PDA

View Full Version : Sacred Norse Literature: Have You Any Queries?



Erlingr Hárbarđarson
Tuesday, February 8th, 2005, 11:59 PM
We, at Skadi, understand the some times difficult and toilsome readings of passages, poetics, tales and so forth in regard at our folks' olden words. Tis important to clearly understand the messages and properly decipher the metaphours of these works if a kinsman or kinswoman is to verily learn of by what values, from what beliefs and through what practises our heathen ancestors had sailed the seas of the ancient lifejourney.

Whether you are a northern brother reading the Íslendinga sögur for the third time, a young lady in need of guidance from the olden energies of the runes or a blessed mother-to-be at want of teaching your self the wisdom ahinde Snorra-Eddas Skáldskaparmál, we encourage you to express your understandings, your joys, your sorrows and your confusions with us here at Skadi at the hope to not only help you, but to further our heathen selves as well. As a family, tis important to share with each other and teach one another to that which we personally have been enlightened. This is called brother- and sisterhood. We praise such a concept at Skadi and define our selves by such heroic standards.

We understand that these sacred words are more than just words, but rather as fields of ancient thought. We know the thoughts dripping from the bloodroots of our heritage are of personal truths as well. One brother of the snows may interpret some event bespoken in any of the ţćttir distinctly to that of another brother and this case may be analogised to a certain heathen symbol withine a ţáttur as well.

At behalf of the Skadi family, I would like to gift winter sight and spring growth to all of our seed and extend many welcomes to post your queries and ensight aneath in regard at the literature of the Norsemen.

Erlingr

Erlingr Hárbarđarson
Wednesday, February 9th, 2005, 12:24 AM
Some thing I never understood withine the depths of Egils saga Skalla-Grímssonar- one of Náttfari and I´s personal favourites- (kvćđi, 60-62) was the meaning of the swallow out side the window as Egill was in need to write his drapa of 20 stanzas to save his head from kong Eirik Blodřks and dronning Gunnhild. I remember Arinbjörn sitting up with his kinsman all the night through, and he had gone to sit aside the attic window to make a see at the swallow and suddenly saw a shape-shifter in the form of a bird flying away. What was the meaning of this? Who was this shape-shifter and what had s/he wanted to see?

Náttfari
Wednesday, February 9th, 2005, 11:58 PM
The Swallow; I found little in the footnotes of the book, only that Nornir ("witches") were often shape-shifters (Icelandic: hamhleypa (singular)). It said that this was very similar to some Latin story when the Devil came as a fly and tried to mislead some guy.

I can research more, but I myself believe 'tis a symbol of evil, something distracting him so he won't be able to save his head. Perhaps 'twas fate or a dís that came to see what he was up to?

If I find out more, I shall post it here.

Erlingr Hárbarđarson
Friday, February 11th, 2005, 07:30 PM
Yes, I too believed that twas a dís who had sat eye on Egill to see of what stirs. The distraction away from Egils writing of the drápa led me to think of the swallow as a cursed stab of magick from dronning Gunnhild; aside the curse of her derisive behaviour and stubbornnes, she learnt from her Chieftain father, to whom she swore upon his death to never yield the the flow of her noble familys blood, how those with power shall crush those with out it. I know as a child, swept away she was by her fathers friđla, who was a hamrammr and a volva, and was later sent away to become a mastress of seiđr. Then a hústrú became on her to Eiríkr, and hatred for Egill was soon begot.

Honestly, I believe twas she who was the swallow. You and I both are at know of how dearly she awaited the neighing morn, of which she rested certain to give a head-less fate unto our brother Egill! She most likely became the swallow, being the seiđmađr she was, and went to see what he was up to at the attic of kinsman Arinbjörn. Do you agree, a Ghormuil?

Náttfari
Saturday, February 12th, 2005, 02:16 AM
I do agreed, friend.

Here is more information from Egils saga, copied from another post of mine:

For me, the battle of Brunanburgh is very interesting.

"Egill Skalla-Grímsson var víđförull og fór međal annars tvisvar sinnum til Englands, ađ ţví er hermt er í sögu hans. Í fyrra skiptiđ gekk hann til liđs viđ Ađalstein Englandskonung og vann fyrir hann frćkinn sigur á Ólafi rauđa, konungi Skota, í orrustunni á Vínheiđi. Á ensku er orrustan kennd viđ Brunanburgh og var hún háđ áriđ 937 e. Kr."

