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White Iceland
Saturday, March 5th, 2005, 06:13 PM
from Axis History Forum
http://forum.axishistory.com/


SS Iceland expedition films

I have collected much of the known material concerned with Nazi expeditions to Iceland. What I would most like to find now is the documentary film shot during these expeditions. Peter Levenda writes in his Unholy Alliance about discovering footage of the Tibet expeditions in the Tibet House in New York City (please excuse inaccuracies, writing from memory). Also, a British documentary on Hitler's Quest for the Holy Grail a couple of years ago used footage not only from Tibet but also from the Antarctic expeditions. The documentary mentioned Otto Rahn and his Iceland visit, but the visual material used was simply a map, leading me to believe the Iceland footage must lie unearthed in an archive somewhere. Does anyone know where SS Ahnenerbe and related research films turned up after the war or where to start looking for such "lost" films today?
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The best work I know of on German Nazi occult activities in general is a
book by the British historian Mr. Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke which you may be
familar with. He describes Rahn in this book and quotes several sources ,
incl. a travel book by R. which I used in my book Islandsaevintyri
Himmlers. There is a short passage in it on the trip to Iceland - but very
general. I also used one book on Rahn by a French author, but again, it is
very spurious to the say the least.
With best regards,
Thorburn Whitehead.
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The Ahnenerbe had an Institute to study the Eddas (considered by Himmler a sacred text) and Iceland itself, which the Ahnenerbe considered something of a holy land, like Tibet. Based on the ariosophical beliefs like those that gave rise to the Thule Gesellschaft, the Ahnenerbe saw Iceland as the last surviving connection with Thule, the mystical homeland of the pure Germanic race of prehistory. The Eddas contained secret knowledge for the Ahnenerbe, keys by which they could unlock their ancestral heritage. Besides study of the Eddas, the Ahnenerbe also wanted to study Icelandic artifacts, and, as they had in Tibet, perform "the recording of human images", using calipers to measure facial dimensions based on ethnological pseudoscience.

The Ahnenerbe succeeded in sending a mission to Iceland in 1938, but it was a thorough failure. On orders from Himmler himself, the expedition was to search for a hof, a place of worship of Norse gods such as Thorburn and Odin. The expedition ultimately failed as the Reichsbank lacked sufficient amounts of Icelandic kronur to fund their expenses, mainly due to German restrictions on foreign currency. The Icelandic officials also denied the Ahnenerbe permission to excavate in certain areas, and though the Ahnenerbe did find a cave they claimed to be Himmler's hof, it proved to have not been inhabited before the eighteenth century. The Ahnenerbe lost the opportunity for any further expeditions after Iceland was occupied by the US Marine Corps and British forces in mid-1941 to prevent its invasion by Germany.
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Niemczyk, Oskar dr. phil., Professor. Spalten auf Island. Geologische geodatische und geophysikalische Forschungsarbeiten der Deutschen Island Expedition des Jahres 1938. Mit Tafeln und 98 Abb. Stuttgart 1943.
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In the summer of 1936 Otto Rahn undertook, by order of the SS, an expedition to Iceland. Highlights of this journey formed part of some chapters in his second and final book "Lucifer's Courtiers", published in 1937. Rahn makes no mention of the SS and the ship that sailed for Iceland flew a flag with a blue swastika on white background (in sharp contrast to the official standard of the Third Reich).

For Rahn the primordial Light came not from the East but from the North. He travelled around the ancient sacred places of Europe: Externsteine, the site of Irminsul, sacred symbol of the Saxons; Thingveillir, place of assembly of the ancient Icelanders, and Reykholt, birthplace of Sturlusson, the Nordic Homer and author of the Edda.
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Burkert, Paul. Island erforscht, erschaut, erlebt. Eine erlebnismässige Schilderung der Insel am Polarkreis. Zolenroda 1936. (The author was a special agent to Himmler sent to the country to investigate possible land winnings for Great Germany).
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There are many travel books on Iceland written by Germans before the Otto Rahn visit mentioned. The Alfred Wegener film Das Grosse Eis, documenting an earlier expedition, was shown in Iceland to visitors on the Nordische Gesellschaft field trip during July 1936 (Deutsche Nordlandreise, 1937).

Todesritter
Saturday, March 5th, 2005, 06:49 PM
from Axis History Forum
http://forum.axishistory.com/

SS Iceland expedition films

........... The Ahnenerbe lost the opportunity for any further expeditions after Iceland was occupied by the US Marine Corps and British forces in mid-1941 to prevent its invasion by Germany. ..

Ironically, had Germany instead invaded Iceland to prevent its invasion by the US & British, and thus gained an unsinkable aircraft carrier to the west of British shipping lanes, I can imagine Britain could have been brought to a more accommodating mindset shortly thereafter. The prospect of the US attempting to intervene in Europe once that was done would have seemed rather cost prohibitive to Congress I’d imagine, no matter how Roosevelt cajoled.

IvyLeaguer
Thursday, May 26th, 2005, 04:34 AM
[QUOTE=White Iceland]from Axis History Forum
Does anyone know where SS Ahnenerbe and related research films turned up after the war or where to start looking for such "lost" films today?



All SS-Ahnenerbe film archives are currently located in the National Archives in College Park, Maryland outside Washington, D.C.

White Iceland
Sunday, July 24th, 2005, 02:02 AM
I found an interesting collection of scholarship in German:

http://homepages.uni-tuebingen.de/gerd.simon/nordistik1.htm

Which includes:

Die Island-Expedition des 'Ahnenerbes' der SS

http://homepages.uni-tuebingen.de/gerd.simon/island.pdf

Perhaps someone fluent can skim this article and post any specific information regarding the "hof" mentioned in notes in the original post.

