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Constantinus
Saturday, July 9th, 2005, 10:12 PM
This isn't what everyone would call literature, but that's the closest board to it we have.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/history/inourtime/greatest_philosopher.shtml

Who did you vote for? I picked Hobbes, his characterization of man left on his own with no government is dead right.

newenstad
Saturday, July 9th, 2005, 10:22 PM
I just read this:


The final stage of the vote begins on June 6th when you will be able to vote for a philosopher from the final shortlist. The vote ends at midnight on July 7th.
;)

Constantinus
Saturday, July 9th, 2005, 10:25 PM
I know, but the site is still up (I only saw it today), doesn't mean we can't have our own poll.

jcs
Saturday, July 9th, 2005, 10:49 PM
It must go to Aristotle. The "footnote" surpassed Plato by far in his contributions to philosophy.
Descartes and Nietzsche come close in importance, Nietzsche winning some style points and coming in second behind the Greek.

Blutwölfin
Sunday, July 10th, 2005, 12:08 AM
Our own poll? Great. Can we add E.M. Cioran to the list then, please? :rolleyes:

Constantinus
Sunday, July 10th, 2005, 12:22 AM
Our own poll? Great. Can we add E.M. Cioran to the list then, please? :rolleyes:


Add whoever you want but explain your choice.

Blutwölfin
Sunday, July 10th, 2005, 12:40 AM
Is there a list already? :icon_surp

Why Cioran?
He was an artist of words, he perfects his use of language and still left it simple, he was the founder of the romantic pessimism, he said some very true things (e.g. "Basis of society : anonymous sweat.", from "A Short History Of Decay", 1949). One of the great thinkers of our time.

Constantinus
Sunday, July 10th, 2005, 12:51 AM
That link I posted offers 20 options, just post who you want, that way we have an open list.

The Horned God
Sunday, July 10th, 2005, 02:47 AM
Nietzsche. He tried to ask the most terrifying questions possible and unflinchingly came to the most exilarating and terrifying conclusions. I would vote for him because of any thinker his work had most effect on my outlook and philosophy of life, at least as far as I'm aware. Strangely enough, second place in that regard probably goes to Epicurus.

Stig NHF
Sunday, July 10th, 2005, 07:49 AM
Nietzsche or Evola.

Náttfari
Sunday, July 10th, 2005, 03:52 PM
Socrates

http://www.accountingethics.com/images/socrates.jpg


and

Friedrich Nietzsche

http://www.filosofico.net/nietzsche.jpg

Death and the Sun
Sunday, July 10th, 2005, 09:41 PM
I wondered who the multikulturalism poster monkey in the poll would be:


Fanon, Frantz (1925 - 1961) - Psychologist and theorist of colonialism who studied the effects of racism and colonization; an inspiration for freedom causes throughout the Third World.

:rofl:

What is not so funny however is that many clueless people will probably vote for him.


http://www.k-films.fr/images/fanon/fanonrond.jpg

HIM
Monday, July 11th, 2005, 04:17 AM
Two great ancient philosophers come to mind that are outstanding and that is Socrates and Aristotle. Also two more modern philosophers that I really like are Friedrich Nietzsche and Bertrand Russell. That is a tough decision. I would have to read more works of each author to get a better opinion on the issue.

Blood_Axis
Monday, July 11th, 2005, 04:29 AM
Two great ancient philosophers come to mind that are outstanding and that is Socrates and Aristotle. Also two more modern philosophers that I really like are Friedrich Nietzsche and Bertrand Russell. That is a tough decision. I would have to read more works of each author to get a better opinion on the issue.
As a Greek, I ought to naturally vote for Socrates, Aristotle, the Neoplatonics, and many other schools of Greek Philosophy as well.

However, I have to confess that my heart belongs to Nietzsche, not because of his words per se, but of the unique ability of his words to sum up the wisdom of all of the above, put it together in poetry, bypass the senses and speak directly into the soul. ;)

My second choice would be Martin Heidegger, for his ontological query in Being and Time.

Thobjorn
Wednesday, November 2nd, 2005, 02:23 AM
most important? definately aristotle, or perhaps immanuel kant.

personal favorite? two years ago it would have been friedrich nietzsche, one year ago, i would have favored soren kierkegaard's proto-existentialism, but now, i am not sure...

the majority of people chose marx?! he wasn't a philosopher, he was a spinner of lies and deceit! :speechles

Constantinus
Wednesday, November 2nd, 2005, 03:17 PM
Well, if you look at the impact of their writings in history, one could make a very strong point, while being completely neutral, that Marx was the most important philosopher. His destructive drivel had more effects on society than that of any other philosopher I can think of.

Zyklop
Wednesday, November 2nd, 2005, 03:27 PM
Konrad Lorenz wasn´t mentioned so far?

Constantinus
Wednesday, November 2nd, 2005, 03:28 PM
Feel free to nominate him.

RoyBatty
Wednesday, November 2nd, 2005, 08:52 PM
While not exactly a philosopher and not necessarily a candidate for the highest accolade, I'd like to mention Machiavelli who was quite brilliant in his own way. (And errrr, I read "The Prince" and liked what I read)

Yours ignorantly
Roy

Constantinus
Thursday, November 3rd, 2005, 11:47 AM
He belongs in this list too yes.

An Fear Liath
Monday, November 14th, 2005, 06:18 PM
Marx was nothing short of a moron... so of course the Brits like him. Of the chaps listed Nietzsche the most heavy duty. He could make you think or bring a smile to your face. Not too bad in my book. My choices would suck big time, so good I didn't vote. Julius Evola certainly should have been in the mix. Not surprising he was not however.... as should Lennon and McCartney.

Death and the Sun
Monday, November 14th, 2005, 07:32 PM
Marx was nothing short of a moron... so of course the Brits like him.

Personal likes and dislikes nonwithstanding, it is in quite poor taste to suggest that Brits are morons. Not to mention the fact that history and common sense prove this to be nonsense.

I'm not going to try to dictate to you whom you allowed to like or dislike, but please don't insult other Nordish ethnic groups here again.

Aor
Monday, November 14th, 2005, 07:54 PM
Stupid Marx made the first place again, of course... :speechles

Rolf Eder
Monday, November 14th, 2005, 08:06 PM
Stupid Marx made the first place again, of course... :speechles
LOL, figures. I would've voted for Kant had I stumbled upon this thread earlier.

Constantinus
Monday, November 14th, 2005, 08:58 PM
I started the thread after the official poll was already complete, so your vote is still valid, but only here. ;)

It appears Nietzsche is the most popular philosopher here.

Aor
Monday, November 14th, 2005, 10:16 PM
I see no poll here though. :icon1:

Constantinus
Tuesday, November 15th, 2005, 01:14 PM
The entire thread is one. Just type out who you pick and why, that's your vote then.

An Fear Liath
Tuesday, November 15th, 2005, 02:40 PM
Actually, I didn't mean the term 'Brits' as an insult at all. Nuances of English I suppose. It was short-hand for... the current intelligentsia and establishment media in the UK..... but that would have been too wordly you see. So that was how the term was used. I used it as one in the US Southland would use it, not as someone born in the UK or Ireland would use it. Now, you see how explainations into English language nuances go on and on... but your point taken and I hope my explaination taken.

To Walk With the Gods, First you Must put Yourself in Their Path... and That Takes Courage.

An Fear Liath

Sigtyr
Sunday, December 4th, 2005, 07:25 PM
Friedrich Nietzsche, but i don't agree with him on many points.

Varg Vikernes has many good points though.

Nordhammer
Wednesday, December 7th, 2005, 07:59 PM
Personal likes and dislikes nonwithstanding, it is in quite poor taste to suggest that Brits are morons.

Quite right. Rather it shows how prevalent the Jewish mentality is in British society.

Constantinus
Tuesday, December 13th, 2005, 05:25 PM
Varg Vikernes has many good points though.

The question is about philosophers, not criminally insane maniacs...

Sigurd
Tuesday, December 13th, 2005, 07:11 PM
The question is about philosophers, not criminally insane maniacs...

A philosopher need not call himself one. He merely ought to "invent" a philosophy. If Marx or Hitler are philosophers, that can make Vikernes one too. ;)

For my own case, I've read to few works of philosoph to make an educated vote. I will do so after the dozen is full, though. :coffee:

Jack
Wednesday, December 14th, 2005, 11:25 PM
Aristotle, then Nietzsche.

Siegfried
Sunday, December 18th, 2005, 12:38 PM
Back on topic; I am particularly fond of the writings of Hegel and Nietzsche. :coffee:

newenstad
Sunday, December 18th, 2005, 05:46 PM
Büchner, Hegel, Nietzsche, and many others...

AlbionMP
Sunday, December 3rd, 2006, 11:09 PM
Nietzsche
Shankara
Eckhart
Schiller
Huxley
Kant
Goethe
Schiller
Socrates
Aristotle
Plato

hermeticist
Friday, December 29th, 2006, 08:41 PM
Nietzsche
Shankara
Eckhart
Schiller
Huxley
Kant
Goethe
Schiller
Socrates
Aristotle
Plato

Kant is the greatest of all time, and his book, "Critique of Pure Reason," the most profound philosophical book ever written (though rather turgid). After Kant, put Plato and Aristotle in second and third position respectively. I notice Shankara on the list, but I don't feel competent to judge Indian philosophers.

Kurtz
Saturday, December 30th, 2006, 04:01 PM
Goethe


???