Translation: Egill Skalla-Grímsson travelled widely and went twice to England, as his saga tells us. The first time, he joined the forces of Ađalsteinn, king of England, and together they conquered Ólaf the red, king of Scotland, in the battle of Vínheiđi (vine-heath). In English the battle is called the battle of Brunanburgh and it was fought the year 937 A.D.

Taken from: http://malfridur.ismennt.is/vor2002/vol-18-1-21-26-thorhallur-eyj.htm

In this battle, Egill's brothre, Ţórólfr, died. That was a great loss to Egill, but he wrote a kvćđi (poem) about this (as he often did to comfort himself (and once to save his life)) and regained his joy.

Erlingr Hárbarđarson
Saturday, February 12th, 2005, 02:34 AM
I was sad when Ţórólfr died. Remember you, frćndi, when kong Ađalsteinn set eye at Egill from across the table -where all celebrate of victoury- after Ţórólfrs death, with his [Egils] head weighing heavy down and those grey bushy eye brows of him. That was the first time, we saw Egill truly saddened. I was happy to see the comfort Ađalsteinn had shown to Egill and the gifts and silver Egill was gifted as compensations, especially the golden armband, beautiful.

Remember you what he did with his chests gifted from Ađalsteinn those many years later? Hehe, he did the same thing as his father, at his last days, took it and hid it for eternal sleep; one buried it in a hillside/cave and the other in the sea. This was very interesting.

Why do you believe Kveldúlfsson and Skalla-Grímsson did this in their final days? What do you believe they learnt in their tested lives that led them to do this and what are we to learn of this? I feel some thing very spiritual was ahinde it and in their olden wisdom, they are showing us what is of true worth in life and what is to be understood as but mere air.

Praise be to our forefathers at this night, a Ghormuil.

Náttfari
Thursday, February 17th, 2005, 12:56 AM
I think that Egill burried his silver because he did not trust any one to handle it, he might've thought that his silver would be spent on nonsense. Also, he might have thought he would one day come back in the afterlife and get it and bring it with himself to Valhöll to present it to Óđinn. Perhaps that burrying the silver barrels was a sacrifice to Móđir nature or the gods themselves.

Remember that he first wanted to throw his silver off a cliff at Alţingi and listen (he was blind) to the people fight for it? Perhaps he was mad that this plan of his was stopped and decided that if he couldn't spend his silver as he wanted, no one could. He was very avengeful, Egill, a real Viking. Once a warriour, now near blind and old, may be that he was just angry or frustrated.

Praise be to Egill!!!

Erlingr Hárbarđarson
Thursday, February 17th, 2005, 02:08 PM
Remember that he first wanted to throw his silver off a cliff at Alţingi and listen (he was blind) to the people fight for it? ...of course, I do. I was foolish to not make a connection from this to his final acts at his deathbed. Well done, a Ghormuil.


Perhaps he was mad that this plan of his was stopped and decided that if he couldn't spend his silver as he wanted, no one could. He was very avengeful, Egill, a real Viking. This makes much sense to the way which he lived his life. Remember you when he and his kinsmen were surrounded and captured in this village, in Danmörk I think, and later under this night, they escaped with aide of a farmhand, and had stolen much booty with out any of the villagers being the wiser. Half-way in return to ships, Egill was so angry that he and his band had taken the booty with out honour and having killed no one for it, that he ran back immediately to the village and before the once celebrating, but now shocked, villagers he stood...and killed them all. Egill was very fond of vengeance, as you had said a Ghormuil...a true Viking.

Náttfari
Thursday, February 17th, 2005, 02:22 PM
Remember you when he and his kinsmen were surrounded and captured in this village, in Danmörk I think, and later under this night, they escaped with aide of a farmhand, and had stolen much booty with out any of the villagers being the wiser. Half-way in return to ships, Egill was so angry that he and his band had taken the booty with out honour and having killed no one for it, that he ran back immediately to the village and before the once celebrating, but now shocked, villagers he stood...and killed them all. Egill was very fond of vengeance, as you had said a Ghormuil...a true Viking.

