óværunni; í hverri sjoppu/búð/veitingastað skal taka blaðabunka Rapevine og henda honum í ruslið. Einfalt.

:icon_ques :fhclap: :thumbs: