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View Full Version : Were Hallstatt Nordic people natives of CE?



kgnju
Wednesday, July 5th, 2006, 04:03 AM
Hi,guys!Were Hallstatt Nordic people natives of central Europe?Or did they migrate from the northern bank of Black Sea after a great flood with Indo-European language?If they passed through the Donaube corridor,what physical relation did they have with Neu-Donaubians?

Dr. Solar Wolff
Wednesday, July 5th, 2006, 06:45 AM
Well, if you read Carlton Coon, Races of Europe, carefully and skip around and correlate: Hallstatt means: Hall=Illyrian word for salt, statt= must be city as in Stadt. So Hallstatt is Salt City. Coon says it is in Austria. Somehow, this Celtic Iron culture became wealthy exporting salt which they mined to the Med. world. Salt was very valuable to preserve meat in the days before refirgeration. I have often wondered if Hallstatt, SaltCity is Saltzburg. This culture expanded according to Coon about 1000 B.C. or so. It went first North to the Black Sea area and later West into Poland/N.Germany. Finally, about 500 B.C., they entered Skandaniva through Jutland. These people expanded and were successful because of all the old reasons, better weapons and better war organization. Coon sees this final expansion as the introduction of Odin into the Norse Pantheon. Before, the supreme male god was Thorburn. Thorburn was the Zuse-Jupitor of the Germans. Odin was something quite different and to some extent replaced Thorburn. Odin brought the Runes, for instance. Coon subscribes to the theory that Odin was an actual person. This would have been a great war leader. There are other instances of great war leaders becoming gods in the Indo-Aryan world. Indra is the other great example. Perhaps Odin led these Illyrian speaking Hallstatt Culture from the Black Sea area into Sweden. In any event, they found a real home in Sweden and multiplied rapidly. Due of climatic deterioration of about 500 B.C., these people re-emerged and migrated out of Sweden in all directions during the Germanic expansion period. You see, by this time they were Germans. Somehow, the language had probably been simplified, new farming methods had been invented, and probably new types of crops were being used in the North.

kgnju
Wednesday, July 5th, 2006, 09:37 AM
Thank you very much,Dr.!:) Your points really enriched my thought about Hallstatt culture,especially the one of "Saltzburg".Thank you!But I'm puzzled by one of your sentence:

This culture expanded according to Coon about 1000 B.C. or so. It went first North to the Black Sea area and later West into Poland/N.Germany.
Is this sentence geographically right?
http://www3.iath.virginia.edu/Barbarians/Maps/mainmap1.jpg

Nordgau
Thursday, July 6th, 2006, 04:37 PM
Well, if you read Carlton Coon, Races of Europe, carefully and skip around and correlate: Hallstatt means: Hall=Illyrian word for salt, statt= must be city as in Stadt. So Hallstatt is Salt City. Coon says it is in Austria. Somehow, this Celtic Iron culture became wealthy exporting salt which they mined to the Med. world. Salt was very valuable to preserve meat in the days before refirgeration. I have often wondered if Hallstatt, SaltCity is Saltzburg.

You mean, you wonder if Hallstatt actually was Salzburg? :-O No way, they are two different modern towns, even if located close to another.

http://www.hallstatt.net/pics/titelbilder/winter.jpg

By the way, salt always played an important role in the history of the town, but there exist doubts if the town's name was actually derived from a word for "salt" according to Wikipedia:

Anders als früher angenommen und bis heute in Fremdenverkehrsprospekten behauptet, ist der Namensbestandteil 'hall' nicht auf das keltische Wort für Salz zurückzuführen, das wohl *saleinom gelautet hat. Zwar heißt Salz im Walisischen 'halen', aber der Lautwandel von s- zu h- im Anlaut wurde nur in den britannischen Sprachen vollzogen und nicht in den keltischen Sprachen des europäischen Festlands. Das einheimische keltische Wort wäre also nicht als 'Hall' ins Deutsche übernommen worden, sondern als 'Salln' o.ä.