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DreamWalker
Thursday, April 21st, 2005, 06:09 AM
I kept seeing these large hawks flying around and thought "I wonder where their nest is?" Duh. It is in my backyard, ha. :dork0000:

I think they are Osprey, a mostly fish-eating hawk, I have to do some serious chainsaw work over the next few weeks cutting up some dead/fallen trees, and then burning them, I hope all this does not scare them off. :frown:

http://www.friendsofblackwater.org/osprey.html

The Horned God
Thursday, April 21st, 2005, 09:15 AM
A beautiful bird, you are fortunate to live in a part of the world where you can see wildlife like that every day.

When I was a small child, one Sunday morning having been brought to the pub after mass by my parents, I overheard a friend of my father's telling how he had recently shot an osprey.Now, at that time I thought of the Osprey as being a fearsome carnivorous bird, so for the next several years I held this man in high regard and referred to him from then on as "the man who shot the Osprey".

Of course, ospreys are harmless to humans and are near extinct in Ireland, and since they are vulnerable only to foxes and dogs, they are extremly easy to shoot, as they are rarly on their guard.

It later transpired that that particular osprey was quite an important bird, it bore a ring-tag on its leg and when it was handed over to the authoraties it was found that it was a Scotish osprey which was part of a breeding program in western Scotland and had been blown off course and ended up in Ireland.
The Osprey is an endangered species in both Ireland and Scotland and shooting one is little to be proud of.
The man in question shot the Osprey quite by mistake, he and the Osprey were both after the same phesant when the accident occured, or so he said.
In hindsight "the man who shot the osprey is not such an inspiring character, thus can childhood heros lose their majesty when viewed with the slightly deeper insight of adulthood.
If my post has a point to it, then it is that.

Stig NHF
Thursday, April 21st, 2005, 12:28 PM
Hehe, a bittersweet post. Just the way I like it :)

Mistress Klaus
Thursday, April 21st, 2005, 12:46 PM
I kept seeing these large hawks flying around and thought "I wonder where their nest is?" Duh. It is in my backyard, ha. :dork0000:

I think they are Osprey, a mostly fish-eating hawk, I have to do some serious chainsaw work over the next few weeks cutting up some dead/fallen trees, and then burning them, I hope all this does not scare them off. :frown:

http://www.friendsofblackwater.org/osprey.html

Are the dead trees close to their nest?

Allenson
Thursday, April 21st, 2005, 02:22 PM
It does look like an Osprey to me as well.... We have many of them on the lakes and rivers around my region. I love to watch them dive into the water only to emerge shortly after with a perch in their talons! :)

Volkert Volkertsen
Thursday, April 21st, 2005, 04:25 PM
We had a family of redtailed hawks in the yard last year. I was surprised that they roosted so close to the house, but there they were. They nested in a small stand of spruce and popped out every once in a while to prey on the ground critters that congregate around the apple trees and the grape vine.

It was fun watching the young ones mature as their hunting/flying skills developed and their coloration changed.

TisaAnne
Thursday, April 21st, 2005, 06:47 PM
You are very fortunate, DreamWalker, to have such a wonderfully noble creature nesting in your yard.

Osprey's, and most predatory birds in general, are so interesting and captivating... it is especially nice to be able to witness them in their natural element.

In the region that I live, we have many Bald Eagles and hawks too... Nearly every time I am fishing at my favorite lake, I spot an eagle gliding through the air or swooping across the water, ascending with it's prize in talon. They nest in the tall pines and rock faces that line water's edge. I think that I spend more time bird-watching than I do fishing. :D

The only downside I have found with these birds is that my cats fall victim to their predatory ways... I have lost 6 cats in the past 2 1/2 years and the birds, both Eagle and Hawk, are the cause of this. But, 'tis the way of nature...

DreamWalker
Friday, April 22nd, 2005, 02:01 AM
Are the dead trees close to their nest?

