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Euclides
Wednesday, November 19th, 2003, 01:39 PM
Mongolian-Spot
Alias : Mongolian Spot is a macular blue grey pigmentation ·
Incidence : in 90 % of children of mongoloid race and 1 % in caucasians in Europe and 80% in East africa
Environment : normal infants of Mongoloid and some other races
Age : present at birth
Aetiology : pigmentation develops in foetal life
Symptoms : after birth increase and later less obvious to disappear at age 7 and always at age 13 - seldom persists to later life

http://home.tiscali.nl/sb137765/G.M3.html

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GERMANY

''Until this day it can be observed that some children born in an area around Berlin in Germany wear the blue Mongoloid spot at birth at the bases of their spines. Attila and his army had traveled through there, although his soldiers didn't rape the women and kill the men in that part of Germany. History has it that the soldiers under the command of one of his generals went AWOL after they had suffered a defeat in another part of Northern Germany and were on retreat. They hid in the woods and were eventually taken in and assimilated by the local population in that area where we now have Berlin. Obviously they were well-liked; therefore today's blue spots at the base of the spine of some babies born around Berlin and elsewhere.''

http://www.fathersforlife.org/fatherhood/attila.htm

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MEXICO....

Islas DL, Flores FG
Frecuencia de la mancha mongólica en niños recién nacidos

Rev Mex Pediatr 2002; 69(4): 144-145.



RESUMEN


Objetivo. Conocer la frecuencia de la mancha mongólica en neonatos nacidos en un hospital general. Material y métodos. Durante siete meses se examinaron en el hospital 3,760 niños recién nacidos. Todos fueron revisados en las primeras 24 horas de vida. Resultados. Se encontró en 208 (5.5%) niños. Predominó su localización en la región sacra (65.6%), lumbosacra (25.9%) y lumbar (7.6%). La mancha mongólica de localización aberrante se observó con una frecuencia de 8.6%. Conclusiones. La frecuencia registrada fue menor que la informada por otros autores. Sin embargo, la localización aberrante de la mancha es ligeramente mayor que la reportada en la literatura.


Palabras clave: Mancha mongólica, dermatosis en neonatos.

http://www.imbiomed.com/SocPed/Spv69n4/espanol/Wsp0024-05.html



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URUGUAY....



URUGUAYOS DESCENDIENTES DE LOS CHARRUAS AYER Y HOY

Actualmente existen en nuestro país, decenas de miles de descendientes de Charrúas, y la mayoría de ellos no tiene conocimiento de los lazos familiares, aunque lejanos, que los unen a esos ancestros. Como prueba de ello mencionaremos tres sólidas argumentaciones:

A) Estudios realizados por la Dra. Mónica Sans:

La antropóloga Dra. Mónica Sans realizó diversos estudios sobre el tema "Aporte Indígena a la Población Actual", en estrecha colaboración con la Asociación de Descendientes de la Nación Charrúa – Asoc. Civil -,pero nos referiremos solo al punto del mestizaje encontrado a través del rasgo denominado "Mancha Mongólica".

Esta mancha se presenta desde el nacimiento prácticamente en el 100% de los amerindios y en sus descendientes, también en el 80% de poblaciones africanas y sus descendientes. En cambio en poblaciones europeas y sus descendientes apenas llega al un 10%.



http://www.internet.com.uy/charruas/tramites/descendientes_ayer_y_hoy.htm



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PORTUGAL....



As manchas mongólicas são máculas azul-acinzentadas de tonalidade variável e de margens irregulares que surgem à nascença ou pouco tempo depois. A localização mais frequente é a região lombo-sagrada, podendo ocorrer nas nádegas, coxas, dorso e ombros. Está presente em mais de 80% dos recém-nascidos de raça negra ou mongólica, daí o nome!
Na raça caucasiana apenas 10% dos recém-nascidos estão afectados. Num estudo realizado numa maternidade portuguesa, a mancha mongólica foi encontrada em 22% dos recém-nascidos. A cor das manchas deve-se à localização dérmica de melanócitos cheios de melanina, que detiveram a sua migração da crista neural para a epiderme.
Geralmente desaparecem na primeira infância.