Aristotle probably comes first.
Other interesting men are: Kant, Plato, Montesquieu, Nietzsche, Schopenhauer, Husserl, Heidegger.

Moody
Saturday, December 30th, 2006, 05:02 PM
???
Aristotle probably comes first.
Other interesting men are: Kant, Plato, Montesquieu, Nietzsche, Schopenhauer, Husserl, Heidegger.

Heraclitus first amongst the Ancients;

Nietzsche first amongst the Moderns.

Germany takes over from Greece.

wöllsteiner
Saturday, December 30th, 2006, 05:23 PM
*nietzsche
*socrates
*aristotle
*marc aurel

...and many others...but these four are my favorites

nätdeutsch
Saturday, December 30th, 2006, 07:21 PM
not Nietzsche, I would rather prefer Socrates, Plato, or perhaps Kant.

SuuT
Sunday, December 31st, 2006, 05:06 PM
In terms of objective standing, Socrates amongst the Ancients (for good or ill); Bertrand Russell amongst the moderns (same).

Subjectively, Nietzsche is the greatest philosopher in the Tradition, if only for what he has done for the fewest, in contradistinction to herd philosophers such as Mill (who are also necessary).

Tennyson
Sunday, December 31st, 2006, 06:54 PM
David Hume's views about Negroes were remarkably sane. I am glad that he placed well.

Nagelfar
Friday, August 7th, 2009, 12:34 AM
Giovanni Gentile, for finishing what Heraclitus & Protagoras birthed in concept, Aristotle & Plato formulated into articulate wording, and that Kant & Hegel refined and furthered into initial systematization.

Runesinger
Saturday, August 8th, 2009, 06:08 AM
I like Aristotle among the ancients, because his work to formalize and articulate the study of logic.

Among the moderns, I like Ayn Rand for her development of the philosophy of Objectivism, as opposed to the degenerate philosophy of existentialism. However, some do not consider her a philosopher - apparently you have to be male to be a philosopher.

Reich des Waldes
Saturday, August 8th, 2009, 07:50 AM
I like Aristotle among the ancients, because his work to formalize and articulate the study of logic.

Among the moderns, I like Ayn Rand for her development of the philosophy of Objectivism, as opposed to the degenerate philosophy of existentialism. However, some do not consider her a philosopher - apparently you have to be male to be a philosopher.

Could you elaborate on this?

Nagelfar
Saturday, August 8th, 2009, 11:56 AM
I like Aristotle among the ancients, because his work to formalize and articulate the study of logic.

Among the moderns, I like Ayn Rand for her development of the philosophy of Objectivism, as opposed to the degenerate philosophy of existentialism. However, some do not consider her a philosopher - apparently you have to be male to be a philosopher.

Many didn't consider Nietzsche a philosopher. Seeing as he was more a writer of prose and aphorisms. I tend to agree...

Existentialism, as long as it is of the sort that 'value is what you make of it', is a rather viable philosophy in my opinion. Objectivism is, as far as I understand, a set of particular adherences within the scope of positivism & materialism; value set in empiricalism; which to an existentalist would be real value as long as the objectivist was sincere.

Runesinger
Sunday, August 9th, 2009, 04:11 PM
Could you elaborate on this?

A short way of describing objectivism is the phrase, "It is what it is." It is the idea that existence is absolute, irregardless of what we think or feel about it.

If you want to get a pretty good summary of the philosophy given by Ayn Rand herself, here's a link.

http://www.aynrand.org/site/PageServer?pagename=objectivism_intro

She was kind of a neo-Aristotelian. She was severely criticized for some parts of her philosophy, which ran counter to some Christian values - not a popular thing in the 1950's.

Nagelfar
Saturday, August 15th, 2009, 11:35 AM
A short way of describing objectivism is the phrase, "It is what it is." It is the idea that existence is absolute, irregardless of what we think or feel about it.

If you want to get a pretty good summary of the philosophy given by Ayn Rand herself, here's a link.

http://www.aynrand.org/site/PageServer?pagename=objectivism_intro

She was kind of a neo-Aristotelian. She was severely criticized for some parts of her philosophy, which ran counter to some Christian values - not a popular thing in the 1950's.

Ah, so you're saying it is "degenerate" based on it's (quite literal antithesis in name to objectivism) "subjectivity", or relativism which can be used toward 'liberal' and hedonistic individual epicurean self-serving ends... I really don't think existentialism results in that so much. I do not yet agree however with existentialism that (at least not in all tenses) "existence precedes essence" but it certainly does in my opinion when we apprehend ontology a posteriori, i.e. existentialism is true only when all is viewed empirically, as value judgements, however I consider man the measure of things a priori and do believe there are definite limits metaphysically where there is no empirical state (if you believe such a thing a possibility, which as one who agrees with objectivism maybe you don't)

My critique of Ayn Rand's "Objectivism" is the ontology I don't see as very philosophical; it says reality is objective, whether we like it or not, but what is it saying is the veracity of truth as a criterion beyond that? Is that claiming a materialism/realism? Then of what type? Naive realism? Dualism? Atomistic/mechanism? Is it deterministic? etc. etc.

Hexenmeister
Saturday, August 15th, 2009, 07:03 PM
Martin Heidegger.
He turned everything upside down and shook it.
He was the magician who pulled us out of our own hats as though previously we had been but sterile rabbits.
After him, nothing was the same.
If you believe in God, put it like this: God said "Heidegger," and then there was light.
No one could foresee his challenge coming. No one who understood his thought could think again in the old automatic way.

Pilgrim
Wednesday, August 19th, 2009, 07:08 AM
Socrates, the greatest of ancient philosophers. Plato.

Also St. Justin Martyr.

Peter Kreeft and William Lane Craig among modern philosophers, as well as Kant who pointed out some of the limitations of studying phenomena. And of course C. S. Lewis.

And hats off to Nietzche for pointing out some terrifying questions that come up in modern thought. I call him "The Mad Prophet".

Sigurd
Wednesday, August 19th, 2009, 12:18 PM
Essentially, we cannot say which philosopher is the greatest overall. For that, philosophers have tackled topics too diverse, you can only measure two philosophers against each other if they have tackled the same strands of philosophy.

Anything else becomes a comparison of apples and oranges, even amongst the same philosophers: We can compare Descartes' cogito ergo sum with Rousseau's Natural Man - but we cannot compare Descartian dualism with Rousseau's Social Contract ... the two are two entirely different things.

Another strand that comes into it, which is philosophical but often hardly comparable with most philosophers is the area of jurisprudence: It can be compared with other forms of social, and moral philosophy - we see that the ideas of Kant, Rousseau, Hobbes, Locke, even Machiavelli, and more anciently Plato, Aristotle, Augustine of Hippo and Aquinas to come into it ... but when comparing to many more modern philosophers such as Nietzsche, it would again be a comparison between Apples and Oranges.

It is this latter field of jurisprudence that I feel I can offer the most conclusive opinion about. I would generally hold Plato and Aquinas to be most important in theory, John Austin and Jeremy Bentham as most important in practice --- but overall, I would find Lon L. Fuller's The Case of the Speluncian Explorers (http://www.nullapoena.de/stud/explorers.html) to be the single most valuable work - even if it is just an article - because it essentially fuelled a new Positivist/Naturalist debate. :)

Pilgrim
Wednesday, August 26th, 2009, 05:00 AM
Just finished reading the book Niccolo's Smile. A fascinating introduction to Niccolo Machiavelli. Read it.

Pictus
Wednesday, July 7th, 2010, 06:22 PM
Oh well, the link seems to be not working here...

Anyway I would have voted either Jacques Derrida or Martin Heidegger. Søren Kierkegaard is also an interesting one, as is Spinoza.

Irby
Wednesday, July 7th, 2010, 06:53 PM
In terms of modern Western thought, we cannot have a discussion without Hegel. All philosophy since Hegel is essentially a reaction to his philosophy. Furthermore, one cannot conceived of modern thought without his dialectical analysis.

Felixmoy
Sunday, March 13th, 2011, 08:52 PM
Sokrates is greatest philosopher ever, who never wrote any of his thoughts, so Plato collected all the fame. He was simple and genius, and died for what he belived. And of course, he was inspiration for Plato who was aloso genius, but complicated too much.

So Sokrates it is.

feisty goddess
Sunday, March 13th, 2011, 09:14 PM
Nietschze :D

Schattenjäger
Sunday, March 13th, 2011, 09:35 PM
That goes to Confucius. He created a practical social framework that assured the racial and cultural survival of the chinese people (and all those who listened to his message) for 3000 years - while all other ancient civilizations have fallen one by one.

wittwer
Monday, March 14th, 2011, 06:59 PM
It's difficult, if not well impossible to establish a "Greatest" Philosopher category. At different times and in different places various Schools of Philosphy have developed to answer the various pressing problems and questions of their day and those of Humanity and not one of them has become the end all. The following is just a sampling:

1. Pre - Socratics
2. Post Socratics, Platonists/Aristotelians/Stoics
3. Medieval School
4. Reniasance School
5. Empirical School
6. German Idealists
7. Pragmatic School
8. Existential School
9. Post - Modern Schools

All of these raise and answer many questions in the fields of Epistlemology, Metaphysics, Socio - Politco - Economics, Law, Theology, Science, etc., etc. thus expanding our knowledge and understanding of ourselves and the world.

So in the interest of the "Love of Knowledge" (Philosophia) one cannot really establish a "Greatest" Category.