Yes, very. But it is a tall tree, a Greater Fir probably 250-300 ft (75-90 meters) high.

I have been working in the yard on and off for a couple of months, and it does not seemed to have bothered them. I even used the chainsaw about a month ago, but he/they may have still been migrating at that time. Perhaps I will do a bare minimum with a hand saw and wait untill fall after they migrate south to do the rest.

The fallen dead trees are really a dense mess, on top of each other, and slowing the new growth somewhat, it would be nice to get them out, but nicer to have 2 hawks. :viking3:

DreamWalker
Friday, April 22nd, 2005, 02:22 AM
You are very fortunate, DreamWalker, to have such a wonderfully noble creature nesting in your yard.

Osprey's, and most predatory birds in general, are so interesting and captivating... it is especially nice to be able to witness them in their natural element.

In the region that I live, we have many Bald Eagles and hawks too... Nearly every time I am fishing at my favorite lake, I spot an eagle gliding through the air or swooping across the water, ascending with it's prize in talon. They nest in the tall pines and rock faces that line water's edge. I think that I spend more time bird-watching than I do fishing. :D

The only downside I have found with these birds is that my cats fall victim to their predatory ways... I have lost 6 cats in the past 2 1/2 years and the birds, both Eagle and Hawk, are the cause of this. But, 'tis the way of nature...

Sorry to hear about your cats, I love cats. But I am not sure a domesticated cat still has the instincts to defend itself against Hawks/Eagles, so maybe not totally the way of nature.

I have hordes of deer, they come through dozens of times a day on their way down to the lake and then back up the hill, but the only other wildlife I have seeen are large wild Turkeys and a bear. I have wondered why there are no squirrels, rabbits, rodents, etc, around, I guess now I know. :cool: It would be a good place for a garden I expect, what with 2 large hawks above protecting it against pests! :viking3:

I was outside this afternoon and heard "Hawkish" noises and finally looked up and there were three of them! One was chasing another out of the nest and another was arriving, probably the male chasing away another male who wanted his lady and home, and then the female came back to the nest? The tree is too tall to see much detail about the birds or their nest :confused: .

http://www.friendsofblackwater.org/osprey.html

DreamWalker
Thursday, May 26th, 2005, 07:05 AM
The Osprey are still here, they seem to have at least one newly-hatched little one. Last weekend was rainy but the two before were warm with the boats, jet-skis, etc on the lake, clods with their noisy Harleys touring around, etc, no problem for the birds apparently. I am going to try to go higher up the hill soon with binoculars and try to see what is going on in the nest.

And a correction, the tree is not a Greater fir, but a Larch. And probably only about 125-150 feet high since a probable lightning strike took off the top third or so, but giving the birds a more-or-less flat surface as a good basis for a nest. The tree to the right of the nest tree is also a Larch, somewhat scraggly looking trees but in a picture-esque way.

I will wait until early fall when they migrate to cut-up and burn the dead trees and slash.

I was a split second late with the first pic, but he had a 8-9" long fish in his talons. And in the second pic, the small blurred forms are smaller birds which dart around the nest, I assume the inside of the nest looks like a bird smorgasbord, with lots of dead small animal parts and pieces of raw fish all over and they are looking for a chance to help themselves (place gross-out smily here) :icon_wink

Not likely they will risk the wrath of mama Osprey though :viking4:

Mistress Klaus
Wednesday, June 29th, 2005, 08:11 PM
This recent update/news on the Osprey makes me very happy.;) I appreciate seeing the photo's.:viking1: Lovely. :)

DreamWalker
Thursday, June 30th, 2005, 06:50 AM
Glad you enjoyed the pics:) , and thanks for the comments, I was not sure anyone was following the thread. I hope in a month or so to get some pics of the three of them when the little one is old enough to fly and the parents are teaching him to hunt.

