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NormanBlood
Wednesday, December 24th, 2003, 06:50 AM
Here is a thread for us to discuss our favourite Germanic musicians, composers and anything else related to Germanic music.

To start off, what do you all think of Teutonic composers such as Edvard Grieg, Richard Wagner(actually Wagner is a very interesting figure...perhaps a good starting point to an interesting conversation?), Ludwig van Beethoven and others?

Also, what do you think of the essay Wagner wrote "Judaism(or Jewry) in Music"? Judaism in Music (http://users.belgacom.net/wagnerlibrary/prose/wagjuda.htm) What do you think of his opinion on Mendelssohn?

Pomor
Wednesday, December 24th, 2003, 08:00 AM
I personally love Grieg, much more than I do Wagner. An incredibly beatiful and spiritually rich music, very Northern :-). Skryabin and Rachmaninov go after him.

friedrich braun
Wednesday, December 24th, 2003, 09:49 AM
Nice article on music in the Third Reich

Wilhelm Furtwängler and Music in the Third Reich

Antony Charles

Not only during his lifetime, but also in the decades since his death in 1954, Wilhelm Furtwängler has been globally recognized as one of the greatest musicians of this century, above all as the brilliant primary conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic orchestra, which he lead from 1922 to 1945, and again after 1950. On his death, the Encyclopaedia Britannica commented: "By temperament a Wagnerian, his restrained dynamism, superb control of his orchestra and mastery of sweeping rhythms also made him an outstanding exponent of Beethoven." Furtwängler was also a composer of merit

Underscoring his enduring greatness have been several recent in-depth biographies and a successful 1996 Broadway play, "Taking Sides," that portrays his postwar "denazification" purgatory, as well as steadily strong sales of CD recordings of his performances (some of them available only in recent years). Furtwängler societies are active in the United States, France, Britain, Germany and other countries. His overall reputation, however, especially in America, is still a controversial one.

Following the National Socialist seizure of power in 1933, some prominent musicians -- most notably such Jewish artists as Bruno Walter, Otto Klemperer and Arnold Schoenberg -- left Germany. Most of the nation's musicians, however, including the great majority of its most gifted musical talents, remained -- and even flourished. With the possible exception of the composer Richard Strauss, Furtwängler was the most prominent musician to stay and "collaborate."

Consequently, discussion of his life -- even today -- still provokes heated debate about the role of art and artists under Hitler and, on a more fundamental level, about the relationship of art and politics.

http://64.143.9.197/jhr/v17/v17n3p-2_Charles.html

Julius
Wednesday, December 24th, 2003, 12:20 PM
Wagner, Beethoven, Bach, Grieg (Norway), et al. are all great!

Some less known or less recognized composers:

Carl Orff 1895-1982 (Germany)

http://www.br-online.de/kultur-szene/klassik/pages/ro/spezial/50jahre/img/orff.jpg

His work Carmina Burana (http://members.ozemail.com.au/~caveman/Carmina/) is quite good. I'm not sure about his real political conviction, but he never left the Third Reich. In fact, Carmina Burana was introduced there in 1937.

Wilhelm Peterson-Berger 1867-1942 (Sweden)

http://hem.passagen.se/wilhelm.peterson-berger/bilder/pb.gif

Our Swedish Wagner. He was a Nietzschean racialist but a member of the Social Democratic Workers Party. Influenced by Wagner, Beethoven and Grieg he wrote perhaps the most typical Swedish music.

Hugo Alfvén 1872-1960 (Sweden)

http://www.alfvensallskapet.se/bilder/taegt.jpg

"Few Swedish composers have achieved such widespread popularity both at home and abroad as Hugo Alfvén, and his compositions have come to stand out as the most typically representative examples of national romanticism in Swedish music.

Nevertheless, strictly speaking, his reputation rests on relatively few but often performed works such as Midsommarvaka (Midsummer Vigil), Festspel (Festival), Elegy, Vallflickans dans (The Shepherd-girl's Dance), Sveriges Flagga (Sweden's Flag) and Roslagsvår (Spring in Roslag) together with a few songs, such as Skogen sover (The Forest Sleeps) and Du är stilla ro (You are Tranquil Peace), and several well-known folk song arrangements for choir."

[...]