Aye!!! :viking3:

Erlingr Hárbarđarson
Thursday, February 17th, 2005, 02:47 PM
Remember you when an aged Ţórsteinn, Laxdćla saga, moved out of the distrct to elude conflect with men who wanted to become leading men, and made passage to move his home to Hrappsstađir after that years vorţing? Ţórsteinn was accompanied with eleven kinsmen aboard the ferryboat, with Ţórarinn at helm, to make the move to Hrappsstađir, when the ferryboat came to be under the violent mercy of Breiđafjördur currents and had to be ran agrounde at a skerry where just before they drowned to death in near of Guđmundareyjar...an órkn, larger than any one afore seen, began to swim round the ferryboat over and over, with fins longer than any órkns afore. They say that the eyes at the órkn were as humans eyes, and that the men could not take their eyes away from the sight before them. Just as Ţórsteinn gave word to spear it, albeit to no avail, this monstrous storm struck them and their ferryboat...and killed them.

What does this órkn symbolise? Was the órkn a hamrammr or was it of seiđr from a völva? Why would it taunt such a great man as Ţórsteinn? Was this a test of wisdom for he was so well respected?

I believe that the storm, which greeted them with the warmth of death, arrived because of their wishes to spear the seal-like creature, instead of allowing it to swim free. Perhaps this völva has a connection to the sea and used her connection on her favour after being given threats by spear. Perhaps Ćge or Ran is involved. I am not certain.

Náttfari
Thursday, February 17th, 2005, 03:12 PM
Remember you when an aged Ţórsteinn, Laxdćla saga, moved out of the distrct to elude conflect with men who wanted to become leading men, and made passage to move his home to Hrappsstađir after that years vorţing? Ţórsteinn was accompanied with eleven kinsmen aboard the ferryboat, with Ţórarinn at helm, to make the move to Hrappsstađir, when the ferryboat came to be under the violent mercy of Breiđafjördur currents and had to be ran agrounde at a skerry where just before they drowned to death in near of Guđmundareyjar...an órkn, larger than any one afore seen, began to swim round the ferryboat over and over, with fins longer than any órkns afore. They say that the eyes at the órkn were as humans eyes, and that the men could not take their eyes away from the sight before them. Just as Ţórsteinn gave word to spear it, albeit to no avail, this monstrous storm struck them and their ferryboat...and killed them.

What does this órkn symbolise? Was the órkn a hamrammr or was it of seiđr from a völva? Why would it taunt such a great man as Ţórsteinn? Was this a test of wisdom for he was so well respected?

I believe that the storm, which greeted them with the warmth of death, arrived because of their wishes to spear the seal-like creature, instead of allowing it to swim free. Perhaps this völva has a connection to the sea and used her connection on her favour after being given threats by spear. Perhaps Ćge or Ran is involved. I am not certain.

Twas believed that when men changed to animals, due to being shapeshifters or due to spell, the eyes were the same as in humans. The footnotes in my book suggest that the orkn (seal, for those who are confused) was Víga-Hrappr (Hrappr Sumarliđason, Chapter X), the afturganga or ghost who died and was burried in the kitchen-door of his own house, but his body was exhumed and moved (Chapter XVII); I believe this is true. He caused many deaths and much trouble, it did not stop until Óláfr pái exhumed him (again) and burned his body which was still un-rotted (Chapter XXIV).

Víga-Hrappr did not have any particular grudge against Ţorsteinn, he was just a very evil afturganga (ghost).

Erlingr Hárbarđarson
Thursday, February 17th, 2005, 03:26 PM
Twas believed that when men changed to animals, due to being shapeshifters or due to spell, the eyes were the same as in humans. The footnotes in my book suggest that the orkn (seal, for those who are confused) was Víga-Hrappr (Hrappr Sumarliđason, Chapter X), the afturganga or ghost who died and was burried in the kitchen-door of his own house, but his body was exhumed and moved (Chapter XVII); I believe this is true. He caused many deaths and much trouble, it did not stop until Óláfr pái exhumed him (again) and burned his body which was still un-rotted. I remember all of this and it makes great sense to me. Tis ironic that Víga-Hrappr was of norse-gael, scottish-hebridean blood, and was a complete jerk, haha... :biggrin: Höskuldr should have took his [Hrapps] head as he first fled to Ísland, after having been forced to escape his punishment at the Hebrides, instead of [Höskuldr] awaiting the neighbouring kinsfolk to speak of great ill comfort of Víga-Hrapprs presence!


