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View Full Version : Country life lures Norwegians



Sonja
Thursday, March 24th, 2005, 09:36 AM
Record numbers of Norwegians are clicking into a new web site that lists rural properties for sale. Many small farms, formerly highly regulated by agricultural authorities, can now be bought on the open market, and demand is high.

The web site, called gardsbruk.no (http://www.gardsbruk.no), lists rural properties for sale and for lease around the country, and thousands of Norwegians are checking it out.

Newspaper Aftenposten recently reported that as many as 12 percent of all Norwegians would consider moving to outlying rural areas, according to a new survey.

Some of the properties can also now be used as holiday homes, since state rules demanding full-year residence were scrapped for properties with little farmable land around them.

"We think it's great that so many people are interested," said Bård Lahn, project coordinator for Gardsbruk.no. In February alone, nearly 17,000 people clicked into the site and the number continues to grow.

Stig NHF
Thursday, March 24th, 2005, 10:56 AM
Well, for once some good news. Although I sadly assume most of them are looking for just somewhere to spend their holidays etc.

MenschNaturTechnik
Thursday, March 31st, 2005, 01:30 AM
This would seem to be a good development, at least the desire to get away from the rootless cosmopolitanism of city-life. a couple of questions we might ask ourselves though:
- is this "white flight"? (are norwegians giving up ground?)
- is this "sprawl"? (what's the environmental impact?)

Naggaroth
Thursday, March 31st, 2005, 12:26 PM
Record numbers of Norwegians are clicking into a new web site that lists rural properties for sale. Many small farms, formerly highly regulated by agricultural authorities, can now be bought on the open market, and demand is high.

The web site, called gardsbruk.no (http://www.gardsbruk.no), lists rural properties for sale and for lease around the country, and thousands of Norwegians are checking it out.

Newspaper Aftenposten recently reported that as many as 12 percent of all Norwegians would consider moving to outlying rural areas, according to a new survey.

Some of the properties can also now be used as holiday homes, since state rules demanding full-year residence were scrapped for properties with little farmable land around them.

"We think it's great that so many people are interested," said Bård Lahn, project coordinator for Gardsbruk.no. In February alone, nearly 17,000 people clicked into the site and the number continues to grow.

And the best thing with this is that those who want to move back to the countryside is norwegians who is comming from old countryside-families. They want to go back to the roots as we speak.


Well, for once some good news. Although I sadly assume most of them are looking for just somewhere to spend their holidays etc.
1 Week Ago 11:36 AM

Some of them, yes, but for most of them they want to go back to the countryside to infact work as farmers. I think that that is impressive and that I also want to do it. Buy a little farm with animals, just to produce for me and my family and for the butchers and for the diaries.



- is this "white flight"? (are norwegians giving up ground?)
- is this "sprawl"? (what's the environmental impact?)


Norwegians are never giving ut ground. Nor will they ever do. For instance, they didn't sell Jämtland and Härjedalen to Sweden. We didn't even give it up for the Swedes. We lost it in a fight. In a war.

The Horned God
Thursday, March 31st, 2005, 12:43 PM
I sadly assume most of them are looking for just somewhere to spend their holidays etc.

That could very well be the case if its anything like the situation in Ireland where up to 80% of the houses in certain areas are holiday homes.
If that is what's happening, then it is not really anything to celebrate as it is bad for the cohesion of local communities and detracts from the landscape.

The Horned God
Thursday, March 31st, 2005, 01:36 PM
Some of them, yes, but for most of them they want to go back to the countryside to infact work as farmers. I think that that is impressive and that I also want to do it. Buy a little farm with animals, just to produce for me and my family and for the butchers and for the diaries.

If that is the case then it's great development for Norway, and may be the best hope for the future.




Norwegians are never giving ut ground. Nor will they ever do. For instance, they didn't sell Jämtland and Härjedalen to Sweden. We didn't even give it up for the Swedes. We lost it in a fight. In a war.

That was a different era, and a situation in which the Norwegian government was acting in Norways best interests. You can't rely on your government to fight your corner against the "new invaders" either now or in the future, I am afraid.
Within the current framework very individual must decide for themselves if they think their nation deserves to survive or not and to act acordingly.

Naggaroth
Thursday, March 31st, 2005, 02:49 PM
If that is the case then it's great development for Norway, and may be the best hope for the future.





That was a different era, and a situation in which the Norwegian government was acting in Norways best interests. You can't rely on your government to fight your corner against the "new invaders" either now or in the future, I am afraid.
Within the current framework very individual must decide for themselves if they think their nation deserves to survive or not and to act acordingly.
I think you understood that wrong. I think that it is okey that these areas is Swedish but still I mentioned that just to show that we are not giving up any land to immigrants who wants to use this as a holiday/vacation place. We simply don't do that.

Stig NHF
Thursday, March 31st, 2005, 03:11 PM
Bullshit Naggaroth, and you know it. What are your sources for "most of them want to work as farmers" ? Every source I have seen on this subject says otherwise, that they want it as a retreat during summer etc. Even though 200 000 people in Oslo purchase rural farms, that doesn't mean Oslo will loose 200 000 people, its more like they will go to their farm during summer instead of going to Thailand.

And what is this about "Norwegians never giving ground" ? Do you live in fairyland or something? We haven't done anything but give ground for the last 1000 years or there about, especially around the year 1000, 1350-1905 and as hard as possible from 1945 till 2005. It would be more suiting to say "Norwegians haven't stood their ground in any areas of importance ever".