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View Full Version : BitTorrent: The Best File-Sharing Protocol!



Nordhammer
Sunday, August 22nd, 2004, 04:31 PM
BitTorrent is an open protocol for sharing large files and filesets. It's super easy to use. BitTorrent downloads are started just by clicking on small .torrent files or hyperlinks which are opened with your choice of BitTorrent client. Downloaders get pieces of the fileset from the original server, and from anyone else who is downloading. The more people there are downloading the same thing, the lower the burden on the central server, and the faster everyone's downloads get, due to sharing with each other. The more, the merrier!!!

For further information and guides -
http://wiki.etree.org/index.php?page=BitTorrent

Want to try games and software before you buy them?

Want to listen to music albums to see if they're worth buying?

Want to watch movies currently at the theater and many other videos on your computer or make a near perfect copy of a DVD movie to play on your DVD player?

Do you not have cable, but want to watch TV shows? Did you want to see a TV show you missed? Want to watch TV shows without commercials?

BitTorrent is the answer.

Dieter_
Thursday, September 2nd, 2004, 08:33 PM
Nordhammer, for some reason it is taking ages to fully assemble these bit-torrent files...My speed is going down to 2kbs per second much of the time and even goes down to ZERO at times...

Do you know why this is and how I can make the downloads quicker?

Evolved
Wednesday, September 8th, 2004, 03:34 PM
When I download these .torrent files and open them it gives me a bunch of .rar files, and 2 .nfo files. There is no way to open them with my DVD player. :confused:

AngryPotato
Thursday, September 9th, 2004, 05:06 AM
So use winrar and extract them. At that point it'll probably give you mpeg/avi or bin/iso type files. If it goes to bin/iso types use isobuster and it'll extact them to mpegs. Otherwise you can burn them to cd as a vcd. Be more specific! :icon_evil

Nordhammer
Tuesday, September 14th, 2004, 04:27 PM
Nordhammer, for some reason it is taking ages to fully assemble these bit-torrent files...My speed is going down to 2kbs per second much of the time and even goes down to ZERO at times...

Do you know why this is and how I can make the downloads quicker?

I am guessing the bandwidth bottleneck is other people uploading to you.

In some cases trackers will limit clients by delaying their transfers or bandwidth according to the clients' share ratio. Low ratios are penalized. I recommend at least uploading to a .5 ratio, but 1.0 is always best.

It's more common that uploaders are very few and/or are uploading so much else or limiting their bandwidth that you cannot get faster speeds. If there are many people uploading and seeding you have a much greater chance of getting a fast download.

So my advice to everyone is try and start downloading on BT as soon as the file is available as the original seeder and uploaders gradually leave.

All things considered BT is the fastest file transfer protocol available that I have seen. Emule and others are constantly slow. I can get something on BT if it's new and download it in a few hours versus a week or more on Emule.

Nordhammer
Tuesday, September 14th, 2004, 04:36 PM
When I download these .torrent files and open them it gives me a bunch of .rar files, and 2 .nfo files. There is no way to open them with my DVD player. :confused:

You can't use those files yet, they're compressed and split into smaller files from the original source. I personally don't like this style of file preparation and don't have a use for it, and it also doubles the space needed for the file. These sources claim that doing this enables them to just download a few of the split files if a error happens, instead of having to download the entirety again. I've never had a problem with file corruption with one large file, and even if I did it's highly improbable that I would be able to find someone who has those certain files I need or be able to select only those few files from a BT tracker. So this preparation is mostly for those people internal to those underground groups.

What you have to do is use a program to decompress and unite those files into the original source. In most cases you can use a program called WinRAR. I think you have it on that CD I gave you or you can download it on the net.

Gustavus Magnus
Friday, March 11th, 2005, 09:51 PM
Do you know of any good sites to recommend? Or is that illegal? I'd like to mention the worlds largest tracker, www.piratebay.org, and if it's illegal to share this knowledge with you, then delete it. The site is in Swedish, but anyone can understand it, most of the content is in English after all...

Náttfari
Friday, March 11th, 2005, 09:55 PM
I use BitTorrent with the Pirate Bay alot. Great program.

Gustavus Magnus
Friday, March 11th, 2005, 10:17 PM
I use BitTorrent with the Pirate Bay alot.

So do I. However, sometimes I do not find enough on Piratebay, there's only like three or four Dreamcast games. :) (If you're into Dreamcast, I've got some games I suspect some people on this board will like: Panzer Front, Strikers 1945, and Iron Aces ;))

Blutwölfin
Monday, November 7th, 2005, 10:37 AM
BitTorrent: Film file-sharer sent to prison

A Hong Kong man has been jailed for three months for film piracy after he shared movie files over the internet.

The authorities say he is the first person in the world to be prosecuted for passing on files using a popular file-sharing program called BitTorrent.

It makes the sharing of material easy by breaking a file up into fragments and then distributing them.

The film industry says it hopes the sentence handed down to Chan Nai-ming will prove a deterrent to others.

Hidden trail

Chan, an unemployed man who called himself "Big Crook", was arrested in January for uploading three Hollywood movies - Daredevil, Red Planet and Miss Congeniality - onto the internet without a licence.

He was using a popular file-sharing program called BitTorrent, which allows users to download content from multiple sources. Each source supplies a small part of the whole film or song.

When anyone downloads a file it becomes a source for others, making it easy to share or trade music or movies, but very hard to trace who has uploaded or downloaded the material.

The Motion Pictures Association of America says its members lose $900m dollars in potential revenue to piracy each year in Asia alone.

The authorities in Hong Kong hope that Chan's three-month sentence will deter others. But the BBC's Hong Kong correspondent Chris Hogg says that since April when Chan was first charged and his case was widely publicised, there has been no noticeable impact on the number of files being shared over the internet.

BitTorrent targeted

The other problem is the time it takes to build a successful prosecution, making it almost impossible to carry out a comprehensive crackdown on small-time internet pirates, our correspondent adds.

The movie industry started targeting the operators of BitTorrent networks themselves last December.

It filed numerous lawsuits against BitTorrent server sites which linked to copyrighted material in order to undermine the ability to swap content.

The action resulted in the closure of some high-profile BitTorrent sites.

In May, US Federal authorities succeeded in closing a website that was distributing pirated copies of Star Wars: Episode III: Revenge of the Sith before the film opened in cinemas.



Source: BBC (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/4413540.stm)