Víga-Hrappr did not have any particular grudge against Ţorsteinn, he was just a very evil afturganga (ghost)....wel, I never took belief that he was a nice man with a name like Víga-Hrappr, :biggrin: and I do not believe he would be any nicer after such a viking deliverance of death.

anonymaus
Saturday, February 19th, 2005, 08:03 PM
In the Orkneyinga Saga it is written of Torf-Einar's revenge on Halfdan Longlegs:


"Einar had his ribs cut from the spine with a sword and the lungs pulled out through the slits in his back. He dedicated the victim to Odin as a victory offering."


I have found this description:

The Blood Eagle involved the execution of a prisoner of war (usually) by tying him to a stake, his back turned outwards. With a knife, they would cut two slits into victim's back and draw out or expose the lungs to the outside are. As he died, his lungs were said to have fluttered in the wind like the wings of an eagle - thus, the Blood Eagle.

I do not find this very difficult to believe, but it would seem now in modern times it is being denounced as a "literary creation" - Are we to assume, then, that it was never used?

:scratch:

Náttfari
Saturday, February 19th, 2005, 08:36 PM
The Blood Eagle (blóđörn, ađ rista blóđörn=to cut a blood eagle) is mentioned in many places so I doubt that it is just made up. Though prisinors of war may sometimes have been executed in this way, it is so cruel that it was reserved as a method of revenge, especially for father-revenge.

More bloody executions; the Vikings would set up spears and throw infants onto them to kill them. One man who didn't like this was teased and he called Ölvir the infant (Ölvir barnakarl).

Erlingr Hárbarđarson
Saturday, February 19th, 2005, 09:38 PM
In the Orkneyinga Saga... :viking3:


it is written of Torf-Einar's revenge on Halfdan Longlegs:


"Einar had his ribs cut from the spine with a sword and the lungs pulled out through the slits in his back. He dedicated the victim to Odin as a victory offering."


I have found this description:

The Blood Eagle involved the execution of a prisoner of war (usually) by tying him to a stake, his back turned outwards. With a knife, they would cut two slits into victim's back and draw out or expose the lungs to the outside are. As he died, his lungs were said to have fluttered in the wind like the wings of an eagle - thus, the Blood Eagle.

I do not find this very difficult to believe, but it would seem now in modern times it is being denounced as a "literary creation" - Are we to assume, then, that it was never used?

:scratch:

Twas real.

Norse literature has only recently been "praised" by those not of its origo. As soon as norse literature trickled through the grey hands of true scholars and blood-rite followers, the politically correct world, i.e. those who should have been never allowed to read the wisdom and history, caught the scraps and set eyes to some thing of which they knew not afore. When this happened, I am certain that certain elements of the literature were, dare I say "offencive" and "ancestrally oriented", so as to cause poor inferiours to feel...ĺ ja, "discriminated against". :frown: :rolleyes:

In shorts, I believe what you have learnt is but rumour on account of kommunist packaging of our forefathers writings, so as to allow first-rate global shipping to multi-cultural doorsteps every where. I would be not surprised to see in years to come some one to claim the discovery on a lost and sacred negroe saga, entitled, "Buubuumuua the Dark-as-Mud and Unintelligent Gođi of Algeriarfjörđur." :rolleyes: Why would any one wish to change and play with the ancient tekst and wisdoms? Why would our own be foul with betrayl?...kroner. You cannot set a price on purity, but multiculturalism sells for cheap.

The blóđörn sounds a beautiful gift to give to all who sell Óđins word for financial benefit. I would shed no tear...allow the lungs to flap in the breeze as we avenge those who have been dis-honoured.

anonymaus
Saturday, February 19th, 2005, 10:45 PM
Thank you for the answers. I had suspected this idea of "literary invention" was foolishness, as they cannot support their arguments.


I would be not surprised to see in years to come some one to claim the discovery on a lost and sacred negroe saga, entitled, "Buubuumuua the Dark-as-Mud and Unintelligent Gođi of Algeriarfjörđur." :rolleyes:

:rotfl:


The blóđörn sounds a beautiful gift to give to all who sell Óđins word for financial benefit. I would shed no tear...allow the lungs to flap in the breeze as we avenge those who have been dis-honoured.


It does indeed. :viking3:

beowulf wodenson
Sunday, February 20th, 2005, 01:00 AM
Maybe someone already mentioned this, but did not Ivarr the Boneless during the first major danish invasion of England carve the blood-eagle on king Aelle of Northumbria? I seem to remember reading this in a history of the Anglo-Saxons.

Náttfari
Sunday, February 20th, 2005, 01:22 AM
Indeed he did, it is mentioned in Skjöldunga saga (The saga of the Skjöldungs).

