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Todesritter
Tuesday, April 26th, 2005, 05:29 PM
Exposed: The Top Ten Diet Fallacies -And The Truth to Set You Free

By Ori Hofmekler, author of The Warrior Diet (http://forums.skadi.net/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.drag ondoor.com%2Fb23.html)


Diet Fallacy #1. BREAKFAST is the most important meal of the day

When you wake-up, your body is already in an intense detox mode, clearing itself of endotoxins and digestive waste from the past evening meal. During the morning hours, when digestion is fully completed (while you are on an empty stomach), a primal survival mechanism, known as fight or flight reaction to stress, is triggered, maximizing your body's capacity to generate energy, be alert, resist fatigue and resist stress.

This highly geared survival mode is primarily dominated by part of the autonomic nervous system known as the SNS (sympathetic nervous system). At that state, the body is in its most energy-producing phase and that's when most energy comes from fat burning. All that happens when you do not eat the typical morning meal.

If however you follow what "normal guys" do and eat your morning bagel and cereal and egg & bacon, you'll most likely shut down the above energy producing system. The SNS and its fight or flight mechanism will be substantially suppressed. Instead, your morning meal will trigger an antagonistic part of the automatic nervous system known as the PSNS (Para sympathetic nervous system), which makes you sleepy, slow and less resilient to fatigue and stress.

Instead of spending energy and burning fat, your body will be more geared towards storing energy and gaining fat. Under this state, detox would be inhibited. The overall metabolic stress would increase with toxins accumulating in the liver, giving the body another substantial reason to gain fat. (Fat tissues serve as a biological storage for toxins)

The overall suppressing effects of morning meals, can lead to energy crashes during the daily (working) hours, often with chronic cravings for pick-up foods, sweets, coffee and tobacco. Eating at the wrong time, would severely interrupt the body's ability to be in tune with the circadian clock. The human body has never adapted to such interruptions. We are primarily pre-programmed to rotate between the two autonomic nervous system parts: the daily SNS and
the nightly PSNS.

The SNS regulates alertness and action during the day, while PSNS regulates relaxation, digestion and sleep during the nightly hours. Any interruption in this primal daily cycle, may lead into sleepiness during the day followed by sleeping disorders at night. Morning meals must be carefully designed not to suppress the SNS and its highly energetic state. Minimizing morning food intake to fruits, veggie soup or small amounts of fresh light protein foods, such as poached or boiled eggs, plain yogurt, or white cheese, will maintain the body in an undereating phase, while promoting the SNS with its energy producing properties.

*Note: Athletes who exercise in the morning should turn breakfast into a post-exercise recovery meal. Such meals should consist of small amounts of fresh protein plus carbs such as yogurt and banana, eggs plus a bowl of oatmeal, or cottage cheese with berries.

An insulin spike is necessary for effectively finalizing the anabolic actions of GH and IGF1 after exercise. Nonetheless, after the initial recovery meal, it's highly recommended to maintain the body in an undereating phase by minimizing daily carb intake in the following meals. Applying small protein meals (minimum carbs) every couple of hours will keep sustaining the SNS during the daily hours while providing amino acids for protein synthesis in the muscle
tissues, promoting a long lasting anabolic effect after exercise.

In conclusion, breakfast isn't the most important meal of the day. The most important meals are post-exercise recovery meals. Saying that, for a WARRIOR every meal is a recovery meal helping to recuperate from either nutritional stress (undereating) or physical stress (exercise). It's when you eat that makes what you eat matter.

Freja
Tuesday, April 26th, 2005, 06:53 PM
Interesting! I`ve been cutting down on carbs ever since all the low-carb diets became the latest thing. I can now better feel how my body reacts to refined carbohydrates, which has led me to believe that our bodies are less developed than we might think. The idea that we function much like we did in the stone-age might not be so farfetched after all.
I have often wondered why I feel so much more focused on the mornings I`ve skipped breakfast. It has even taken me longer to get hungry than if I eat a "normal" breakfast.

anonymaus
Tuesday, April 26th, 2005, 07:05 PM
I have been like this my entire life.. naturally.. sunday brunch was the only time I ever ate "breakfast".

In the winter I would eat a japanese soup in the morning called Osuimono, it's Miso broth with dried mushrooms, onions, etc--and in the summer, some yoghurt. My body seems to reject most foods if I eat them before being awake 3-4hrs first.

Very interesting article!


our bodies are less developed than we might think

There is plenty of truth to that claim, and the amount of dairy most people can tolerate is a good example; our bodies just aren't designed for massive dairy consumption in adult life, and certainly not from animals other than humans.

I've always found it strange that humans were so big on dairy, it seems a bit out of place now.. given that we have vitamin supplements and whatnot; seems unnecessary. As unnecessary as drinking the blood of our enemies for the vitamines and iron supplement, like some of the South American tribes used to :P

Then again, milk is great :D

TisaAnne
Tuesday, April 26th, 2005, 07:17 PM
Interesting! I`ve been cutting down on carbs ever since all the low-carb diets became the latest thing. I can now better feel how my body reacts to refined carbohydrates, which has led me to believe that our bodies are less developed than we might think.
I never really warmed up to the whole low-carb thing... It just seems too restrictive to me, I guess. My diet is almost entirely supported with carbs, more so of the complex variety - fiberous vegetables, brown rice, fruits, grains, whole-wheat breads, etc. And Potatoes!!! I could not survive without an abundance of potatoes in my life! :D

As for breakfast - I have never really eaten it regularly. Even as a young child I didn't like to eat breakfast. It's not that I don't like traditional breakfast-type foods, it's that I'm just not hungry in the morning.