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Brazil

Mancha mongólica - mancha de cor azulada, localizada geralmente em região sacrococcígia,

que significa miscigenação das raças.

http://www.londrina.pr.gov.br/saude/instrucoes/puericultura/downloads/9.pdf



"Todo brasileiro, mesmo o alvo, de cabelo louro, traz na alma, quando não na alma e no corpo - há muita gente de jenipapo ou mancha mongólica pelo Brasil - a sombra, ou pelo menos a pinta, do indígena ou do negro".

Gilberto Freyre

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http://ethnomed.org/ethnomed/clin_topics/dermatology/pigmented_main.html

Tifilis
Wednesday, November 19th, 2003, 02:09 PM
What is really a Mongolian spot? Pigmention? Eeh.?

cosmocreator
Wednesday, November 19th, 2003, 07:55 PM
This may hint at a connection between Capoid, Mongoloid and Sinanthropus.

Euclides
Friday, November 21st, 2003, 06:34 PM
What is really a Mongolian spot? Pigmention? Eeh.?

The Mongolian spot: a study of ethnic differences and a literature review.

Cordova A.

Four hundred thirty-seven consecutively born full-term neonates, delivered at Jackson Memorial Hospital, were examined for the presence of mongolian spots (MS). The spots were found in 96% of the Negro children, 46% of the Hispanic children, 9.5% of the Caucasian children, and in both of the Asian children in the series. The sacro-gluteal region was the most frequent site of pigmentation, with the shoulders next in frequency. Almost all the spots on the extremities were located on the extensor surfaces. The color was most frequently blue-green, but was also commonly greenish-blue, blue-gray, or brown. In a concurrent review of 124 newborn records, MS was not described by house officers in any, although the probability of its occurrence would have been approximately 90 cases, based on the results of the study. A comprehensive review of the history of the description of MS and theories of its development, as well as a review of the clinical aspects, is presented.

PMID: 7028354 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Evolved
Friday, November 21st, 2003, 06:51 PM
I didn't have one. :nope

Razmig
Friday, March 5th, 2004, 12:42 AM
this "blue back" finds itself most commonly in mongols, turkmens, turks, and some greeks, oddly enough never a case of an armenian having it

Dome
Sunday, June 13th, 2004, 03:36 AM
Hmm, weird, the mongolian spot is so common? Well, at least chinese and most turkics don't have it, which made it a useful marker for distinguishing "mongolness" of a newborn child in olden times...

Awar
Sunday, June 13th, 2004, 03:43 AM
I remember having a spot at the base of my spine when I was like 13-14 yrs old. It appeared then, was there during the time I was quickly growing taller, and later it disappeared completely.

Maybe I'm a son of a hun :D Does it qualify at that age?

I also had such a spot on my calve when I was a kid.
I had it up until I was 10-11

Dome
Sunday, June 13th, 2004, 03:56 AM
Nope, the spot appears with a newborn and stays for a couple of weeks, not more. Maybe you had bruises or something.

Awar
Sunday, June 13th, 2004, 04:22 AM
Nope, the spot appears with a newborn and stays for a couple of weeks, not more. Maybe you had bruises or something.

Could be, I was growing very quickly at that time. The mark disappeared when I stopped growing so fast. Thanks anyway.

xakep
Sunday, June 13th, 2004, 09:36 AM
Stretch marks perhaps?

Emperor
Monday, June 14th, 2004, 03:07 AM
Hmm, weird, the mongolian spot is so common? Well, at least chinese and most turkics don't have it, which made it a useful marker for distinguishing "mongolness" of a newborn child in olden times...
Chinese do have it. Try google for some more info.

Dome
Monday, June 21st, 2004, 04:18 AM
Chinese do have it. Try google for some more info.
Than those chinese can be proud of their altaic ancestry. I do hope you meant han chinese though.

Emperor
Wednesday, June 23rd, 2004, 07:20 PM
Than those chinese can be proud of their altaic ancestry. I do hope you meant han chinese though.
Yes, i meant Han Chinese. But other Chinese, like Manchu and Mongolian (doh) have it too. ;)

Polak
Friday, June 25th, 2004, 02:09 PM
Interesting stuff.