The darknes in our temperament and in the Swede's melancholic character

Alfvén is often regarded as a "festival" composer, and it is true to say that it is the display of colour in his orchestra works, and the "Great-Swedish" magnificence of many of his vocal works that have made the greatest impression on the public. But even if he willingly accepted this as his role during the later years, and in addition often stressed the importance of trying to give people light and warmth in his music - as stated in an interview in 1942 - nevertheless, the real basis of his music is something quite different. Throughout his whole output, under the surface there is a stream of anxiety, and he stressed continually, either directly or indirectly, that the counterpart of life is death.It is almost as if in his striving after beauty and technical perfection, he wanted to invoke perishableness. The hymn, I walk towards death, wherever I walk, which is used in the second symphony in the 1890's played a similarly large role in the fifth symphony fifty years later."

(source: The Hugo Alfvén Society (http://www.alfvensallskapet.se/Eindex.htm))


I recommend this FAQ (http://www.faqs.org/faqs/music/classical-faq/index.html) as an introduction to classical music in general.

NormanBlood
Friday, December 26th, 2003, 05:20 AM
Julius, Alfven was a great composer! Funny you should mention his "Midsummer Vigil" just as I finished listening to it lol


Other good Germanic composers are: Johan Halvorsen, Wilhelm Stenhammer and Carl Nielsen.

Wend, Grieg was indeed amazing. His "Elfin Dance", "Norwegian Dance", "In the Hall of the Mountain King" and "Death of the Ase" are all very beautiful. He definetly deserves(ed) more credit.

Mac Seafraidh
Friday, December 26th, 2003, 06:43 AM
I enjoy listening to Wagner,Beethoven,Mozart,etc.

HEIL NSBM -/-

The Blond Beast
Monday, December 29th, 2003, 06:16 PM
I enjoy listening to Wagner,Beethoven,Mozart,etc.

HEIL NSBM -/-

What about Mendelssohn? ; )

Dr. Solar Wolff
Tuesday, December 30th, 2003, 04:45 AM
Wagner's music is so far above any other composer or music that comparing Wagner to other German composers is like comparing Germanic music to rap music. Wagner invented whole instruments when he needed a particular sound. Wagner invented the Lietmotiv. Most importantly, Wagner's music reaches deep down to the DNA and resonates emotionally to one's entire being if he or she is attuned to it. Wagner is like a test. He lets you know who you are. He is unashamedly playing to the Germanic soul. I can't believe that anyone with a drop of Germanic blood in his veins can't hear this call.

NormanBlood
Friday, January 2nd, 2004, 04:48 AM
Dr. Solar Wolff, I agree with you. Its unfortunate, the bad name that is put on him today by many an "intellectual" which only serves in driving people away from his music. What did you think of his article 'Judaism In Music'? At one point he stated that a Jew, such as Mendelssohn, do not have the capability, nomatter the amount of technical skill, to create music truly FOR the European people. And I do agree. And how could Mendelssohn be expected to? Wagner created what was in his own soul, and therefore what is in the soul of the Germanic.

Dr. Solar Wolff
Friday, January 9th, 2004, 07:28 AM
I fully agree NormanBlood. Wagner was able to reach deep within himself and to tap his soul as well as the souls of his people going back into time. When we hear music intended to depict the forest, we can see it in our mind's eye. It is the same as the Gods go over the rainbow bridge to Valhalla or any scene Wagner "paints" in music. Wagner also paints emotion. His Lietmotiv carry the idea of a person or thing but also carry the emotion built up in the course of the story concerning that person. His music is beautiful, by anyone's standard and that beauty also carries an emotional impact.

Wagner hated Jews and was loved by Adolf Hitler. That double whammy makes his very name an obscenity among "intellectuals" or, more probably, anyone trying to impress Jews. And that is exactly what I ask anyone who says anything against Wagner---if he honestly dislikes Wagner's music or is he being "Jewish Correct". I don't recommend this behavior, but I am at a point in life where impressing others has no meaning, personally or financially.

Annikaspapa
Monday, April 19th, 2004, 08:27 PM
Wagner's music is so far above any other composer...

... I can't believe that anyone with a drop of Germanic blood in his veins can't hear this call.
Agreed. It's also important to familiarize oneself with those who influenced the Master - first and foremost, Carl Maria von Weber.

http://www.karadar.com/Dictionary/weber.html
http://www.webergesellschaft.de/
http://www.classiccat.net/weber_cm_von/allmp3.htm

AryanKrieger
Tuesday, April 27th, 2004, 08:03 PM
Wagner's music is so far above any other composer or music that comparing Wagner to other German composers is like comparing Germanic music to rap music. Wagner invented whole instruments when he needed a particular sound. Wagner invented the Lietmotiv. Most importantly, Wagner's music reaches deep down to the DNA and resonates emotionally to one's entire being if he or she is attuned to it. Wagner is like a test. He lets you know who you are. He is unashamedly playing to the Germanic soul. I can't believe that anyone with a drop of Germanic blood in his veins can't hear this call.