Though on occasion, I will have a piece of fruit or a glass of milk, and sometimes oatmeal (I loooovvvee oatmeal!)... but that's about it, and very rarely.

Náttfari
Tuesday, April 26th, 2005, 07:20 PM
I can drink a litre of milk and feel great...

TisaAnne
Tuesday, April 26th, 2005, 07:24 PM
I can drink a litre of milk and feel great...
I'm the same way, except I don't really drink that much at one time. :icon12:

I regularly consume a lot of dairy products - milk, yogurt, cheese, butter, sour cream, curds & whey, etc., And I've never experienced any adverse health effects, or weight gain.

I'm not complaining though... :)

anonymaus
Tuesday, April 26th, 2005, 07:51 PM
Nor am I, I have dairy 2-3 times a day and I love it.. I've never had problems digesting it, but it does seem odd to me that we ingest it. Odd and delicious ;)

Erlingr Hárbarđarson
Tuesday, April 26th, 2005, 09:44 PM
In the morningtime, I jump out from bed like a naked lightning bolt and instead of drinking milk, I just run into the fields naked and screaming and then chase the cows untill I catch one and eat it. The mooooooooooore milk is the better. :rofl:

anonymaus
Tuesday, April 26th, 2005, 09:44 PM
In the morningtime, I jump out from bed like a naked lightning bolt and instead of drinking milk, I just run into the fields naked and screaming and then chase the cows untill I catch one and eat it. The mooooooooooore milk is the better. :rofl:

This is a hilarious mental image. :rotfl:

ChrisDownUnder
Sunday, May 1st, 2005, 10:02 AM
At that state, the body is in its most energy-producing
phase and that's when most energy comes from fat burning. All that
happens when you do not eat the typical morning meal.That's why performing aerobic exercise to burn fat is best done in the morning, on an empty stomach. Personally I seem to have little energy in the mornings, and prefer to exercise in the late afternoon or early evenings, when energy levels seem much better.

I would recommend not skipping breakfast entirely though, particularly if you are trying to gain lean body weight. If you haven't eaten for 8 hours at night (breakfast = 'break the fast') whilst asleep, a meal is needed to prevent the body being in a catabolic (muscle-breakdown) state. I usually have a morning meal of oatmeal, eggs, fruit or some bread, but not a particularly large meal.


Nonetheless, after the initial recovery meal, it's highly recommended to maintain the body in an undereating phase by minimizing daily carb intake in the following meals. Applying small protein meals (minimum carbs) every couple of hours will keep sustaining the SNS during the daily hours while providing amino acids for protein synthesis in the muscle tissues, promoting a long lasting anabolic effect after exercise.

The most important meals are post-exercise recovery meals.Yes I usually have a large protein drink with egg whites immediately after training, and smaller protein-based meals every couple of hours after that.

Restricting carbs too much I think will sap you of the energy needed for high-intensity training sessions. So I would suggest including carbs with proteins (maybe as a side dish - like rice, pasta, or potatoes) with most meals, excluding the last 2 or 3 meals before bedtime. ;)

Todesritter
Sunday, May 1st, 2005, 10:56 AM
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I don’t personally believe this guys approach 100%, but viewed it as a useful distinct approach to illustrate why others should not just believe the standard recommendations – so I went ahead and posted it.

The German/Scottish branch of my family, from the Midwest farmland area of America, typically ate huge breakfasts at about 6:30 in the morning, but they had the muscle and body size to burn this, and had been up since 4:15 doing farm chores on an empty stomach. So they have earned their few thousand calorie breakfast.

Farmers from this background don’t need steroids, or even to life weights, as they do it all day, in their daily lives. You should see the size of the forearms on my relatives, or their neighbors.

However, modern life, where many of us now work in offices all day, we need to artificially create some regimen to reproduce the positive stress we are missing – what allowed our ancestors to become strong enough to survive conditions that were much more harsh than today.

Your regimen sounds good/healthy for you, as you have and awareness of your energy levels – most mistakes made by people who are not under heavy training, come from just not being aware of themselves, and realizing that they could be feeling better. Us dumb Americans for instance, have television tell us to take a pill if our headache gets bad enough, rather than to drink some water and sleep a little more.

My grandfather who is in his 80’s and just went back to work teaching school because he was bored, can still throw a refrigerator across the yard. He swears by his Oatmeal breakfast – though he’s been off the farm, and in the Air Force, or police, or teaching children at school most of his life now.

Dr. Solar Wolff
Wednesday, October 5th, 2005, 04:47 AM
Ori Hofmekler is an Israeli interested in selling books. The shock factor is important to further his end. There is no "warrior diet" in the emperical sense, warriors from all over the world all eat different things at different times so that the "warrior" has nothing to do with diet, nor does muscle, really. What Hofmekler says may have something to do with fat accumulation, though.

Dorpmuller
Monday, October 17th, 2005, 10:10 PM
Ori Hofmekler is an Israeli interested in selling books. The shock factor is important to further his end. There is no "warrior diet" in the emperical sense, warriors from all over the world all eat different things at different times so that the "warrior" has nothing to do with diet, nor does muscle, really. What Hofmekler says may have something to do with fat accumulation, though.

Keeping this in mind from an NS point of view, maybe that's why I feel like crap when I wake up... never have been able to keep breakfast down. I have to be up for at least a couple hours before I can eat.

Rich