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Moody
Friday, June 11th, 2004, 09:19 PM
Link to the Eddas;

http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/poe/

http://www.ugcs.caltech.edu/~cherryne/edda.html

http://www.squirrel.com/squirrel/asatru/free.html

http://www.geocities.com/SouthBeach/Lagoon/7152/edda/edda1.html

http://www.tyler-adam.com/thor.gif

ThorsHammer
Saturday, June 12th, 2004, 12:58 AM
Or a faster way to get them is this.


The Poetic Edda Parts 1 and 2 by Henry Adams Bellows (http://members.lycos.co.uk/thorshammer1488/PoeticEdda.zip)

The Prose Edda by Snorri Sturluson (http://members.lycos.co.uk/thorshammer1488/ProseEdda.zip)

NOTE: To download right click on the URL, select "Save target as" and save the file to a folder you will be able to find it. After you do that, do what you will, print them out or read them at your computer, as long as you enjoy them.

;)

NormanBlood
Sunday, June 13th, 2004, 07:52 AM
Best online version I've seen is at northvegr website. ThoughI would recomment buying them more than the online versions...tend to be more accurate. The one I have is Hollander's translation. Quite good I think.

Rodskarl Dubhgall
Sunday, June 13th, 2004, 08:37 AM
Best online version I've seen is at northvegr website. ThoughI would recomment buying them more than the online versions...tend to be more accurate. The one I have is Hollander's translation. Quite good I think.
Are we the only ones who know about Northvegr?

:hveđrungur:
Monday, August 9th, 2004, 07:28 PM
I took the liberty of putting the Prose and Poetic edda's on text file, zipping them up and hosting them for the members of the northern European forums heathenry and native religions forum to download and enjoy if they have not yet. These are two must read peices of writing for all people of the heathen walk of life so here they are:

The Poetic Edda Parts 1 and 2 by Henry Adams Bellows (http://members.lycos.co.uk/thorshammer1488/PoeticEdda.zip)

The Prose Edda by Snorri Sturluson (http://members.lycos.co.uk/thorshammer1488/ProseEdda.zip)


NOTE: To download right click on the URL, select "Save target as" and save the file to a folder you will be able to find it. After you do that, do what you will, print them out or read them at your computer, as long as you enjoy them.

I know that sometimes the links will need to be refreshed or the eddas re hosted so if you try to download them and they do not work for you just shoot me a private message and I will get em back up ASAP.


Enjoy guys :viking4:

Eric34
Sunday, August 15th, 2004, 12:53 AM
Edda was here a really really famous and popular rock -band. :)

:hveđrungur:
Sunday, August 15th, 2004, 01:00 AM
Edda was here a really really famous and popular rock -band. :)
Thanks for that little tid bit of information bro :laugh:

Sonja
Tuesday, April 5th, 2005, 03:08 PM
Up-to-date links:

I. Edda Sćmundar (http://runeberg.org/eddais/) (Íslenska)
The Poetic Edda, transferred to modern day Icelandic.

II. Edda Sćmundar (http://runeberg.org/eddan/) (Svenska)
The Poetic Edda, translated to Swedish by Erik Brate.

III. Edda Sćmundar (http://www.squirrel.com/squirrel/asatru/poetic_edda.txt) (English)
The Poetic Edda, translated into English by Stephan Grundy.

IV. The Prose Edda (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/pre/pre00.htm) (English)
By Snorri Sturluson, translated from the Icelandic with an introduction by Arthur Gilchrist Brodeur, Ph.D. (1916).

V. Heimskringla (http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/heim/index.htm) (English)
Originally written in Old Norse, app. 1225 A.D., by the poet and historian Snorri Sturlson. English translation by Samuel Laing (London, 1844).

:NorseHelm Enjoy...

Oddstríđir
Tuesday, May 17th, 2005, 02:11 PM
The Edda I will read as a book in Old Norse

Blutwölfin
Thursday, July 7th, 2005, 12:32 AM
The Elder Edda of Saemund Sigfusson and the Younger Edda of Snorri Sturlasson (http://www.blackmask.com/cgi-bin/links/jump.cgi?ID=d16451) (.zop-file)

:hveđrungur:
Saturday, September 17th, 2005, 02:04 AM
Are we the only ones who know about Northvegr?

I know about Northvegr BUT the wealth of information there on that website and translations of texts cannot be ignored. Use it for what it is, a resource. That is all personal opinion though, just dont see why one would rob themselfs of something that could help better their understanding of the lore because of something they heard about the two people who run it.

Sigurd Volsung
Friday, January 20th, 2006, 06:35 PM
I have been fascinated with Nordic mythology for quite a while now, and I have recently discovered about the Poetic and Prose Eddas. I am quite new to this specific type of literature, so be kind to me, please :).