Absolutely! Wagner is the epitome of all things Germanic and Aryan. To know the Aryan soul is to know Wagner and to know Wagner is to know the Aryan soul.
Without a shadow of a doubt Wagner was sent by our gods for the distinct purpose of creating an Awakening in the Ario-Germanic Collective Unconscious.

Mistress Klaus
Wednesday, April 28th, 2004, 03:46 AM
Beethoven and Bach are my favourites. Wagner is a late comer compared to these greats...but still awe-inspiring all the same. :)

I will always regard Beethoven the composer with the most passion & fury...a reflection of his life. ;)

Skando-naivian-Girl
Wednesday, June 2nd, 2004, 04:50 PM
German contribution to Music can not be over exaggerated.

My personal favorites and whom I consider the best are Mozart,Beethoven, Handel and Bach.

Though One of my Favorite classical compositions Cannon in D is by Pachabell.

Does anyone know where he's from, his heritage?

Rodskarl Dubhgall
Thursday, June 3rd, 2004, 03:03 AM
Ride of the Valkyries!
Morgenstemning!

Annikaspapa
Thursday, June 3rd, 2004, 05:09 AM
...one of my Favorite classical compositions Cannon in D is by Pachabell.

Does anyone know where he's from, his heritage?


No worries - he fits nicely into this thread...

Johann Pachelbel

1653-1706
Like Allegri, whose famed Miserere eclipsed everything else he achieved in his career, Johann Pachelbel's name is automatically linked to the ever-popular three- part Canon in D. Born in Nürnberg in the autumn of 1653, Pachelbel showed an early appetite for learning. In addition to school, he had two music teachers, one who introduced him to the fundamentals of music while the other taught him to play and compose. He was briefly at the University of Altdorf before taking a position in 1673 as assistant organist at the cathedral of St Stephen in Vienna. Four years later he became the court organist to the Duke of Saxe-Eisenach. He became restless here, and requesting a letter of reference from his employers, left after a year. His reference described him as a 'rare and perfect virtuoso'.

Subsequently Pachelbel became the organist at the Erfurt Predigerkirche, where he spent 12 happy years. His first wife succumbed to the plague, but within a year he had remarried and subsequently had seven children. This period was a time of increasing contentment and creative growth. In 1690, he became organist in Stuttgart at the Wurttemberg Court. The threat of a French invasion curtailed this position two years later, and Pachelbel returned to his hometown of Nuremberg to take up the post of organist at St Sebald. There he lived out his final decade writing ever more imposing works.

It is not known when Pachelbel composed his famous Canon. The work is scored for three violins and continuo, each violin entering in turn and elaborating on a simple theme as the piece gathers in strength and builds to a climax. But Pachelbel's importance is, in fact, perhaps greater as a composer for the organ; his chorale preludes, based on hymn tunes, strongly influenced J.S. Bach. He was also the author of a great many motets, arias and Masses, and 13 Magnificats which feature solo singers and a choir as well as an orchestra often including wind and brass. His body of work reflects the cultural contrasts between his own Protestant ways and those of the higher Church, and certainly deserves to be known at least as well as his celebrated Canon.

Skando-naivian-Girl
Friday, June 4th, 2004, 12:02 AM
thanks for the detailed yet concise info on Pachelbel.

Schwarze Division
Monday, June 7th, 2004, 04:26 PM
My favourites are Richard Wagner Anton Bruckner.

Tommy Vercetti
Monday, June 7th, 2004, 06:22 PM
Jessica Wagner aka Blümchen and Dune

Johannes de León
Monday, June 7th, 2004, 06:55 PM
My favourites composers are: Mozart, Beethoven, Wagner, Bach, Orff and Schubert.
Anne-Sophie Mutter is a very good violinist! :)

skinhead24
Tuesday, August 31st, 2004, 08:03 PM
My favourites are Richard Wagner Anton Bruckner.
Its difficult to say were the best!
Every Time have ther musik.
So the "KLASSIK" Beethoven..
"Romantik" Weber...
And Wagner - Wagner is my Composer.
His Musik is Futur and have a Vision!

:P