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Vanir
Thursday, January 27th, 2005, 05:29 PM
I have been able to become lucid enough to control my dreams several times, but it is actually difficult to stay lucid, it is very easy to drift "back to sleep" again with the flow of the dream.

I found (from my small store of experience) that if you are thinking about lucid dreaming during the day, over a few weeks, it kind of primes your mind to it, making it easier for you to "remember" to awaken within your dream.

I flew about like Peter Pan in my first lucid dream, I remember performing slow floating somersaults from the top of one powerpole to another...

Haven't been focused enough to attain dream lucidity in several years now :( I find I have to work at it. Perhaps some people find it easy, or natural, I don't know.

It is an interesting insight into the way the mind works, and states of consciousness.

Anyway,
enjoy!
Anders.

http://www.lucidity.com/LucidDreamingFAQ2.html

1.1 WHAT IS LUCID DREAMING?

Lucid dreaming means dreaming while knowing that you are dreaming. The term was coined by Frederik van Eeden who used the word "lucid" in the sense of mental clarity. Lucidity usually begins in the midst of a dream when the dreamer realizes that the experience is not occurring in physical reality, but is a dream. Often this realization is triggered by the dreamer noticing some impossible or unlikely occurrence in the dream, such as flying or meeting the deceased. Sometimes people become lucid without noticing any particular clue in the dream; they just suddenly realize they are in a dream. A minority of lucid dreams (according to the research of LaBerge and colleagues, about 10 percent) are the result of returning to REM (dreaming) sleep directly from an awakening with unbroken reflective consciousness.

The basic definition of lucid dreaming requires nothing more than becoming aware that you are dreaming. However, the quality of lucidity can vary greatly. When lucidity is at a high level, you are aware that everything experienced in the dream is occurring in your mind, that there is no real danger, and that you are asleep in bed and will awaken shortly. With low-level lucidity you may be aware to a certain extent that you are dreaming, perhaps enough to fly or alter what you are doing, but not enough to realize that the people are dream representations, or that you can suffer no physical damage, or that you are actually in bed.

Nuovo Vesuvio
Friday, January 28th, 2005, 06:10 PM
Lucid dreaming is cool...it is a bit like remote viewing and astral projecting together, only its not. i can lucid dream...most of the time I choose not to because I have important things I need to find out in my dreams, and I do not achieve that by lucid dreaming.

Of course I can't do it all the time, but you are right, the more you think about it it kind of gears your mind into it. I find good control of my dreams, and have trained myself to wake up at 2am 4am and 6am every day, without alarns or anything. What do/did you want to achieve out of lucid dreaming? Maybe you can try to me your guide or something...

Dr. Solar Wolff
Saturday, January 29th, 2005, 07:49 AM
Lucid dreams may be a little different but I have some experience with something called "rational dreams". My friend Greg knows quite a bit about the Runes, in fact it is his major interest. I asked him to teach me. He sent me a tape of him "breathing" the runes so I would get it right. As with everything, I jumped in all the way and did every rune I could find nine times a day as I was driving to work (long drive). I made progress rapidly but one side effect was always being tired. Greg kept asking about side effects but I didn't think to tell him of simply being tired. Finally, he mentioned the word "dreams" and I really went off. Doing the Runes with this intensity causes a constant flow of dreams. The problem is that these dreams are so intense and real that even after many hours, when you awake, you feel like you have just gone through a war.

Greg told me I was fortunate and now I had to direct these dreams toward specific problems. But my only problem was that I couldn't get a descent night's sleep. These dreams were not sexual or being chased by monsters or anything like that. Once, I explained the Hardy-Weinberg principle to someone in great detail in one of these dreams and it was all correct. It would certainly be possible to direct the dreaming process while doing the Runes and solve problems while sleeping. Perhaps I did this without knowning but my real memory of those times was always being tired. Finally, I had to end the Rune study. Occasionally, to charge-up, I do them. They are also good for putting a sort of electrical force field around yourself in which no psychic mischief can penetrate (Kaballah, etc.).

Vanir
Sunday, January 30th, 2005, 02:37 AM
it is a bit like remote viewing and astral projecting together, only its not There is nothing New Age about Lucid Dreaming. It is another form of mental discipline. That fact that we CAN train ourselves to control our subconscious stream of thought show that we CAN dominate our instincts, and direct our minds, completely and totally, by will.

