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Loki
Saturday, December 18th, 2004, 06:19 PM
RACIAL TYPES IN ANCIENT GREECE


http://www.white-history.com/hellenes_files/girl01.jpghttp://www.white-history.com/hellenes_files/girl02.jpg

Two beautiful statues, the right circa 530 BC, the left circa 500 BC, on display in the Acropolis Museum, Athens. (‘The Acropolis – the archeological site and the museum’, Dr. Demetrios Papstamos, Archeologist, published by Olympic Color, Athens, Greece)







THE FOLLOWING WORK COMES WITH THANKS FROM THE RESEARCH OF KARL EARLSON



SKELETAL ANALYSIS REVEALS RACIAL NATURE OF HELLENIC SOCIETY

One of the most complete studies ever undertaken of racial types in Ancient Hellas was done by the American anthropologist J. L. Angel, who performed an extensive survey of all ancient Greek crania.

Angel (1944), calculated that during the Classical period of Greek history (650-150 BC), 27% of the Greek population had been predominantly Nordic in type. This is perfectly in line with other observations, which have determined that the Hellenic population consisted of two, possibly three elements initially: Nordics, Mediterraneans and Alpine types. Only later were non-European elements introduced, mainly through the importation of slaves.

Angel observed that prior to the Classical period, the Nordic element had been larger, and that after it, the element in question had declined. [Angel (1943; 1944; 1945; 1946a, b, c.] Angel (1971), also noted that the immigrant Indo-Europeans, were of Nordic subrace.

Peterson (1974), studied portrait busts of famous ancient Greek personages, and concluded that the aristocracies of Hellas were a product of closely interbreeding, Eupatrid clans. These clans were mostly Nordic in type, being largely descended from the Indo-European invaders.

The study of Greek literature which Sieglin (1935) performed, has demonstrated that many individuals in the elites of ancient Greece, had blond or red hair. For instance, Alcibiades, Alexander the Great, Critias, Demetrius of Phalerum, King Lysimachus, Ptolemy II, Philadelphus and King Pyrrhus, were all fair-haired individuals. Dionysius I, the ruler of Syracuse, had blond hair and freckles, whilst the Athenian playwright Euripides, also had a fair and freckled complexion. [Gunther (1956).]


HELLENIC IDEAL WAS NORDIC

Indeed, the Greek orator Dio of Prusa noted that the Greek ideal of beauty was a Nordic one. The Greeks, he said, admired the blond Achilles, but thought that the barbarian Trojan Hector, was black-haired. [Günther (1956).]

In his "Argonautica," the Greek poet Apollonius Rhodius, describes the hero Jason, and all fifty of the Argonauts, as blond-haired. [Sieglin (1935).]

When the heroine Electra, in Euripides' play of that name, finds a lock of her brother Orestes' hair, on the grave of their father Agamemnon, she can tell that it is his hair, because of its distinctive blond color. [Ridgeway (1909).]

The poet Bacchylides said that the women of Sparta were blonde, and Dicaearchus said much the same thing about the women of Thebes. [Gunther (1956).]

For the Greeks, the most beautiful woman who ever lived, Helen, was a blond, as were those mythical men such as Adonis, who were famed for their handsomeness. [Sieglin (1935).]


HFK GŰNTHER'S WORKS

Although a Nordicist, and thus disparaging of White non-Nordic inputs into Hellenic society, Günther's works on the subject of Greek racial history (1927; 1928; 1929a, b; 1956; 1961), are particularly valuable. Günther performed a detailed analysis of Greek history, from a biological perspective. Utilizing craniological, literary, and pictorial evidence, he reconstructed the racial structure of ancient Greece. He concluded that the Nordic sub-race formed something of an ideal for the Greeks, and that the Nordic element was more influential than any other. At the summit of its achievements, Greece possessed a large Nordic element, but as this element declined, so did Greek culture and civilization.


"WHERE THE HELLENIC RACE HAS BEEN KEPT PURE"

In the 4th Century AD, the Jewish physician Adamantios, described what he called the "true Greek" – or where the “Hellenic race has been kept pure” as follows:

"Wherever the Hellenic and Ionic race has been kept pure, we see proper tall men of fairly broad and straight build, neatly made, of fairly light skin and blond; the flesh is rather firm, the limbs straight, the extremities well made. The head is of middling size, and moves very easily; the neck is strong, the hair somewhat fair, and soft, and a little curly; the face is rectangular, the lips narrow, the nose straight, and the eyes bright, piercing, and full of light; for of all nations the Greek has the fairest eyes." [Günther (1927) 157.]

This quote is interesting as it shows that even then – some 800 years after the end of Hellenic Classical period – some Nordic Greek elements had survived. These elements can, of course, still be seen today as well, although much reduced in numbers.

For more literary descriptions of pigmentation in ancient Greek poetry and prose, as well as craniological evidence, the following works are recommended: De Lapouge (1899), Jax (1933), Myres (1930), Reche (1936) and Ridgeway (1901).


References:

- Jax, K. (1933) "Die weibliche Schonheit in der griechischen Dichtung." (Innsbruck: Universitats-Verlag Wagner).
- Myres, J. L. (1930) "Who Were the Greeks?" (Berkeley: University of California Press).
- Reche, O. (1936) "Rasse und Heimat der Indogermanen." (Munich: J. F. Lehmanns Verlag).
- Ridgeway, W. (1901) "The Early Age of Greece, Volume I." (London: Cambridge University Press).
- Sieglin, W. (1935) "Die blonden Haare der indogermanischen Volker des Altertums." (Munich: J. F. Lehmanns Verlag).