I wonder what the frequency of this spot is all around Europe? And is it associated with Hun and Mongol movements during the middle ages?

Northern Paladin
Saturday, June 26th, 2004, 11:02 PM
What causes these spots to appear? And what is their purpose?

Dr. Solar Wolff
Sunday, June 27th, 2004, 08:42 AM
I remember reading that certain Swiss Cantons had a high frequency of the Mongoloid spot. The discussion went: The Huns retreated through Switzerland and some must have settled there---or something like this. As I recall, this was the only mention of it in Europe. I don't think Awar's spot, as he describes it, was not the Mongoloid spot. As far as I know, this spot does not appear in the northern forest people of Europe or the Sami so I don't know why Ig is checking for a spot. Maybe Polak knows more about this.

Euclides
Sunday, June 27th, 2004, 05:52 PM
Niger J Med. 2001 Jul-Sep;10(3):121-3.


Prevalence of Mongolian spots in Nigerian children in Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

Onayemi O, Adejuyigbe EA, Torimiro SE, Oyelami O, Jegede OA.

Department of Dermatology & Venereology, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

Three hundred and sixty nine Nigerian neonates and 484 Nigerian children aged 1 month to 14 years were examined for the presence of Mongolian spots. The spots were observed in 381 children (189 boys and 192 girls) with an overall incidence of 44.7% regardless of sex or age. The colour of the Mongolian spots varied from pale blue to grayish blue. The most frequently involved sites were the gluteal, sacrococcygeal and lumbar areas respectively. In our study, Mongolian spots were present in 74.8% of neonates and in 13.6% of pre-school children. There was a rapid disappearance in the incidence of Mongolian spots with advancing age. No case of Mongolian spot was recorded in children aged 6 years and above. Primipara whose children have Mongolian spots should be reassured that the spots are harmless and would usually disappear in early childhood. Physicians should however be alert to marks resulting from child abuse as these could mimic the spots.



...



Int J Dermatol. 1988 Mar;27(2):106-8.


Mongolian spots in Chinese children.

Leung AK.

Department of Paediatrics, University of Calgary, Faculty of Medicine, Alberta, Canada.

Ninety-two Chinese Canadian newborn infants (49 boys and 43 girls) and 1633 Chinese Canadian children (819 boys and 814 girls) in Calgary, Alberta, Canada were examined for the presence of Mongolian spots. Mongolian spots were present in all newborns and disappeared slowly until 6 years of age when the rate of disappearance increased. At 10 years of age, none were found. The overall incidence regardless of age was 58% in boys and 53.3% in girls. The most frequent site of involvement was the sacrococcygeal area, followed by the gluteal and lumbar areas. Both sides were equally affected. In only 7.8% of boys and 3.3% of girls was the involved area greater than 15% of the body surface area. Most (63.8% of boys and 67.4% of girls) had less than 5% involved. The color of the Mongolian spots varied from gray to grayish blue to grayish black. In general, younger children had darker Mongolian spots.

...




Clin Pediatr (Phila). 1981 Nov;20(11):714-9. Related Articles, Links


The Mongolian spot: a study of ethnic differences and a literature review.

Cordova A.

Four hundred thirty-seven consecutively born full-term neonates, delivered at Jackson Memorial Hospital, were examined for the presence of mongolian spots (MS). The spots were found in 96% of the Negro children, 46% of the Hispanic children, 9.5% of the Caucasian children, and in both of the Asian children in the series. The sacro-gluteal region was the most frequent site of pigmentation, with the shoulders next in frequency. Almost all the spots on the extremities were located on the extensor surfaces. The color was most frequently blue-green, but was also commonly greenish-blue, blue-gray, or brown. In a concurrent review of 124 newborn records, MS was not described by house officers in any, although the probability of its occurrence would have been approximately 90 cases, based on the results of the study. A comprehensive review of the history of the description of MS and theories of its development, as well as a review of the clinical aspects, is presented.

Dobermann
Monday, October 11th, 2004, 04:42 PM
It's also found among middle-eastern peoples and some south european and jewish types.it has to do with pigmentation i dont think it means automatically that you descend from negro's or mongols though.