Anyways, after searching the net for these two books, I have found out that many editions are for sale - but which versions would you recommend?

Once again, I would like to buy both books, but I would need a helping hand to guide me towards the best selection to make.


Thanks for your time.

Moody
Wednesday, July 26th, 2006, 07:04 PM
the Poetic and Prose Eddas...
Anyways, after searching the net for these two books, I have found out that many editions are for sale - but which versions would you recommend?


The Hollander translation of the Poetic Edda is very good, and is recommended by most today.
It's good because Hollander has a good turn of poetic phrase, often using semi-archaic English to render the original in an alliterative style.

http://www.utexas.edu/utpress/books/holpoe.html


The book The Masks of Odin, by Titchenell, has less good translations of the Poetic Edda, but actually has some good interpretations of the texts.
Here's an online version;
http://theosociety.org/pasadena/odin/odin-hp.htm


I have the standard Everyman edition of the Prose Edda, translated by Anthony Faulkes - there may be better ones of that.
I see Northvegr recommend that too. This link gives their various recommendations for these vital texts;
http://www.northvegr.org/northern/book/bibliography.php

Sigurd
Monday, September 18th, 2006, 06:14 PM
Don't trust people who are called Ari. Especially if they run Northvegr. Their fairy-tales are very good; and their site offers plenty of valuable information, but they themselves are apparently not the pleasant sort.

You may like their articles on their page, some of them are very well present; but just whatever you do, remember, do not do business with the people who run it.

Here's a few Links concerning the Northvegr case as heard at the Lögretta (A Vinlandic Heathen lawspeaking body):
http://web.archive.org/web/20050308062012/logretta.org/3.htm
http://web.archive.org/web/20050308102152/logretta.org/case/northvegr/3.htm

PS: Pardon, the actual case seems to be no longer up; anyway, they were finally outlawed from the Heathen community, being found guilty of several charges of larceny, and slander.

So, again, trust the information on Northvegr - but NOT THE PEOPLE!

Airmanareiks
Thursday, December 28th, 2006, 08:11 PM
Re: "Vinland Logretta"

That case seems incompetent.
The charge is ambigous with no direct accusation, statements, evidence, times, dates.
It seems more like a dislike of.
In a court of law, they would defend themselves, not someone else. Without there testimony, the decision of the "court" is invalid. It is valid for those who give them power.
From looking at the members of the assembly, they seem to be the "average joe". Meaning. It is more of a rabble court where the medocre masses banish from them who are their betters. That is, who they do not like. I debated many years ago many of them and they did not like me because I made them look stupid. I would debate them theologically and they would look stupid and flame on me to save face.

I would look at each case (what there are of them and make my own decision). In this case, there is no case.

Carl
Tuesday, September 30th, 2008, 02:29 PM
I too have studied the Hollander text (The Poetic Edda) for many years ... an interesting and convincing translation with many invaluable comments and insights. A learned man; published originally in 1962 by the University of Texas (!!) . At times, the Eddaic narrative is confused and overlapping ; it is very helpful to try and understand what the reading might be saying..... especially in the earlier sections.....


I would however want to add that Henry Adams BELLOWS version of the Poetic Edda is also extremely valuable - since some of his alternative arrangements make for greater clarity of the narrative and therefore the meaning. He again supplies invaluable insights and explanations of the original Text. Originally published in 1923 by the American Scandinavian Foundation.

This original text-compilation surely is the early basis for much subsequent writing.... it is one we know about. Many others texts are , one must assume , now lost.

Psychonaut
Tuesday, September 30th, 2008, 07:52 PM
I'll have to agree with the gentlemen here and admit to being quite fond of the Hollander translation. Sometimes I'll take a look at the Larrington edition, just to clarify a passage or two, but nothing can replace the archaic majesty of Hollander. His text, I find, is especially appropriate when Eddic verses are called for in ritual settings.

Carl
Wednesday, October 1st, 2008, 03:34 PM
Ha yes. I was looking again at the Larrington edition recently but really, the language is a disappointment. I am not quite sure what she was doing. All texts are likely to of some value - but the masterful ones tend to shine. How different it seems to have been in Germany, where there were ( are?) many translations .... from the Grimm's onwards. A rich heritage.

Leof
Wednesday, October 1st, 2008, 04:25 PM
There is a lot available online that are a better translation. I generally say avoid the Hollander translations. The Hollander translation can be bought in just about any bookstore so it is popular by proxy of being everywhere. He is more interested in making it sound good than providing an accurate portrayal of what is being said. He also seems to be partial to his own biases and will interpolate without citation which is a huge no-no.