Articles

- Angel, J. L. (1943) "Ancient Cephallenians: The Population of a Mediterranean Island." American Journal of Physical Anthropology, I, 229-260.
- Angel, J. L. (1944) "A Racial Analysis of the Ancient Greeks: An Essay on the Use of Morphological Types." American Journal of Physical Anthropology, II, 329-376.
- Angel, J. L. (1945) "Skeletal Material From Attica." Hesperia, XIV, 279-363.
- Angel, J. L. (1946a) "Race, Type, and Ethnic Group in Ancient Greece." Human Biology, XVIII, 1-32.
- Angel, J. L. (1946b) "Skeletal Change in Ancient Greece." American Journal of Physical Anthropology, IV, 69-97.
- Angel, J. L. (1946c) "Social Biology of Greek Culture Growth." American Anthropologist, XLVIII, 493-533.
- Günther, H. F. K. (1961) "Like a Greek God.... Translated by Vivian Bird from Professor Hans F. K. Guenther's 'Rassenkunde des Hellenischen Volkes'." Northern World, VI (1), 5-16.
- Moonwomon, B. (1994) "Color Categorization in Early Greek." Journal of Indo-European Studies, XXII, 37-65.
- Peterson, R. (1974) "The Greek Face." Journal of Indo-European Studies, II, 385-406.
- Ridgeway, W. (1909) "The Relation of Anthropology to Classical Studies." Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, XXXIX, 10-25.


Source: http://www.white-history.com/hellenes.htm (http://forums.skadi.net/redirector.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.whit e-history.com%2Fhellenes.htm)

Loki
Saturday, December 18th, 2004, 06:23 PM
This quote is interesting as it shows that even then – some 800 years after the end of Hellenic Classical period – some Nordic Greek elements had survived. These elements can, of course, still be seen today as well, although much reduced in numbers.

Indeed, one such fine example is our dear friend Blood-Axis. :)

Stig NHF
Sunday, December 19th, 2004, 10:41 AM
Its actually kind of sad to think about these things. Imagine the fact that a couple thousand years ago , one could walk from Marocco to India and still only be in IE lands. It has been a slow retreat back into Europa, and now finally we are actually being invaded here too. This is the last stand, there is nowhere left to run for our people. This is why we have to take a final stand now otherwise we will fade from history like a forgotten shadow, only the ruins showing what the world was once like.

Loki
Sunday, December 19th, 2004, 10:53 AM
Its actually kind of sad to think about these things. Imagine the fact that a couple thousand years ago , one could walk from Marocco to India and still only be in IE lands. It has been a slow retreat back into Europa, and now finally we are actually being invaded here too. This is the last stand, there is nowhere left to run for our people. This is why we have to take a final stand now otherwise we will fade from history like a forgotten shadow, only the ruins showing what the world was once like.
Absolutely! I couldn't agree more.

We have nowhere left to run. If something drastic is not done very soon, then all that will be left of Nordic Scandinavia (and Nordish Europe) will be artefacts that show blond and blue-eyed people that once were, but no more - like the statue in the first post.

NormanBlood
Saturday, January 15th, 2005, 02:31 PM
In the 4th Century AD, the Jewish physician Adamantios, described what he called the "true Greek" – or where the “Hellenic race has been kept pure” as follows:



"Wherever the Hellenic and Ionic race has been kept pure, we see proper tall men of fairly broad and straight build, neatly made, of fairly light skin and blond; the flesh is rather firm, the limbs straight, the extremities well made. The head is of middling size, and moves very easily; the neck is strong, the hair somewhat fair, and soft, and a little curly; the face is rectangular, the lips narrow, the nose straight, and the eyes bright, piercing, and full of light; for of all nations the Greek has the fairest eyes." [Günther (1927) 157.]

Hmm...strange, I am quite sure that quote is attributed to Hesiod, not Adamantios. I did a project on the invasion of the Northern Hellenic lands from the North before the peek of Ancient Greece and I used the quote from a rather informative book I found at UofT which marked Hesiod as the origin of the quote.

Nevertheless, from the research I did in the past on the Ancient Hellenics the issue on their ideals, attributes etc. is quite complex. Mostly that you had those who had retreated to the South of the region due to a desaster of sorts in the North of the region. Also that you had a group, perhaps those attributed with "always" being there who would move back and forth from nowaday Hellenic lands to Asia Minor. Then you have a the tribes taking advantage of the abandoned northern region. So, as I was saying you could have to groups. A group that would be a prime example of a Mediterranean people, and those with Nordish features. Which is why there of course is a presence of both in Hellenic art. And we also have to have a bit of an understanding on why certain colouring in certain places in Ancient Hellenic art. Its unfortunate I don't have my folder here with me left over from my Classics courses hehe. There are some amazing examples.

Nordgau
Sunday, January 16th, 2005, 05:12 PM
The exact source which Günther gives is Adamantios, Physiognomiká II, 32 (Rassenkunde des hellenischen Volkes, Pähl ²1965, p. 275). There is some more similar material in that chapter, e.g. of Polemon of Ilion. Maybe Hesiod also also wrote something similar. Unfortunately, Günther's book has no name index, and in a fast look through it I didn't find any corresponding quote of Hesiod. A fast search for a corresponding quote of Hesiod in Wilhelm Sieglin (Die blonden Haare der indogermanischen Völker des Altertums, Munich 1935), a collection of all citations about hair colour of ancient writers, was also negative.

Blood_Axis
Tuesday, May 17th, 2005, 09:23 PM
Indeed, one such fine example is our dear friend Blood-Axis. :)I never saw that post before... :icon_redf

:hug: