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Erlingr Hįrbaršarson
Friday, May 6th, 2005, 10:11 PM
Strong vocabulary can help one conclude favourable in arguments and debatte; an important aspect of being a patriot, especially when you argue with liberals and kommies. This is every ones thread, so please make postings of good words here under company of a brief and a coherent, not overelabourated, definition of this word:

For native english speakers
sempiternal: my wordbook says this is an adjective and means ever-going or inifinite. You say this as: the blood of christ is said to be sempiternal.

For non-native english speakers
unprecedented: ok, this is an adjective and this words means "never-before-been-done". One should use it as this: Asbjųrn won the goldcup an unprecedented eight times. You need to put "an" before it when you say this; every example I have found uses it this way.

anonymaus
Friday, May 6th, 2005, 10:25 PM
infinitesimal: "immeasurably or incalculably small". 'Tis a mathematics term, but well-suited for regular speech.

Example: "The distance between two quarks is infinitesimal."

One of my favourite words, it is a rather polite way of exclaiming how pitiable ones opponent is by proclaiming his knowledge on the subject of debate to be infinitesimal ;)

Erlingr Hįrbaršarson
Friday, May 6th, 2005, 10:31 PM
infinitesimal: "immeasurably or incalculably small". 'Tis a mathematics term, but well-suited for regular speech.

Example: "The distance between two quarks is infinitesimal."

One of my favourite words, it is a rather polite way of exclaiming how pitiable ones opponent is by proclaiming his knowledge on the subject of debate to be infinitesimal ;)

Thanks. And what are quarks?

Every one should try to use new words at the forum for practise before using them in arguments in the real world. Opponents wil oft strategise for their next move according with what words you use to explain your point. So, choosing a specialised arsenall of words could perhaps even allow it to seem that you won the argument, when enfact you did not. :D

anonymaus
Friday, May 6th, 2005, 10:42 PM
And what are quarks?

A Quark is a generalized term for any of a group of small elementary particles - sub-atomic particles, that is. Essentially, they are the building blocks of the building blocks of matter.

Not much use for debate, but interesting nonetheless ;)

Death and the Sun
Saturday, May 7th, 2005, 04:06 PM
:D eldritch [ ldrch ] = Strange or unearthly; eerie.

HIM
Sunday, May 8th, 2005, 10:45 PM
And what are quarks?



Just like protons and neutrons combine to create the nucleus of an atom, quarks combine to form protons and neutrons as well as other fundamental particles. Like protons and neutrons, quarks also have a particular charge. However instead of whole charges, they have charges based on fractions of a third. For example, two "up" quarks each with a +2/3 charge and one "down" quark with a -1/3 charge make a proton. Likewise, two "down" quarks and one "up" quark make a neutron. Quarks come in six varieties: up, down, strange, charmed, bottom and top. The top quark was just assumed to exist until its actual discovery in 1994. Each of these six quarks also come in a particular "color." Either red, green or blue. Furthermore, every quark has an anti-quark partner giving us a grand total of 36 different quarks. The universe is thought to have consisted of a sea of quarks during the first 3 minutes after the Big Bang before the universe was cool enough for the quarks to "freeze" into protons, neutrons, and other particles. Quarks were once thought to be the most elementary building blocks of nature, but M-theory now suggests that quarks my be made up of incredibly tiny vibrating strings called "superstrings."

Nįttfari
Sunday, May 8th, 2005, 10:52 PM
:sofa0000:

Erlingr Hįrbaršarson
Sunday, May 8th, 2005, 11:33 PM
:sofa0000:

...next word please. :102st:

Carrion: this is decaying flesh and a Cadaver: is the dead corpse of a foreigner who may be dissected for experiments in the name of "sciences".

newenstad
Monday, May 9th, 2005, 12:24 AM
Swing low,... :flynch:

Erlingr Hįrbaršarson
Monday, May 9th, 2005, 10:27 AM
Swing low,... :flynch:

I do not understand.

Death and the Sun
Monday, May 9th, 2005, 02:06 PM
Dearth (noun)

Pronunciation: ['dźrth]

Definition: A severe lack or shortage of something.