In the meantime, here are 4 deer that live higher up the hill, and come through regularly (and eat the lower leaves off of the fruit trees I planted this Spring:viking2: ) on their way down to the lake for water. Pic taken from kitchen window about a week ago, the tree the Osprey live in is just out of pic at upper right, the big fellow at right already has a good start on his antlers, should be pretty big by October when the rut begins. The flat spot at center left is where I am going to build a gazebo in a couple of years after the ground settles from the digging.:viking3:

This gazebo will have a great view of the lake and forest and of course will provide shade in the summer, be among the fruit and evergreen trees, and I think will be a wonderful place for my future mate (Wherever she is:confused: ) to feed and bond with our babies.

DreamWalker
Thursday, July 7th, 2005, 08:10 AM
A few more pics, first is one of the adults flying around the nest, they seem to be at the point where they are trying to entice the young one to fly. Second is with 2X magnification so as to better see the head of one above the side of nest. As I study them, they study the feeding habits of Nordishus Falisher as I grill Shrimp Skampi on the deck.

:rolleyes:

Last is the deer again, and is NOT magnified, but poor quality because of taking pic through the window at an angle. They have no qualms about bedding down in the tall grass 2-3 meters from the house, but immediately de-ass the area if an outside door is opened.

TisaAnne
Thursday, July 7th, 2005, 08:36 AM
Great pics, DreamWalker! :) It's nice that you keep updating this thread with pictures and info on your birds... you are lucky to have these wonderful guests in your yard.


As I study them, they study the feeding habits of Nordishus Falisher as I grill Shrimp Skampi on the deck.

:icon_mrgr Mmmmm.... Skampi sounds so good right now.

(I'm really hungry! :shrugani: )


Last is the deer again, and is NOT magnified, but poor quality because of taking pic through the window at an angle. They have no qualms about bedding down in the tall grass 2-3 meters from the house, but immediately de-ass the area if an outside door is opened.

The deer that hang around my place aren't as people shy as yours... I can go out in the yard, work in the garden, etc., and they'll hang out within eyesight, and sometimes as close as 10-15ft of me, without any qualms or nervousness... It's kind of nice when I'm out doing yardwork to have them just off in the distance, feeding in the pasture, but if I move too fast or walk directly toward them... They scatter, and all you see is their white hind-ends disappear into the thicket as they depart.

Though I do enjoy their company, they've become a really bad nuisance... I've tried everything to keep them from ravaging my garden, yet they still continue to munch and chew their way through all of my hard work. I've rubbed panther-piss (stuff I got from the garden store) on posts and perimeter, tried these shiny silver plastic things that are supposed to scare deer when the sunlight reflects off of them, and even these noise-making things... none of it works though. I had also thought maybe keeping my dog out during the night would deter them... but he doesn't even bother chasing them away. In fact, I think he likes their company!

But, I can't complain too much... as I'd be quite sad if there ever came a day when I could not see and experience these animals in such a close proximity... I don't want to take nature for granted, but I don't want my garden being turned into a 5-course smorgasbord either. :laugh:

Ah, well... such is life, no? ;)

DreamWalker
Saturday, July 9th, 2005, 02:44 AM
I would like to find something to keep the deer away from my fruit and nut trees, they look funny with the leaves eaten of the bottom 4-5 feet:frown:

Perhaps a sign saying "Venison - $1 per pound":rotfl:

Is that you in your avatar? If so, interesting ensemble.

:rolleyes:

TisaAnne
Saturday, July 9th, 2005, 04:54 AM
I would like to find something to keep the deer away from my fruit and nut trees, they look funny with the leaves eaten of the bottom 4-5 feet:frown:

Just be thankful it's only deer that are eating your fruit trees... ;)

Where I grew up, back in Northern California, this very noisey and arrogant black bear used come into our orchard around harvest time... Every year he, (it was always the same bear), would tear through our white nectarine and cherry trees, practically ripping them out of the ground, and eat all of the fruit off of them. Oddly he only went after those fruits, even though we had peach, apple, pear and plum trees, too... After about 4 or 5 years of him doing this, my stepdad finally had to kill him because he had started to eat our livestock (a few sheep and goats, and eventually one of our dogs). It was sad, that he had to be shot, but we couldn't have him killing our animals, either. If it's any consolation, we did eat him... and boy was he good! :) ("Waste not, want not", as the saying goes...)



