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infoterror
Wednesday, March 23rd, 2005, 06:56 PM
[ Summary: Jesus Christ learned much of his religious training in Aryan Buddhist India; we are to surmise that Saul then turned Christianity into what it is, namely an anti-natural and anti-Aryan force. ]

Jesus Lived in India: His Unknown Life Before and After the Crucifixion
by Holger Kersten

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1852305509/

H. T. Prinsep. Tibet, Tartary and Mongolia.

The earliest travels in Tibet proper which have been transmitted to us, are those of Jesuit Fathers, Grueber and Dorville, who returned from China by that route in A.D. 1661, just four hundred years after Marco Polo's journey westward. They were the first Christians of Europe who are known to have penetrated into the populous parts of Tibet, for Marco Polo's journey was, as we have stated, to the north west by the sources of Oxus. Father Grueber was much struck with the extraordinary similitude he found, as well in the doctrine as in the rituals of Buddhists of Lassa to those of his own Romish Faith. He noticed, 1st: that the dress of Lamas corresponded with that handed down to us in ancient paintings, as the dress of the Apostles. 2nd: that the discipline of monasteries and of the different orders of Lamas or priests bore the same resemblance to that of the Romish Church. 3rd: that the notion of an incarnation was common to both, as also the belief in paradise and purgatory. 4th: he remarked that they made suffrages, alms, prayers and sacrifices for the dead, like the Roman Catholics. 5th: that they had convents, filled with monks and friars to the number of 30,000, near Lassa. who all made their vows of poverty, obedience and chastity, like Roman monks, besides other vows. And 6th: they had confessors, licensed by the superior Lamas or bishops; and so empowered to receive confessions and to impose penances, and give absolution. Besides all this, there was found the practice of using holy water, of singing service in alternation, of praying for the dead, and a perfect similarity in the costumes of the great and the superior Lamas to those of different orders of Romish hierarchy. These early missionaries further were led to conclude from what they saw and heard, that the ancient books of the Lamas contained traces of the Christian religion, which must, they thought, have been preached in Tibet in the time of Apostles. (Pages 12-14).

http://www.alislam.org/books/jesus-in-india/appendix.html

# Ancient scrolls reveal that Jesus spent seventeen years in India and Tibet
# From age thirteen to age twenty-nine, he was both a student and teacher of Buddhist and Hindu holy men
# The story of his journey from Jerusalem to Benares was recorded by Brahman historians
# Today they still know him and love him as St. Issa. Their 'buddha'

Notovitch In 1894 Nicolas Notovitch published a book called The Unknown Life of Christ. He was a Russian doctor who journeyed extensively throughout Afghanistan, India, and Tibet. Notovitch journeyed through the lovely passes of Bolan, over the Punjab, down into the arid rocky land of Ladak, and into the majestic Vale of Kashmir of the Himalayas. During one of his jouneys he was visiting Leh, the capital of Ladak, near where the buddhist convent Himis is. He had an accident that resulted in his leg being broken. This gave him the unscheduled opportunity to stay awhile at the Himis convent.

Himis Convent Notovitch learned, while he was there, that there existed ancient records of the life of Jesus Christ. In the course of his visit at the great convent, he located a Tibetan translation of the legend and carefully noted in his carnet de voyage over two hundred verses from the curious document known as "The Life of St. Issa."

He was shown two large yellowed volumes containing the biography of St. Issa. Notovitch enlisted a member of his party to translate the Tibetan volumes while he carefully noted each verse in the back pages of his journal.

http://reluctant-messenger.com/issa.htm

IvyLeaguer
Wednesday, May 25th, 2005, 07:03 AM
Thanks so much for listing this book. I'm researching this topic right now and needed it as a reference. A million THANKS!!!