Will and Control. Nothing spooky here.

Whilst I respect open-mindedness, I have to flat out state that I reject any esoteric or supernatural explanation of Lucid Dreaming or similar. Something is "mysterious" for as long as we don't understand it, it does not mean that an explanation rooted firmly in this physical world is not existent.

IMHO Lucid Dreaming is a very useful tool for exploring and understanding the scope of the power we have over ourselves even on that dark primal level of instinct and emotion.

They're just my feelings on the matter, a lifetime of being bludgeoned with The Horoscope, shamani animals, healing angels & crystals by a Hippy Mother has left me with a raw nerve to anything even vaguely New Age.

Nuovo Vesuvio
Monday, January 31st, 2005, 07:04 PM
I completely agree

Personally, I think nothing is mysterious. Their is no limit to our power, only the limits you put on yourself, usually imposed by modern society. As you grow in a modern skeptical world you are almost forced into believing things which really you shouldn't. Don't listen - do your own thing. And for the non-believers in whatever, one day you will all believe. Once you believe, you can do anything, from 20 A* in your GCSE to being able to fly, not having to sleep, being the next president of America...however I will be a postman in some pacific island while the rest of the world are bombing each other

errm...surprisingly, I have not heard of rational dreams...could you define them wolf?

Hengist Duval
Wednesday, June 1st, 2005, 10:27 PM
Lucid dreaming is great, also I recommend you to keep dream diary, which helps to remember dreams, and so helps you in achieving lucid state.

I personally have managed to do some funny wizardry etc. in those dreams I have been lucid dreaming for years, it is funny and interesting hobby, I recommend it to everyone. :D

fenriSS_
Wednesday, June 1st, 2005, 11:49 PM
I love this. Seems like i'm doing it all the time, somethimes having sex :redface: , jumping of real high mountains(i'v jumped off "gallepiggen"(a norwegian mountain).

Hengist Duval
Wednesday, June 1st, 2005, 11:57 PM
Do you have anytime created landscape? It is fun, though difficult.

Also try doing magic, for example freezing time * or throwing fireball from your hand, it is fun.

Also try looking to sky, it usually has magnificent colours and really beautifull celestial objects. (I once saw ringed giant planet and couple of its moons)

*(I for example freezed time in one dream where I saw some pedophiles trying to hijack some little girl to their car. They were accelerating of but I freezed time and caught them. Then I literally teared their car apart with bare hands, and beated crap off from pedophiles. I throwed one of them for about 100 meters. Nice lucid dream.)

TisaAnne
Thursday, June 2nd, 2005, 12:53 AM
I cannot say that I ever recall having an experience such as the ones mentioned... or if I've had a true lucid dream at all. But, I do sometimes have strange "continual dreaming" (as I call it), which is somewhat similar to this:


A minority of lucid dreams (according to the research of LaBerge and colleagues, about 10 percent) are the result of returning to REM (dreaming) sleep directly from an awakening with unbroken reflective consciousness.
I do not sleep very well, or very much, each night... I usually only get about 2-4 hours of sleep, and even that is very restless and fitful, and I wake up nearly every 20 or so minutes. So with this strange sleep pattern, I often have the same dream for hours. I will fall asleep and instantly, it seems, be transferred into a dreaming situation, yet each time I awake I am able to get right back into the dream at exactly the same place I had left off. I guess I am concious that I am dreaming, because the moment I am awoken, I close my eyes immediately with the thought, and intention, of resuming the dream that was occuring... and I am successful. I always remember my dreams completely, as well... they are very vivid, and realistic, and mostly they are set in past situations with people I have encountered in my life... They don't really seem like dreams at all, just interactive memories.

What I am wondering, though, is this: Is my ability to sustain one of my dreams throughout the whole duration that I am 'sleeping' a characteristic of this so-called lucid dream state?

Hengist Duval
Thursday, June 2nd, 2005, 01:03 AM
Kind of lucid dreaming I'd say. I usually cannot continue same dream, without directly concentrating hardly on it.