Is that you in your avatar? If so, interesting ensemble.
No.. that's not me! :rofl: Though, now that you mention it... I do kind of resemble her, in the shape of the face and features. Weird, I hadn't noticed that before... I just liked the picture. :cool:

BTW, DreamWalker... where at in Idaho do you live? I remember you had asked me if I lived anywhere near Coeur d'Alene before, is that where you live? I had always assumed that was kind of a big city, or something, certainly not as wild and wooded as where you seem to be. :confused: I've never been to ID before, but from the pictures you have shown, it does seem like a very nice place with lots of nature...

lei.talk
Saturday, July 9th, 2005, 05:48 AM
I would like to find something to keep the deer away from my fruit and nut trees,
i have had complete success
with the scarecrow motion activated sprinklers.

when they first appeared, a few years ago,
in one of my fruit-tree catalogs
- i bought a bunch
and they work great!

DreamWalker
Saturday, July 9th, 2005, 09:30 AM
i have had complete success
with the scarecrow motion activated sprinklers.

when they first appeared, a few years ago,
in one of my fruit-tree catalogs
- i bought a bunch
and they work great!

A guy mentioned those on a TV garden show call-in talk segment a few years ago, he said it worked fine for about a week.

Then the deer figured out the water pattern and were able to avoid the water.:mad:

Maybe his deer were smarter than yours:icon1: :viking3:

lei.talk
Saturday, July 9th, 2005, 07:01 PM
Maybe his deer were smarter than yours:icon1: :viking3:perhaps,
but it sounds more like the deer were smarter than him.
he could not figure out a sprinkler-pattern with no gaps?

i arranged mine with overlapping fields-of-fire.
there was no enemy-penetration of my perimeter.

DreamWalker
Saturday, July 9th, 2005, 09:31 PM
i arranged mine with overlapping fields-of-fire.
there was no enemy-penetration of my perimeter.
:rotfl:

Kool:beer-smil

I think he said he built his himself, cost about $100 for one, obviously he was not aware that they are commercially available. For that matter, I did not know that either, do you have the link for the co that sells them? Of course if they are real pricey, perhaps I should simply replace all my fruit/nut trees with Carpathian Walnut trees, which the deer do not bother, sell the excess Walnuts on E-bay, and use the $ to buy my fruit at the store:D

lei.talk
Saturday, July 9th, 2005, 10:16 PM
scarecrow motion activated sprinklers is the correct name.
i purchased mine from one of my fruit-tree catalogs.
they were forty dollars each,
if purchased in case-lots.
they probably run fifty-sixty dollars, now.

perhaps I should simply replace all my fruit/nut trees with Carpathian Walnut trees, which the deer do not bother, sell the excess Walnuts on E-bay, and use the $ to buy my fruit at the store:D
the quality of the fruit is not comparable and, of course,
then you would not have the satisfaction
of gently molding nature
to your desires.

being "the crown of creation"
is both a responsiblity and a pleasure.

DreamWalker
Saturday, July 9th, 2005, 11:05 PM
Just be thankful it's only deer that are eating your fruit trees... ;)

Where I grew up, back in Northern California, this very noisey and arrogant black bear used come into our orchard around harvest time... Every year he, (it was always the same bear), would tear through our white nectarine and cherry trees, practically ripping them out of the ground, and eat all of the fruit off of them. Oddly he only went after those fruits, even though we had peach, apple, pear and plum trees, too... After about 4 or 5 years of him doing this, my stepdad finally had to kill him because he had started to eat our livestock (a few sheep and goats, and eventually one of our dogs). It was sad, that he had to be shot, but we couldn't have him killing our animals, either. If it's any consolation, we did eat him... and boy was he good! :) ("Waste not, want not", as the saying goes...)