Carl
Wednesday, October 1st, 2008, 05:50 PM
Interesting - so which texts would you suggest from your own internet experience? Worth remembering that the Hollander was a fairly early publication. Nothing is perfect ;)

Loddfafner
Wednesday, October 1st, 2008, 07:15 PM
The archives of the Yahoo group Havamal Studies include side-by-side, verse-by-verse readings of all the translations:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/havamal_studies/

GroeneWolf
Saturday, October 4th, 2008, 06:39 PM
I have been fascinated with Nordic mythology for quite a while now, and I have recently discovered about the Poetic and Prose Eddas. I am quite new to this specific type of literature, so be kind to me, please :).

Anyways, after searching the net for these two books, I have found out that many editions are for sale - but which versions would you recommend?

Once again, I would like to buy both books, but I would need a helping hand to guide me towards the best selection to make.


Thanks for your time.

English translations are probably coverd. Don't know if you can read Dutch. But for the Prose Edda you should keep in mind that Snorri was writing a manual to preserve the Skaldic arts for the future.

However if you can read Dutch the old Edda has two translations here. Jan de Vries, first done by the famous Germanicist, that keep close to the original poetic style. But does on some place change the placements of stances, or doesn't add them at all.

Second that from Marcel van Otten. Which translates it directly and literaly. But at the expense of poetic style and translates to much. And from what I heard from someone I talked with about Dutch Edda translations, his workvieuw is neither scientific of Heathen.

Carl
Saturday, October 4th, 2008, 07:09 PM
Hmm.... I doubt if SV will appear ...one never knows! But is there much interest in Holland in these old Eddas? Vikings once ruled in England (!) - but I dont think that happened to you?? Are there any strange group over there who still attempt to honour the Gods? :??: :oanieyes

GroeneWolf
Saturday, October 4th, 2008, 08:36 PM
Hmm.... I doubt if SV will appear ...one never knows! But is there much interest in Holland in these old Eddas? Vikings once ruled in England (!) - but I dont think that happened to you?? Are there any strange group over there who still attempt to honour the Gods? :??: :oanieyes

For groups that honour the old Gods. Nothing coming close to the profesionalism of the OR, For Sidr, ect.

But group wise you got :

Nederlands Heidendom (http://www.nederlandsheidendom.nl/webstek/) En Het Rad (http://www.hetrad.nl/) wich tends to be more Universalist. While NH is a bit more mixed but more tending towards Folkish.

And for Vikings ruling the Netherlands. There are some local saga's that have close similarity with was being told in the Edda's. And some of my friends would argue that the first viking raids where done by Frisian refugees anyway. Wich brings to mind that Forseti founds was an important God amongs them since he gave them the basis for Frisian laws.

HeidiStreich
Sunday, November 13th, 2011, 05:24 AM
Hollanders is okay. But you will be much better off reading the Eddas off of sacred texts site. Hollanders loses impact when you read other translations.

Dvergr
Thursday, February 2nd, 2012, 08:44 PM
So does anyone have an active online reference for a word-for-word translation of the Poetic and Prose Edda ? Just about every link in this thread is broken. The Sacred-Text translation is Bellows, if nothing else I will go with that or is the Yahoo group translations word-for-word better ?

Found an excellent translation of the Völuspá with commentary explaining the translation ... http://www.nordic-life.org/nmh/voluspa.htm ... they even give word-for-word of certain lines since they are dry and up for interpretation in translation. This is what I am looking for, with the rest of the text, this right here.

Hersir
Thursday, February 2nd, 2012, 09:13 PM
So does anyone have an active online reference for a word-for-word translation of the Poetic and Prose Edda ? Just about every link in this thread is broken. The Sacred-Text translation is Bellows, if nothing else I will go with that or is the Yahoo group translations word-for-word better ?

Found an excellent translation of the Völuspá with commentary explaining the translation ... http://www.nordic-life.org/nmh/voluspa.htm ... they even give word-for-word of certain lines since they are dry and up for interpretation in translation. This is what I am looking for, with the rest of the text, this right here.


You could try http://www.heimskringla.no/wiki/Main_Page

Dvergr
Thursday, February 23rd, 2012, 06:30 PM
I am looking for an original ON text of Vafţrúđnismál and corresponding English translation if anyone has a link or idea of where to find it ?

velvet
Thursday, February 23rd, 2012, 07:01 PM
I am looking for an original ON text of Vafţrúđnismál and corresponding English translation if anyone has a link or idea of where to find it ?

The original is here (http://heimskringla.no/wiki/Vaf%C3%BEr%C3%BA%C3%B0nism%C3%A1l)

Only translations into other Scandinavian languages there though, not English.

Didnt check this one (http://www.cybersamurai.net/Mythology/nordic_gods/LegendsSagas/Edda/PoeticEdda/Vafthruthnismol.htm), but it may be worth a try.