Argonaut
Sunday, August 7th, 2005, 08:09 PM
The Ahnenerbe had an Institute to study the Eddas (considered by Himmler a sacred text) and Iceland itself, which the Ahnenerbe considered something of a holy land, like Tibet. Based on the ariosophical beliefs like those that gave rise to the Thule Gesellschaft, the Ahnenerbe saw Iceland as the last surviving connection with Thule, the mystical homeland of the pure Germanic race of prehistory. The Eddas contained secret knowledge for the Ahnenerbe, keys by which they could unlock their ancestral heritage. Besides study of the Eddas, the Ahnenerbe also wanted to study Icelandic artifacts, and, as they had in Tibet, perform "the recording of human images", using calipers to measure facial dimensions based on ethnological pseudoscience.

Such a presentation is highly biased. Saying that the Ahnenerbe considered Tibet, or Iceland, as holy lands is simply ridiculous. And Thule is nothing mystical, but the other name of Iceland, for some, or, for others, a part of the world to the North, which is supposed to be a craddle for Aryans and which cannot be attributed easily to an area in particular, since the shape of the continents have changed, due to continental drift, since then.

The Eddas contain no secret knowledge, they only contain knowledge, for those who want to learn, and read something else than the Bible.

Goodrick-Clarke is a popular author on the Third Reich, but he is often spinning tales, a fact which my own researches have convinced me of.




The expedition ultimately failed as the Reichsbank lacked sufficient amounts of Icelandic kronur to fund their expenses, mainly due to German restrictions on foreign currency.

This is funny that the Germans should be responsible for the currency restrictions, since anyone who has ever been to Iceland knows that it is not allowed by the Icelandic State to buy kronur outside of Iceland, and that one has to buy kronur at the Reykjavik airport. I assume that such a rule already applied at the time, but I may be wrong. It would be interesting to know.

Zyklop
Monday, August 8th, 2005, 07:37 AM
Perhaps someone fluent can skim this article and post any specific information regarding the "hof" mentioned in notes in the original post.
Which page is this? I don´t find a special mentioning of "hof".

White Iceland
Monday, August 8th, 2005, 02:03 PM
Which page is this? I don´t find a special mentioning of "hof".

I have looked over the article myself and had a couple of others read over it. It seems there is no additional info on said "hof" in this particular article. I would like to find more specific references to this but it could be just rumour...


[T]he expedition was to search for a hof, a place of worship of Norse gods such as Thorburn and Odin. ...[T]hough the Ahnenerbe did find a cave they claimed to be Himmler's hof, it proved to have not been inhabited before the eighteenth century.

Blutwölfin
Monday, August 8th, 2005, 06:53 PM
I just found that in another source:


[...]Thingveillir, place of assembly of the ancient Icelanders, and Reykholt, birthplace of Sturlusson, the Nordic Homer and author of the Edda.[...]

-> here (http://www.geocities.com/countermedia/Otto.html)

Maybe Reykholt was this mysterious "Hof"?

White Iceland
Monday, August 8th, 2005, 11:17 PM
I just found that in another source:

Maybe Reykholt was this mysterious "Hof"?

No, Snorri wasn't born at the town Reykholt, he was born on the farm Hvammur. I worked as a volunteer digging on Snorri's farm at Reykholt one summer. That is where he settled after his education at Oddi and where he likely wrote most of his works. It is also where he was killed, but no "hof" or cave matching that description there. There are caves not so far away at Húsafell area which were inhabited in settlement times, so that's a thought, particularly since the Germans were focusing some initial research in this countryside.

On a related note, Snorri was writing just after 1200, two centuries after the adoption of Christianity of course, and there were likely still those who performed blót or worship of the old gods in private at that time, perhaps even in small buildings with crosses on the outside, as heathenry in private was legal after adoption of the new faith, along with exposure death of infants and eating of horse meat. So, even if the "Himmler hof" cave mentioned was of a later date than settlement, it could still have represented a secret worship site for those defenders of the old religion.

Also, on the site of Snorri's farm in Reykholt there was discovered in 2000 a forked birch branch into which had been carved a face with one eye closed. I will try to find an image of this small but relevant discovery, as there are very few surviving examples of heathen period carvings in Iceland.

Argonaut
Wednesday, August 10th, 2005, 08:47 PM
No, Snorri wasn't born at the town Reykholt, he was born on the farm Hvammur. I worked as a volunteer digging on Snorri's farm at Reykholt one summer.

Interesting activity. :-)

The text on Rahn insists on his interest in Cathars, which was indeed his primary focus, but I doubt he set up the expedition to Iceland. I think he was appointed as a member of the team for his competence in archaeology, but he did not overview and/or define the goals of this expedition. Let us not forget that, as a SS, he was subordinate to Weisthor, or K. M. Wiligut.

Anyway, I think the German archaeological expedition in Iceland back in the 30's did not differ much in what dig-ups are today. It was an archaeological work, to improve historical knowledge. There probably were also scientists of other fields in the team, like zoologists, geologists...

White Iceland
Sunday, October 15th, 2006, 08:56 PM
...bump...

Vingolf
Friday, October 27th, 2006, 03:17 PM
Ironically, had Germany instead invaded Iceland to prevent its invasion by the US & British, and thus gained an unsinkable aircraft carrier to the west of British shipping lanes, I can imagine Britain could have been brought to a more accommodating mindset shortly thereafter.

- Agreed, but German sea power - the German Navy - was considerably weakened after the Weserübung.

Peter
Sunday, November 26th, 2006, 09:10 PM
The war had been distint, of course.