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View Full Version : Ancient Teuton/Celt Crossbreeding



Eiserner Adler
Sunday, November 21st, 2004, 02:14 PM
Does anyone on here have any good information as too the frequency, if it occured at all, of Teutons who were just moveing into the Germania area before the time of Christ, crossbreeding with the Celts who already inhabited the area? I am of all German ancestry and have always wondered about this. Whether it could be assumed that with however many ancestors one has goeing back 2000 years ago or more, that a good portion of Germans might have same Celtic blood mixed in way back in those times. Any thoughts?

Milesian
Sunday, November 21st, 2004, 10:07 PM
http://www.wsu.edu:8080/~dee/MA/GERMANS.HTM



I don't know the extent of any cross-breeding that occurred, but some think that the Germanic culture derived from earlier Celtic culture -


... By the start of the Middle Ages, the Celts had been struck on two fronts by two very powerful cultures, Rome in the south, and the Germans, who were derived from Celtic culture, from the north.....



..From this great culture would arise the Germans (we think) and many of the cultural forms, ideas, and values of medieval Europe. For not only did medieval Europe look back to the Celtic world as a golden age of Europe, they also lived with social structures and world views that ultimately owe their origin to the Celts as well as to the Romans and Greeks....


.... the Celtic way of life, Celtic institutions, and the Celtic world view were superimposed onto Germanic and classical culture. The later monolithic European culture is greatly influenced by these early peoples.....



....The migrations of the early centuries AD, of course, involved four major peoples: the Alans, the Huns, the Germans, and, in the final stage, Slavic peoples. These were all distinct migrations but were intimately tied with one another. The Hunnish invasions, for instance, in part impelled the Alanic and Germanic expansions; the Germanic expansions in their turn displaced some of the Slavs who migrated into Europe. By far the most important peoples in these migrations were the Germanic tribes.

The origins of these tribes are shrouded in mystery. They were most likely a people derived from the Celts, but they have much in common with other European cultures, such as the Illyrians and the Veneti. For the most part, the term "Germanic" is almost entirely a linguistic rather than a cultural term—it refers mainly to the tribal groups in Europe that spoke similar languages, Germanic, that had been derived from Celtic sources. Germanic languages probably came into existence around the second century BC—that is, they became distinct from Celtic languages......



........Archaeologists put the geographical origin of the Germanic peoples in southern Scandinavia and northern Germany. There, they developed a warrior culture that was essentially democratic in character. As they migrated south and east, this democratic warrior society developed into a kingship and, as they came in contact with the Romans and Romanized Celts, they developed further aristocratic classes among the warriors and nobility........


....As the tribes came into increasing contact with Rome and Romanized Celts, they began to adopt much of the material technology and culture of Rome, substantially increasing their efficiency as agricultural producers. In addition, they developed their own system of writing, runic writing, sometime around the third century AD. Even with this writing, the Germanic tribes remained largely oral cultures.......



.....The Germanic tribes would have been just a footnote in history had it not been for the Gothic tribes, for these tribes overran the western Empire of Rome and permanently set Europe on a new cultural trajectory.

The Goths originally migrated from Scandinavia and from there migrated south into Europe and east into southern Russia........