Lucid dreams usually have very life like appearance, though they can be distinguished from reality from couple of things: First things not possible in reality (for example you can fly or do magic), second things working in reality not working (clocks, light switches, computers etc..)

anonymaus
Thursday, June 2nd, 2005, 01:13 AM
I have experimented with this in the past with some success. I used the "red elastic" technique, where one creates an unusual addition one's person in order to have a reference point in the dream that it is, in fact, a dream. This allows a greater opportunity to awaken inside the dream without disturbing the state.

I also, occasionally, achieve lucidity without any premeditation on my part.. I am aware of it only peripherally as it happens, but I am able to exercise control over my dreams from time to time.

I haven't much interested in delving further as I have enough trouble keeping my waking mind balanced ;)

Hengist Duval
Thursday, June 2nd, 2005, 01:22 AM
My lucids are usually started when I find some unrealistic thing(for example meeting long dead relatives)from which I find that I'm dreaming.

Then I take control of dream and start doing various things, sadly time in lucid state is quite limited.

Arcturus
Friday, June 3rd, 2005, 12:37 PM
I have tried this on and off for many years now, but it is very seldom I manage to "awake" within my dream and STAY that way. I can take control of my dream but 90% of the time it ends with me drifting into conciousness(too much brain activity to stay asleep?) and waking up. The waking-up process is in these cases always the same; I don't *snap* wake up, but find myself drifting into conciousness, first becoming aware of blankets, pillow, light, room... all very slow and gradual.

Side-note: in wet dreams I ALWAYS wake up at some point before penetration, even in lucid ones, either someone or something wakes me or I wake up by myself. Really frustrating at times... :redface:

perkele14
Friday, June 3rd, 2005, 06:49 PM
Side-note: in wet dreams I ALWAYS wake up at some point before penetration, even in lucid ones, either someone or something wakes me or I wake up by myself. Really frustrating at times... :redface:

I believe it is not frustrating when you wake up BY someone... :O(of course depending on WHO wakes you up and in which way :laugh: )

Arcturus
Friday, June 3rd, 2005, 06:55 PM
Indeed. As someone said; "Its not a matter of finding someone you want to go to bed with, but someone you want to wake up next to."

Then again, that also depends on who you are :D

Vanir
Saturday, June 4th, 2005, 12:32 PM
I have tried this on and off for many years now, but it is very seldom I manage to "awake" within my dream and STAY that way. I can take control of my dream but 90% of the time it ends with me drifting into conciousness(too much brain activity to stay asleep?) and waking up. The waking-up process is in these cases always the same; I don't *snap* wake up, but find myself drifting into conciousness, first becoming aware of blankets, pillow, light, room... all very slow and gradual.

Yes, I find it hard to maintain a grip on control (or lucidity) once I attain the state. Melting back into the flow of the dream, or the dream-state, is very hard to stop in my experience. I don't awaken though like you do usually, though it does happen. Probably conscious brain patterns interrupting REM sleep brain patterns or something.


Side-note: in wet dreams I ALWAYS wake up at some point before penetration, even in lucid ones, either someone or something wakes me or I wake up by myself. Really frustrating at times... :redface:

Far Canal you make me laugh!

As for recurring dreams, or theme dreams, I have those too.
There are the dreams where I can't run, move or get away. Co-ordinating the act of running is impossible, I remember trying to drag myself along the road by my fingernails in such dreams, ripping and tearing them in the process.

Then there are the dreams where I am uncatchable and unkillable. I can outrun cars and dodge bullets (like Miles Teg in Dune or something) I like those dreams :D

I dunno, I can't turn my mind off sometimes, not even when I'm sleeping.

Arcturus
Saturday, June 4th, 2005, 04:32 PM
Recurring dreams used to plague me when I was 5-7 years old. Usually it was a large rock at our summer cottage (quite reminiscent of Obelix's menhir) that began rolling down the rock beach in slow motion and toward my little brother who was playing by the water. Another theme has been falling, but never from anywhere or towards something, just plain falling in a black abyss. Many times these dreams ned with me realizing there will be no bottom and so I can take control of the falling, leading to flight (or the illusion of such, or at least weightlessness; hard to say in a space with no top or bottom...:D).