There, in Ragnarssona ţáttur (the ţáttur of the sons of Ragnar), this is written:
Ívarr ok ţeir brćđur minntusk nú, hversu fađir ţeira var píndr. Létu ţeir nú rísta örn á baki Ellu ok skera síđan rifin öll frá hrygginum međ sverđi, svá at ţar váru lungun út dregin. Svá segir Sighvatr skáld í Knútsdrápu:

Nú er blóđugr örn
bitrum hjörvi
bana Sigmundar
á baki ristinn.
Ok Ellu bak,
at, lét, hinn er sat,
Ívarr, ara,
Jórvík, skorit.

Eptir ţessa orrostu gerđisk Ívarr konungr yfir ţeim hluta Englands, sem hans frćndr höfđu fyrri átt.

English translation
Ívarr and his brothers now remembered how their father was tortured. Now they had an eagle carved on Ella's back and all the ribs cut from the spine with a sword, so the lungs were dragged out. This is how Sighvatr skáld tells this in the drápa of Knút:

The poem can be summed into this:
And Ívarr, he who sat in York (Jórvík), had carved on the back of Ella, an eagle.

After this battle Ívarr became the king of that part of England that his kinsmen had had before.

Other sagas and poetry mention the blood eagle aswell, and in the books I read it is said that this method of execution is used only for revenging a father or a fóstbróđir so I doubt that this was used on prisoners of war.

Erlingr Hárbarđarson
Sunday, February 20th, 2005, 02:02 AM
Other sagas and poetry mention the blood eagle aswell, and in the books I read it is said that this method of execution is used only for revenging a father or a fóstbróđir so I doubt that this was used on prisoners of war.

Indeed, a Ghormuil, fóstbrćđralag is to be praised and for such a bond to be severed is only worthy of a blóđörn! Take blood when blood is taken...

Náttfari
Sunday, February 20th, 2005, 02:18 AM
I would shed no tear...allow the lungs to flap in the breeze as we avenge those who have been dis-honoured.

And then make skálar (bowls) from their skulls to drink mead from... or we could eat icecream from them...

Erlingr Hárbarđarson
Friday, March 4th, 2005, 08:41 PM
I always learnt to praise the death ceremony of the pyre, allthough whilst reading the sagas one reads only of burial mounds or death celebrations upon ship-out-to-sea. When did we adopt the burial? And why? We were burying the Fallen afore our contacts with other faiths, so I do not believe tis an influence from the christens and so forth.

Erlingr Hárbarđarson
Friday, March 4th, 2005, 09:19 PM
I thought it so beautiful as Gestr (Oddleifsson) fell ill and died (Laxdćla K. 66) under the same Winter as Ósvífr -with whom he shared a grave- and as his son Ţórdur upheld his promise to bury his father at Helgafell, met the shores winds and a storm of such magnitude that no one could travel the frosen waters, but the day Gestrs body was to be set afree, had the storm ceased and all the ices moved seawards. The day after his burial the storm returned ices to the waters of Breiđafjörđur and thereby preventing travells for the remainder of Winter.

Twas an omen this chance to transport Gestrs body! But an omen of what? What did the ceasing of the Winter forces symbolise? Who was ahinde this?! Was Sifs son Ullr the omens bringer? We know that he hunts with Skađi upon Wintertimes and was away from Niflheim at the time of Ósvífrs and Gestrs passing. What do my swornbretheren think on this?

Praise be to Gestr(!) on this night for his cleverness in dream and destiny (especially with Guđrún!) and to Ósvífr(!) for bearing such fine kinsfolk to our seed, Ósvífrssynir!!!

Náttfari
Friday, March 4th, 2005, 09:22 PM
Aye!!!

:viking3:

p.s. har du glemt mine private meldinger? :)

Erlingr Hárbarđarson
Friday, March 4th, 2005, 09:35 PM
Remember you the compensation bloodmission headed by Ţorgils at Guđrúns behalf to kill Helgi? I know, I do not like to speak on this either as tis up-setting, but...how had Ţorgils survived the blow dealt from Húnbogi den Barske, who had charged before him and swung his axe splitting his spine in two and leaving a hole at the centre of Ţorgils back? Afore the back wound, Ţorgils had as well his foot severed off by Helgis wooden axe, and still was of ability to ride in return to Guđrún, of course to learn of her trickery, but had survived the attack and most severe of wounds.