Usage: A "paucity" of something suggests that only a few exist while a "dearth" implies a severe shortage, almost a complete lack of it.

Suggested Usage: This is a word that is very useful in discussing sports: "Given the dearth of shots on goal in the game, even the one score surprises me." It also comes in handy around the house: "Since we all are displaying such a dearth of ambition today, why don't we just stay home and watch TV tonight?"

Etymology: Middle English derthe, from Old English *dorthu "costliness", from dore "costly", Modern English dear "expensive." From the PIE root *dhor(g)- also found in Serbian drag and Russian dorogyj "dear, expensive."

–Dr. Language, YourDictionary.com

newenstad
Monday, May 9th, 2005, 07:50 PM
Swing low, sweet chariot coming for to carry me home...

famous song in England


Swing low, sweet carrion...

:redface:

Erlingr Hįrbaršarson
Monday, May 9th, 2005, 08:18 PM
Swing low, sweet chariot coming for to carry me home...

famous song in England


Swing low, sweet carrion...

:redface:

I see now; thank you for explaining. No needs for red face as twas I who failed to understand this. :)

Nįttfari
Monday, May 9th, 2005, 08:30 PM
av·id: 1 : desirous to the point of greed : urgently eager : <avid for publicity>
2 : characterized by enthusiasm and vigorous pursuit <avid readers>

- av·id·ly adverb (I have been reading this book avidly.)

Erlingr Hįrbaršarson
Wednesday, August 3rd, 2005, 03:09 PM
CONSTANTINUS

You have written the word heterogenic in a posting shortly ago. Could you please define and provide an example of this word in common usage, so those who do not know it can become familiar with it? Thanks. [I am not familiar with this word at all, so 'twill be as well educational to me.]

Blood_Axis
Wednesday, August 3rd, 2005, 03:18 PM
CONSTANTINUS

You have written the word heterogenic in a posting shortly ago. Could you please define and provide an example of this word in common usage, so those who do not know it can become familiar with it? Thanks. [I am not familiar with this word at all, so 'twill be as well educational to me.]
Heterogenic is a word of greek origin, hence I can briefly explain the etymology for you ;)

It comes from the word "heteros" which means "other, different" and the word "genos" which means "kind, kin, genre"...

Hence, it literally means "of different kind".

The word heterogenic should depict, therefore, a situation where diversity, incompatibility and difference exists. Although I would have to know the context in which Constantinus used this word, to give you its exact connotation ;)

Erlingr Hįrbaršarson
Wednesday, August 3rd, 2005, 03:38 PM
Heterogenic is a word of greek origin, hence I can briefly explain the etymology for you ;)

It comes from the word "heteros" which means "other, different" and the word "genos" which means "kind, kin, genre"...

Hence, it literally means "of different kind". Thank you.


The word heterogenic should depict, therefore, a situation where diversity, incompatibility and difference exists. Although I would have to know the context in which Constantinus used this word, to give you its exact connotation ;)
'Twas regarding slavs and how one can not justifiably labell them under but one term.

Blood_Axis
Wednesday, August 3rd, 2005, 03:47 PM
Thank you.

Anytime! Glad I could help :)


'Twas regarding slavs and how one can not justifiably labell them under but one term.

Obviously then he meant that Slavs are diverse and not belonging to one kind alone, thus not easily classifiable under one term. Correct me if I am wrong, Constantinus. :)

Constantinus
Wednesday, August 3rd, 2005, 06:43 PM
You're correct there BA.

I don't have much to add to what you said.

lei.talk
Saturday, August 27th, 2005, 11:55 PM
to improve the vocabulary
of the kids that work with me
(in preparation for their s.a.t.),
i use the remnants of an old board-game.

it was named "800"
and promised to familiarise the player
with all the words present
in the scholastic aptitude test.

the container is long gone,
the folding-board and cards are in tatters,
so, if any one finds a source
- please, let me know.

Erlingr Hįrbaršarson
Sunday, August 28th, 2005, 01:34 AM
Tatter [noun] -
" 1. A torn and hanging piece of cloth; a shred."
" 2. (tatters) Torn and ragged clothing; rags."

Also a verb as in to tatter. My wordbook says it is "to make or become ragged".