Nowadays a recurring theme is my teeth falling out... just plain falling out; no pain, no blood, they just feel loose and when touched fall out.. These dreams always feel VERY real, and the physical sensation is 100% realistic. Strange.

White Iceland
Saturday, June 11th, 2005, 07:04 PM
I have natural lucid dreams a few times a month.

The most common scenario is that I am in a fight with someone and my punches are soft or slow and not having the desired effect. After a few of these weak, useless punches, I realize that I am in a dream...

I usually use this knowledge first to make my attacks effective, to provide myself with a gun or baseball bat and to generally FSU...

Loki
Saturday, June 11th, 2005, 07:20 PM
I had a lucid dream last night. :) I can't remember much of it now, but I remember that I "became aware" during my dream, and began to control it. It was kind of pleasant, and I woke up feeling refreshed.

Hans
Tuesday, June 28th, 2005, 02:42 AM
I’ve had a few lucid dreams. I would say at the rate of one every two months…more or less. I will be in a dream and something, I don’t always know what, will trigger my mind into thinking that hey…I’m dreaming!

The hard part is questioning yourself to realize it is a dream. The only way I can describe it would be like walking down the street on a normal day and suddenly having the thought you might be dreaming. If it is a perfectly normal day, how many times would you question yourself like this? That is why I think makes them rare for me.

Of course when I know I’m dreaming…typical male behavior…I bang the first woman I meet! No kidding, what else is there to do? It is so fun because I’m so paranoid about STD’s and stuff and here, no condom…woohoo!

I have notice that during my lucid dreams, I am unable to break the laws of physics…meaning I have actually TRIED to fly and was unable too.

This goes for all dreams: I have also noticed that while in real life I am not afraid of heights, that while I am dreaming, I am terrified of heights. I have flying dreams very rarely but when I do, I’m scared to fly more than ten feet off of the ground. I think it might be because I don’t trust my “flying power” and might fall at some point.

I’ve noticed many of my regular dreams have someone chasing me and I am regularly put into “MacGyver” type scenarios. Not exactly a nightmare but it gets to blood flowing…when I wake up it is always, thank God that is over.

I also have dreams where I get into a fight and I am unable to punch hard. What is that about…like trying to fist fight under water.

Hatewolf
Monday, January 2nd, 2006, 08:38 PM
I've already had lucid dreams in my early childhood, for example I could fly or end a dream wenever it got too scary. Of course I was not aware of the fact that this were lucid dreams, but dreams have always been something very fascinating for me.

When I first read an article on lucid dreaming, I noticed a lot of similarities to my dream experiences, so I started to find out more about this topic.

I started to practice the techniques to induce lucid dreams (keeping a dream diary, doing reality-checks etc.) and after a while I started to have more and more lucid dreams.

I think lucid dreaming is nothing "mysterious", it is just an ability wich everyone can learn, it is a great way to learn more about yourself, and it can of course be a lot of fun.

I think the book "Exploring the world of lucid dreaming" by Stephen LaBerge is a quite good introduction to this very interesting topic.

Dropkick
Wednesday, October 18th, 2006, 12:56 AM
A good dream is like going on a great holiday/adventure. When you wake up you feel great!



This goes for all dreams: I have also noticed that while in real life I am not afraid of heights, that while I am dreaming, I am terrified of heights.

I also have dreams where I get into a fight and I am unable to punch hard. What is that about…like trying to fist fight under water.
These things also happen me! I get very frightened in my dreams but in real life I'm not at all like that.

I've also had a vicious fight with knives in my dreams once. Nobody gets killed but theres always plenty of blood.

cerebro
Friday, October 20th, 2006, 02:43 AM
Of course when I know I’m dreaming…typical male behavior…I bang the first woman I meet! No kidding, what else is there to do?


:thumbup LOL! That´s what I usually do when I realise I´m dreaming!!




I have notice that during my lucid dreams, I am unable to break the laws of physics…meaning I have actually TRIED to fly and was unable too.


In my case I have 2 kinds of lucid dreams. In one case I can fly and jump high and things like that. In the other case I can´t run fast when they are after me, and I can´t punch hard, exactly as you said, like trying to run or fight under water. But this things also happens in normal dreams for me.

Another common thing is dreaming that I´m swimming under water and cannot breath or swim correctly.