I had heard only the hindquarters of bear were tasty:scratch:

I did not want to mention it as he de-assed the area before I could get my camera, and was not sure anyone would believe me otherwise, but I had a Grizzly Bear for awhile! A very rare sight as most are in Canada, but I am not that far from the Selkirk Grizzly resettlement project in extreme N Idaho adjacent to Canada, one of only 5 Grizzly areas in the lower 48. While making breakfast, out the window I noticed a large buck deer in full terrified flight, I thought WTF, what's his problem? About 15-20 seconds later a Grizzly lumbered through, one of the gray ones with the silvery tips, had a flowing effect as he walked, amazing creatures, you can see their power as they move. Did not seem interested in the fruit trees (although mine are only 6-8 ft tall and with no fruit yet) except to stop and sniff a pop can with a few shells in it hanging from a tree (supposed to keep deer away, wrong again), so that told me he was doing some trash-can diving and knew that sometimes good munchies came in cans. I was so mad that I could not get the camera out in time, probably never see one again, they are very rare in the lower 48. Too bad, as they do an excellent job of keeping deer away;) , I was wondering why I had seen hardly any deer for a week or two. I had put up the cans with a few expended cartridges in each about the time the deer disappeared and thought they were working prety well:redface: :viking2:




No.. that's not me! :rofl: Though, now that you mention it... I do kind of resemble her, in the shape of the face and features. Weird, I hadn't noticed that before... I just liked the picture. :cool:

I thought perhaps it was a new avant-garde fashion statement:coffee:

:rolleyes:



BTW, DreamWalker... where at in Idaho do you live? I remember you had asked me if I lived anywhere near Coeur d'Alene before, is that where you live? I had always assumed that was kind of a big city, or something, certainly not as wild and wooded as where you seem to be. :confused: I've never been to ID before, but from the pictures you have shown, it does seem like a very nice place with lots of nature...
See your PM:)

DreamWalker
Saturday, July 9th, 2005, 11:11 PM
scarecrow motion activated sprinklers is the correct name.
i purchased mine from one of my fruit-tree catalogs.
they were forty dollars each,
if purchased in case-lots.
they probably run fifty-sixty dollars, now.

the quality of the fruit is not comparable and, of course,
then you would not have the satisfaction
of gently molding nature
to your desires.

being "the crown of creation"
is both a responsiblity and a pleasure.

Found 'em, $89 each from the maker, not going to be cost-effective for only 7 trees to protect:icon_sad:

And would be nice to be self-sufficient, a lot more difficult for the gov to control if you are:viking4:

lei.talk
Sunday, July 10th, 2005, 07:48 AM
ouch!
you might like these prices better.

http://www.absolutebirdcontrol.com/scarecrow.htm?ABS=overture

http://www.sprinklerwarehouse.com/shop3/enter.html?target=Hose_EndsMotion_Activa ted_Sprinkler.html

http://www.greentouchirrigation.com/acb/showdetl.cfm?&DID=30&Product_ID=729&CATID=25

lei.talk
Monday, July 11th, 2005, 01:57 AM
And would be nice to be self-sufficient,
a lot more difficult for the gov to control if you are:viking4:
yes! it is much nicer to work only as you wish.
if you own your shelter
and the land for your food and water,
how can they lever you into wage-slavery?

what employer is going to pay you enough
that you can afford to quit?
self-employment is the answer!
it also frees you and your family
from undesired associations.

here is good advice to budding nordish exemplars (http://www.forums.skadi.net/showpost.php?p=107342&postcount=1).