:speechles

We should have been there inside the sheiling to aide bróđir Helgi in making defence! Blood praise be to his strength and valour!!!

Erlingr Hárbarđarson
Friday, March 4th, 2005, 09:42 PM
Aye!!!

:viking3:

p.s. har du glemt mine private meldinger? :)

;) Ikke ennĺ men jeg skal snart gjřre det.

Erlingr Hárbarđarson
Friday, March 4th, 2005, 10:08 PM
Remember you the day afore Ţorgils (Höllusonar) -accompanied by Halldór amoungest others- was to pay compensation to Helgis sons at alţingi, and he had hung his black hoodcloak at the wall to dry and it spoke such a mysterious, worrisome verse? (K. 67) The people wondered as to the cloaks wisdom. What meaning held the verse? Particularly the latter two lines. Allthough but four lines in length, I can not help but feel its weight in golds. And allthough I am certain twas bound in foresight to the viking deed made by Ţórarinns son but a day later, I am not certain of its meaning ayonder this.

Náttfari
Friday, March 4th, 2005, 10:24 PM
The cloak is blue in my tekst.

In Icelandic:
Hangir vót á vegg,
veit hattkilan bragđ,
ţvígit optar ţurr,
ţeygi dylk, at hon viti tvau.

Anglish:
Wet on the wall it hangs
yet knows of wiles, this hood;
it will not dry again,
I do not hide that it knows of two.

The cloak says it knows two wiles. Those are the betrayals of Snorri, first the víg of Helgi Harđbeinsson, the other the víg of Ţorgils himself.

Erlingr Hárbarđarson
Friday, March 4th, 2005, 10:50 PM
The cloak is blue in my tekst.

In Icelandic:
Hangir vót á vegg,
veit hattkilan bragđ,
ţvígit optar ţurr,
ţeygi dylk, at hon viti tvau.

Anglish:
Wet on the wall it hangs
yet knows of wiles, this hood;
it will not dry again,
I do not hide that it knows of two.

The cloak says it knows two wiles. Those are the betrayals of Snorri, first the víg of Helgi Harđbeinsson, the other the víg of Ţorgils himself.

Beautiful, a Ghormuil. What do you understand of..."ţvígit optar ţurr"? Perhaps that its wearer [Ţorgils] wil never again wear it, and shal therefor never dry, for his head is to be taken by Ţórarinns son?

Náttfari
Friday, March 4th, 2005, 10:56 PM
Yes, I do believe it to be so, 'twill not be used again for the owner is to be killed.

Schutz_Staffeln
Monday, March 7th, 2005, 11:37 AM
Given that i consider myself always a student of history what sources could everyone refer me to either on the internet or books

Sources that are in english would be perfer but German text are ok to.

Mainly i'm after the sagas, poems, and anything to go with nordic religions. Also im interested in which set of Runes everyone would consider best to learn or study?


P.s accurate translations would also be nice to ;)

Lundi
Monday, March 7th, 2005, 01:18 PM
Here are two too start you off, Orkneyingers Saga and The Poetic Edda, the Eddas are a set of poems full of wisdom and enlightenment. These have all been given their Anglo spelling, as horrendous as that looks to an Icelander :icon_arro

:icon12:

The Orkneyingers Saga

Introduction (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/ice/is3/is301.htm)
The Orkneyingers’ Saga (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/ice/is3/is302.htm)
The Story of Earl Magnus (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/ice/is3/is303.htm)
The Story of Earl Rognvald (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/ice/is3/is304.htm)

The Poetic Edda

General Introduction (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe02.htm)
Voluspo (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe03.htm)
Hovamol (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe04.htm)
Vafthruthnismol (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe05.htm)
Grimnismol (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe06.htm)
Skirnismol (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe07.htm)
Harbarthsljoth (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe08.htm)
Hymiskvitha (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe09.htm)
Lokasenna (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe10.htm)
Thrymskvitha (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe11.htm)
Alvissmol (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe12.htm)
Baldrs Draumar (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe13.htm)
Rigsthula (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe14.htm)
Hyndluljoth (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe15.htm)
Svipdagsmol (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe16.htm)
Völundarkvitha (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe17.htm)
Helgakvitha Hjorvarthssonar (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe18.htm)
Helgakvitha Hundingsbana I (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe19.htm)
Helgakvitha Hundingsbana II (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe20.htm)
Fra Dautha Sinfjotla (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe21.htm)
Gripisspo (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe22.htm)
Reginsmol (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe23.htm)
Fafnismol (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe24.htm)
Sigrdrifumol (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe25.htm)
Brot Af Sigurtharkvithu (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe26.htm)
Guthrunarkvitha I (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe27.htm)
Sigurtharkvitha En Skamma (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe28.htm)
Helreith Brynhildar (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe29.htm)
Drap Niflunga (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe30.htm)
Guthrunarkvitha II, En Forna (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe31.htm)
Guthrunarkvitha III (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe32.htm)
Oddrunargratr (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe33.htm)
Atlakvitha En Grönlenzka (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe34.htm)
Atlamol En Grönlenzku (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe35.htm)
Guthrunarhvot (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe36.htm)
Hamthesmol (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/poe37.htm)