HIM
Sunday, August 28th, 2005, 01:45 AM
Tatter [noun] -
" 1. A torn and hanging piece of cloth; a shred."
" 2. (tatters) Torn and ragged clothing; rags."

Also a verb as in to tatter. My wordbook says it is "to make or become ragged".

Ah yes. For example, one could say: my shirt has become old and tattered.

Erlingr Hįrbaršarson
Sunday, August 28th, 2005, 02:06 AM
Ah yes. For example, one could say: my shirt has become old and tattered.

Thank you, H.I.M. Examples are always welcomed. Please enter another insightful word, so we all can expand our vocabularies.

HIM
Sunday, August 28th, 2005, 02:41 AM
Webster's definition:


Main Entry: gre&#183;gar&#183;i&#183;ous
Pronunciation: gri-'gar-E-&s, -'ger-
Function: adjective
Etymology: Latin gregarius of a flock or herd, from greg-, grex flock, herd
1 a : tending to associate with others of one's kind : SOCIAL b : marked by or indicating a liking for companionship : SOCIABLE c : of or relating to a social group

Here's a couple examples of the word in use:

-He likes to go to parties because he is very friendly and gregarious.

-Nords are quite gregarious folk. :D

lei.talk
Sunday, August 28th, 2005, 03:28 AM
some persons found their writings persuasive,
but the personal repellance of the authors
did vitiate their arguments beyond consideration. (http://www.forums.skadi.net/showpost.php?p=109449&postcount=4)vi·ti·ate

etymology: latin vitiatus, past participle of vitiare, from vitium (fault or vice)

transitive verb: vi·ti·at·ed, vi·ti·at·ing, vi·ti·ates
adjective: vi·ti·able
noun: vi·ti·a·tion
noun: vi·ti·a·tor

1) to reduce the value
or impair the quality of: a mind vitiated by prejudice

2) to make ineffective
or invalidate: fraud vitiates a contract

TisaAnne
Sunday, August 28th, 2005, 04:10 AM
Some time ago, whilst looking up the origins of the word "thorp" (which means a hamlet; or small villiage), I came across a page on Wikipedia that had a list of English words of Old Norse origin... I really found it interesting - and surprising - how many of some of the most commonly used English words are rooted in Old Norse. For example: bag, gift, their, they, anger, take, talk, ugly, etc.

For anyone who is interested in some of these words, here's the link (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_words_of_Old_Norse_origi n). :)

_______

And for my entry, here's one of my most favorite words, which doesn't seem to be used as commonly as it ought to be:

hinterland

Main Entry: hin·ter·land
Pronunciation: 'hin-t&r-"land, -l&nd
Function: noun
Etymology: German, from hinter hinder + Land
1 - a region lying inland from a coast
2 - a: a region remote from urban areas. b: a region lying beyond major metropolitan or cultural centers

lei.talk
Sunday, September 11th, 2005, 07:27 AM
catalytic influence is unlikely,
if you use some thing
like this
as your screen-saver at work. (http://www.forums.skadi.net/showpost.php?p=119325&postcount=12)cat&#183;a&#183;lyt&#183;ic

etymology: Greek katalutikos (able to dissolve), from katalusis (dissolution)

transitive verb: cat&#183;a&#183;lyze
adjective: cat&#183;a&#183;lyt&#183;ic
adverb: cat&#183;a&#183;lyt&#183;i&#183;cal&#183;ly
noun: cat&#183;a&#183;ly&#183;sis
noun: cat&#183;a&#183;lyst

A catalyst (greek: καταλύτης, catalytis) is a substance
that accelerates the rate of change
without itself being transformed
or consumed by that change:

leslie orgel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leslie_Orgel) suggested that rna did act as a catalyst
based upon findings
that it can form complex secondary structures (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secondary_structure).

in the "rna world hypothesis (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RNA_world_hypothesis)",
walter gilbert (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Gilbert) proposes:

in the past, the cell (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cell_%28biology%29) used rna (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RNA) as both the genetic material
and the structural and catalytic molecule,
instead of dividing these functions between dna (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DNA) and protein (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Protein)
as they are in modern cells.