DreamWalker
Monday, July 11th, 2005, 04:39 AM
ouch!
you might like these prices better.

http://www.sprinklerwarehouse.com/shop3/enter.html?target=Hose_EndsMotion_Activa ted_Sprinkler.html


Thanks, still need battteries though, the ideal would be something naturally found, so as to be one less thing to worry about having to obtain in case of societal collapse:)

I'm probably asking for for too much:viking1:

lei.talk
Monday, July 11th, 2005, 09:23 PM
still need battteries thoughthat means your homestead could use
one of those solar-powered battery-rechargers.
they even make those for cell-phone,
pda, and lap-top batteries.
technology travels into the wilderness.

a satellite-connection for your lap-top
keeps you connected to the good
and isolated from the bad.
a carefully-designed enterprise
staffed by a thoroughly-trained cadre
does not require one's physical presence.

DreamWalker
Thursday, July 14th, 2005, 03:23 AM
The little guy just took his first flight! Although he is about full-grown now, not really little. About time actually, he was becoming a pest with his "kee kee kee" all the time. The parents were feeding him enough to keep him going but not enough to satisfy him, to try to encourage him to fly, and he has been getting pretty vocal.

Tues morning he was very loud, so I got out the camera, dad was flying around and around the nest encouraging him, (pic #1) it looked like he was so excited to see dad he flapped his wings in exuberance and found himself a few feet out the nest:O , and then started really flapping in panic, ha ha. But all was OK, the 3 of them flew around the nest for a few minutes, pic 2 and 3 (one bird is half out of pic at the left edge of one of those). Gliding is a better term than flying in this case, with the heat it seemed there were a lot of updrafts and they only occasionally needed to flap.

Then mom went back to the nest and watched (pic 4) while the two of them went VERY high (pic 5, at left and bottom), and glided around for awhile. The last 2 pics are with 2X magnification which is all my older cheapo camera has. More magnification would have been great, as with my 7X35 binoculars it was easy to see the dark mottling on the females neck while she was in the nest.

But he is still making some noise when he gets hungry, as he has not been taught to hunt yet.

Frostwood
Thursday, July 14th, 2005, 12:53 PM
Hawks are truly magnificent creatures. Too bad there is none at my backyard, so I rarely see them. But it's a noble sight when one glides in the open sky.

As for my guests, I have "merely" three hedgehogs, who occasionally come to my yard, sniffing with all their apparent curiosity, and then have a sip of water. They seem to be quite off in a world of their own, and so you can get quite close to one when restraining any faster movements. Though, when they see you they get alert, and likely curl themselves up in that little ball of spikes and start making that odd "potpotpotpot"-style of noise. Then if you are foolish enough to put your hand on one's back, the hedgehog will jump up, effectively piercing your skin with it's spikes (never tried it though, and won't either). I have noticed that my cats steer clear of them. Maybe they have had bad experiences? :laugh:

lei.talk
Friday, July 15th, 2005, 04:59 AM
Too bad there is none at my backyard, so I rarely see them. have you considered putting out hawk-food?

when i moved on to the property
and began settling it,
in preparation of child-rearing,
i was pleased to gaze out from the ridge
and be eye-to-eye with many red-tailed hawks
as they gyred over the valley.

my clearing, land-shaping and planting,
in the valley,
must have disturbed the original balance.
after a few years,
the hawks had significantly reduced the squirrels
and the rabbits could not reproduce
as fast as the full-moon forays by coyotes
were depleting them.

the spiraling and stooping hawks became a rare pleasure.

one week, while i was in town,
i purchased an extra roll of chicken-wire,
a breeding-pair of brown rabbits
and a large bag of the kibble that they were accustomed to.

i fenced-in the unused space under my hot-tub deck,
to keep the coyotes out,
and put the rabbits in - to do what rabbits do.
she began throwing a litter every couple of months,
so did her kits.

i would let them out into the valley with the sun-rise
and, just before sunset, i would rattle the feed-pan
to lure them back to the hutch.

some chose not to return to shelter;
some did not live to return;
enough breeders return to the hutch (each night)
and re-populate the valley
in sufficient quantities to keep the many hawks fed.