These are just part of the Sagas, but I recommend you read these since they are very fun to read and full of knowledge (preferably learn Icelandic first and grab a print of them in their original form :icon_bigg )

Schutz_Staffeln
Tuesday, March 8th, 2005, 05:48 AM
These are just part of the Sagas, but I recommend you read these since they are very fun to read and full of knowledge (preferably learn Icelandic first and grab a print of them in their original form :icon_bigg )[/QUOTE]


Hahaha its on my to do list at somepoint in time after i learn Swedish and everything else ;) .Hmmm plus i dont think i have actually even seen Icelandic as a language course anywhere before down here.

As for the links thank you very much that will be a great help even though they are only in English ;). I'll start reading them in my off time :viking1:

Náttfari
Tuesday, March 8th, 2005, 03:27 PM
One note, I might add. That link Lundi provided has crap-spelling, not at all like the Icelandic text.

Hyndluljodh!? Hyndluljóđ, please... and Voluspo! Völuspá!!!

Also, there are actually three types of text, raw manuscript text (which no one but scholars read), normalised text (based on the writing time of the stories) and modern text. I hate the modern text but it is mostly used; I find the normalised text the best and most fun to read.

I'm going to give one example, from Völuspá.

Manuscript:
Hlióđs biđ ek allar
helgar kindir
meiri ok minni
mögo Heimdallar
vilto at ek Váföđrs
vel fram telia
forn spiöll fira
ţau er ek fremst um man.

Normalised text:
Hljóđs biđ ek allar,
helgar kindir,
meiri ok minni
mögu Heimdallar.
Viltu at ek Valföđr,
vel fyr telja
forn spjöll fira,
ţau er fremst um man.

Modern:
Hljóđs biđ ég allar
helgar kindir,
meiri og minni
mögu Heimdallar.
Viltu ađ ég, Valföđur,
vel fyr telja
forn spjöll fira,
ţau er fremst um man.

I recommend to any foreigner learning Icelandic to read them with the modern text, unless they want to struggle through it.

Náttfari
Tuesday, March 8th, 2005, 03:29 PM
And Skadi, if you want to use the Icelandic characters, you should also use the Icelandic words. :tongue: Miđgarđur and Ásgarđur.

Erlingr Hárbarđarson
Sunday, September 18th, 2005, 04:20 PM
Could any one figure out the riddles of Vafţrúđnismál without reading further verse? I could never answer correct to any of the lore from the ţurs, but from Hárbarđr I had figured only two. Wisdom of vćttir astound me; even Frigg was sceptical of 'Gagnráđr' travelling to the Hall of ţursar. Frigg kvađ 'heima letja ek mynda Heriaföđr í görđom gođa, ţvíat engi iötun ek hugđa iafnramman sem Vafţrúđni vera.' Naturally, He rides and enters the Hall, " . . . at höllu hann kom, ok átti Íms fađir; inn gekk Yggr ţegar." How did your wit prevail? f.eks. seg ţú mér, Gagnráđr, alls ţú á gólfi vill ţíns of freista frama, hvé sá hestr heitir er hverjan dregr dag of dróttmögu . . . seg ţú ţat, Gagnráđr, alls ţú á gólfi vill ţíns of freista frama, hvé sú á heitir, er deilir međ jötna sonum grund ok međ gođum. But I dare not ask that of Baldr which even the ţurs could not.

Do you believe He referred to the same mystery of Him Self in Hávamál as to above with that of Baldrs pyre? Recall the Runic Poem, 'Ţat kann ek it átjánda, er ek ćva kennik, mey né manns konu, alt er betra, er einn um kann, ţat fylgir ljóđa lokum . . . '