KirFrid
Friday, July 15th, 2005, 05:17 AM
Nice pictures. We have a few hawks around the countryside here as well. When I was a kid I used to find it kind of relaxing to lie in the middle of the field and watch them.

About the cats, I guess they were kittens at the time? Never seen a hawk take out a full grown cat :scratch: Sure it wasn't the fishers? I blame the fishers for all my cat disapearances, haha. They are ****in vicious those things!

DreamWalker
Monday, August 1st, 2005, 07:47 AM
Usually the parents mostly stay away from the nest, presumably to get the little one used to being on her own (yes, fairly sure little one is a female) but something was happening today, all three stayed in the nest most of the day scanning to the NE, I think it may have been another Osprey or an eagle trying to........?? Mom is the largest, at right, dad at left and junior in the middle, with 2X magnification. I have some guests coming Aug 12th-13th who have a better camera, so check thread mid-August and hopefully I will have some pics with more magnification.

2nd pic is junior from about a week ago, possibly with her first fish, as she had to make about 4 approaches to the nest, and seemed unsure of how to land and perch while holding a fish:cool: Unfortunately, I was not lucky with my timing and her left wing was down and so don't have a good silouette of her holding the fish.

A local acquaintence was telling me that a few months ago while fishing he saw 2 Osprey attack an eagle in it's nest, I assume they wanted the nest or perhaps to eat or destroy the eagles egg(s), or both, but the larger eagle was able to run them off. Eagles are their only competition in the sky and they are not friendly to each other:viking4:

Third pic is that of a Wild Turkey family and some of their half-grown chicks, pardon the poor quality, had to take through the dining room window.

Stig NHF
Monday, August 1st, 2005, 10:04 AM
Very nice, got me smiling :)

newenstad
Tuesday, August 2nd, 2005, 01:26 AM
Great pictures...

newenstad
Tuesday, August 2nd, 2005, 01:26 AM
Great pictures...

TisaAnne
Tuesday, August 2nd, 2005, 04:16 AM
Yes, indeed... Nice pictures, DW, and thanks for the new update of your birds. :) I really like the way you give such detailed descriptions of the birds and their habits, it gives us a great glimpse into the lives of such magnficent creatures. You must spend a lot of time 'bird-gazing' to know so much about this little family!

I was up in British Columbia last week and I visited a sanctuary for predatory birds in Victoria. They had some eagles and owls, but mostly there were falcons and it was so amazing to see these birds up close... They aren't just "birds", they are very smart and always seem to be watching and analyzing everything. They have such unique personalities and mannerisms and even two falcons who look indentical in appearence can easily be distinguished from eachother by their individual 'style' and behavior. Some were very shy and cautious, others were curious, some aggressive, but there was one that I was completely enamoured by... It was a rather large Peregrine male and he was so bold and cocky, and as prideful as any human could ever be. We got to interact with the birds, to touch them and feed them, and it was just so great!

I'll say this again, as I've said it several times before ;), you a very fortunate to share a space with such inspiring birds DreamWalker!!! :D

TisaAnne
Tuesday, August 2nd, 2005, 04:16 AM
Yes, indeed... Nice pictures, DW, and thanks for the new update of your birds. :) I really like the way you give such detailed descriptions of the birds and their habits, it gives us a great glimpse into the lives of such magnficent creatures. You must spend a lot of time 'bird-gazing' to know so much about this little family!

I was up in British Columbia last week and I visited a sanctuary for predatory birds in Victoria. They had some eagles and owls, but mostly there were falcons and it was so amazing to see these birds up close... They aren't just "birds", they are very smart and always seem to be watching and analyzing everything. They have such unique personalities and mannerisms and even two falcons who look indentical in appearence can easily be distinguished from eachother by their individual 'style' and behavior. Some were very shy and cautious, others were curious, some aggressive, but there was one that I was completely enamoured by... It was a rather large Peregrine male and he was so bold and cocky, and as prideful as any human could ever be. We got to interact with the birds, to touch them and feed them, and it was just so great!

I'll say this again, as I've said it several times before ;), you a very fortunate to share a space with such inspiring birds DreamWalker!!! :D

DreamWalker
Wednesday, August 3rd, 2005, 06:05 AM
Yes, indeed... Nice pictures, DW, and thanks for the new update of your birds. :) I really like the way you give such detailed descriptions of the birds and their habits, it gives us a great glimpse into the lives of such magnficent creatures. You must spend a lot of time 'bird-gazing' to know so much about this little family!

Not that much time, I read about their habits at the link at the first post, but I see them every day, probably average about 10 minutes a day watching them. And they get very excitable and vocal when something of interest is happening, so I stop what I am doing if I can and take a look.

And some of my comments about what they are doing may well be wrong:rolleyes:


I was up in British Columbia last week and I visited a sanctuary for predatory birds in Victoria. They had some eagles and owls, but mostly there were falcons and it was so amazing to see these birds up close... They aren't just "birds", they are very smart and always seem to be watching and analyzing everything. They have such unique personalities and mannerisms and even two falcons who look indentical in appearence can easily be distinguished from eachother by their individual 'style' and behavior. Some were very shy and cautious, others were curious, some aggressive, but there was one that I was completely enamoured by... It was a rather large Peregrine male and he was so bold and cocky, and as prideful as any human could ever be. We got to interact with the birds, to touch them and feed them, and it was just so great!

No Ospreys? That's discrimination:annoysigr ;)


I'll say this again, as I've said it several times before ;), you a very fortunate to share a space with such inspiring birds DreamWalker!!! :D

Well, semi-fortunate;) . The little one has become quite vocal in the last month, wanting food, wanting the company of the parents, sits up there going "cheep cheep cheep" for hours at a time:speechles .

But the parents will be flying to their winter grounds on the Gulf of Mexico in a month and a half, they have taught her to hunt for fish and I presume whatever else a young bird needs to know, and she will have to be able to survive on her own and fly down a week or so later alone when she realizes they are not coming back and it is getting cold. Kind of sad in a way, as she is pretty much alone except at night, and the parents will abandon her in mid-Sept, but a good example of "tough love" on the parents part I should think. But when she gets to the winter grounds, she will have plenty of other youngsters for company for a few years until she becomes sexually mature. And then her and her mate will fly up North to breed some future spring.

DreamWalker
Monday, October 24th, 2005, 03:54 AM
Last Osprey pic of this year, they flew South Sept 12th, probably to the Gulf coast or Baja California. The nest is very large and seems intact, so hopefully they will be back in early March. I took this pic back in mid-August, I did not use the borrowed camera correctly and only got 4X magnification (I think) instead of the hoped-for 10X.:icon1: And angle is wrong to see head clearly.

And I got this pic of a woodpecker a few days ago, pecking for the insects that killed this Larch tree and apparently are still living in the stump, fairly large birds really, 2X magnification through my 'puter room window, and quite shy, the flash from the camera indoors seems to have sent him flying away.

lei.talk
Monday, October 24th, 2005, 04:14 AM
Last Osprey...flew South...probably to the Gulf coast or Baja California.where would they swing west
to approach baja?

early or late in the journey?

DreamWalker
Monday, October 24th, 2005, 04:25 AM
where would they swing west
to approach baja?

early or late in the journey?

I have no idea, but those are supposedly the wintering grounds, and Florida I believe but these are West coast birds so probably not Fl.:animal-sm

Actually Baja seems about straight South from N Idaho, at longtitude 116.

lei.talk
Monday, October 24th, 2005, 05:04 AM
Baja seems about straight South from N Idaho, at longtitude 116.i see what you mean,
by the time they reach the gulf of california
- there are no mountains
in their path.